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Car Fees

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1997
In favor of conservation and [combating] global warming, why not have the California state motor vehicle registration fee be affected in part by the mpg of the vehicle being registered? Those of us who choose vehicles with high mileage per gallon would pay less than those who choose vehicles with low mpg mileage. PAT McCAMBRIDGE Ventura
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 16, 2011 | David Lazarus
Scott Baggett traveled from California to Hawaii recently. While on the islands, he rented a car from Hertz. Baggett, 38, had thought he'd be paying $17.95 a day for his wheels. The actual charge, once all the taxes and fees were piled on, came to $32.95. That's nearly double the advertised price. "This practice is deceptive and unfair," Baggett told me. "Plain and simple. " Well, it's plain that hiding extra charges is deceptive and unfair. Yet this is anything but simple.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2008 | Richard Winton
Sheriff Lee Baca said an investigation into allegations that a sergeant stole more than $400,000 in car impound fees has prompted a review of the way his department handles such transactions for the dozens of cities it patrols. Baca said he plans to have the towing operators collect the administrative fees directly from motorists, rather than involving sheriff's officials. "I don't see the need for the department to be a cashier," he said. "The system has to be tightened." Sheriff's officials initiated the review after La Puente officials reported a significant shortfall in the fees that were supposed to have been collected by the Sheriff's Department, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Democratic lawmakers are rushing to meet a Wednesday deadline with a spending plan that would tax purchases from online outlets such as Amazon.com, bump up car registration fees and local sales tax rates and impose a new fee on residents in fire zones. The plan also would cut from higher education, public safety and courts; defer billions of dollars in payments; and revive a plan to sell state buildings that was abandoned months ago after being deemed too costly.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2003
James Gilden's comparison of driving and flying in the Travel section was well done ("Which Is Cheaper, Flying or Driving? Crunch the Numbers," Travel Insider, Sept. 7]. However, he left out something important: At most destinations, the traveler will need a car. This means renting a car or taking lots of taxis. Either involves expense, and taxis mean trouble as well. They're never there when you need them. By contrast, if you drive you have your car there; there is no additional expense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2008 | Evan Halper, Halper is a Times staff writer.
State lawmakers began moving toward a deal this week to close California's deficit with the help of steeper car fees that would cost many drivers hundreds of dollars annually, according to people involved in budget talks. Under the plan, GOP lawmakers -- most of whom have signed anti-tax pledges -- would vote to triple the vehicle license fee that owners pay when they register their cars every year in exchange for a ballot measure that would impose rigid limits on future state spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2003 | Evan Halper and Daren Briscoe, Times Staff Writers
Faced with angry reactions from local officials up and down the state, Democratic leaders of the California Legislature said Tuesday that they are prepared to raise vehicle registration fees in order to avoid deep cuts to cities and counties. Assembly Speaker Herb Wesson (D-Culver City) said restoration of the fees to earlier levels, which Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1996
I can sympathize with Lionel Rolfe ("Car Fees and Parking Tickets Are a Tax on the Poor," Voices, April 20), since I, too, am poor. I'm a college student at UCI, and the parking situation here is horrendous. On most days, I can't find a parking spot as early as 8 a.m. Rushing to get to class, I often take a chance and park in the preferred parking zone. I've gotten so many tickets I can't even count them. Though it's stressful at times, I can't blame anyone. If everyone got a break, we wouldn't need rules--or the government, for that matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998
Perhaps the most divisive issue in Sacramento is the proposal by Gov. Pete Wilson to sharply reduce the annual taxes Californians pay to register their cars. Wilson's plan would slash in half the 2% tax on the value of motor vehicles and would return to taxpayers almost $1 billion of the state's $4.4 billion surplus. Democrats warn that such a cut could cripple local governments, some of which receives significant revenue from car fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Cathleen Decker
Last week brought a blizzard of polling on how Californians feel about their government and the economy. In two words: dislike and despair. The fine print suggested we should save a little distaste for ourselves. A survey by the Public Policy Institute of California found that, overwhelmingly, Californians want themselves -- not the governor or the Legislature -- to be in charge of big budget matters. It also found that, even more overwhelmingly, Californians haven't a clue where the state gets its money or how it spends it -- basic essentials for people who want to run the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2010 | Shane Goldmacher
Californians on Tuesday night were narrowly favoring new rules to make it easier to pass state budgets while rejecting a proposal to legalize marijuana. A push by Texas oil companies to suspend the state's landmark global-warming law was defeated. Voters approved a measure to give an independent panel new powers to draw congressional districts, but voted down a proposal for new car fees to fund state parks. Tens of millions of dollars were spent on a blizzard of television ads, mailers and automated "robocalls" to voters in recent weeks as campaigns scrambled to persuade the public.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2010 | David Lazarus
The tough economy has taken its toll on Altadena resident Efrain Rojas. The freelance graphic artist has put his car in storage to save money and now takes public transportation everywhere. Well, almost everywhere. "There's no practical way to get to West Los Angeles via public transit," Rojas, 37, told me. "The amount of time it takes, it's a soul-crushing experience. I've seen people literally break down and cry. So if I can avoid it, I don't even go there." Yes, Southern California has a public-transit network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Cathleen Decker
Last week brought a blizzard of polling on how Californians feel about their government and the economy. In two words: dislike and despair. The fine print suggested we should save a little distaste for ourselves. A survey by the Public Policy Institute of California found that, overwhelmingly, Californians want themselves -- not the governor or the Legislature -- to be in charge of big budget matters. It also found that, even more overwhelmingly, Californians haven't a clue where the state gets its money or how it spends it -- basic essentials for people who want to run the show.
OPINION
June 15, 2009
Re "Gov. ups the ante in state budget fight," June 11 "I always get my lessons from sports -- look at the Lakers," says our governor, about how California government should be run. "Look at all the great teams. When they are together and connected, then they have a better chance of winning." Athletes must obey the coach. The whole team must obey the owner. I thought American governments were the opposite: representative democracies. The governor should try reading some history, political science, philosophy, anything involving serious thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Rau is a Times staff writer.
In private negotiations over the state's budget crisis, a top Republican legislator has broached the most dreaded idea in GOP circles: taxes. The leader of the Assembly's Republicans, Mike Villines of Clovis, has publicly maintained the GOP's hard line against any tax increases. But last month, he volunteered to other legislative leaders and Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2008 | Evan Halper, Halper is a Times staff writer.
State lawmakers began moving toward a deal this week to close California's deficit with the help of steeper car fees that would cost many drivers hundreds of dollars annually, according to people involved in budget talks. Under the plan, GOP lawmakers -- most of whom have signed anti-tax pledges -- would vote to triple the vehicle license fee that owners pay when they register their cars every year in exchange for a ballot measure that would impose rigid limits on future state spending.
OPINION
June 15, 2009
Re "Gov. ups the ante in state budget fight," June 11 "I always get my lessons from sports -- look at the Lakers," says our governor, about how California government should be run. "Look at all the great teams. When they are together and connected, then they have a better chance of winning." Athletes must obey the coach. The whole team must obey the owner. I thought American governments were the opposite: representative democracies. The governor should try reading some history, political science, philosophy, anything involving serious thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991
I hope the Ventura County Board of Supervisors will finally see fit to stop the ongoing vehicle registration fee rip-off, starting with Dist. Atty. Michael Bradbury and his proposal. There is no question that auto theft is a problem. I haven't been bothered yet, though. I'm used to living within my means and have always driven used American cars. Get the point? Bummer about the budget problems in the D.A.'s office--but things are tough all over. NELS NORENE Camarillo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2008 | Richard Winton
Sheriff Lee Baca said an investigation into allegations that a sergeant stole more than $400,000 in car impound fees has prompted a review of the way his department handles such transactions for the dozens of cities it patrols. Baca said he plans to have the towing operators collect the administrative fees directly from motorists, rather than involving sheriff's officials. "I don't see the need for the department to be a cashier," he said. "The system has to be tightened." Sheriff's officials initiated the review after La Puente officials reported a significant shortfall in the fees that were supposed to have been collected by the Sheriff's Department, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2008 | margot roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Say you buy a car that coughs out a lot of greenhouse gases. Should you pay more for the privilege of polluting? And say your neighbor buys a car that spews out far less. Should he be rewarded for helping to save the planet? This week, the California Assembly is expected to vote on the California Clean Car Discount Act, which, if passed, would be the nation's first "feebate" law, imposing charges and granting rebates based on a vehicle's emission of carbon dioxide and other gases.
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