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Cara Beth Burnside

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SPORTS
January 31, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cara-Beth Burnside hung out with her older brothers a lot when she was young and impressionable and it wasn't long before she had left behind the games most little girls play. By 11, she had filled her room with trophies from skateboarding contests. These days, Burnside, 28, is leaving her impression on the pro snowboarding tour and sometimes--unintentionally--on the side of a mountain.
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SPORTS
August 4, 2005 | Ben Bolch
Cara-Beth Burnside has never been shy about going after what she really wanted. When she turned 10, her grandmother bought her a pair of roller skates, but Burnside had her heart set on a new skateboard to use at the skateboard park that had just opened near her home in Orange. So Burnside took her birthday money and bought one. And those roller skates? "I don't think I ever used them again," she said. "They just sat there collecting dust."
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SPORTS
August 4, 2005 | Ben Bolch
Cara-Beth Burnside has never been shy about going after what she really wanted. When she turned 10, her grandmother bought her a pair of roller skates, but Burnside had her heart set on a new skateboard to use at the skateboard park that had just opened near her home in Orange. So Burnside took her birthday money and bought one. And those roller skates? "I don't think I ever used them again," she said. "They just sat there collecting dust."
SPORTS
January 31, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cara-Beth Burnside hung out with her older brothers a lot when she was young and impressionable and it wasn't long before she had left behind the games most little girls play. By 11, she had filled her room with trophies from skateboarding contests. These days, Burnside, 28, is leaving her impression on the pro snowboarding tour and sometimes--unintentionally--on the side of a mountain.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roxy the cat had the right idea, curling up in the sock drawer for a midday snooze. A light rain was falling outside; Stevie Nicks was on the stereo. The moment couldn't be more mellow. "Mom! Mmmom!" Cara-Beth Burnside was shouting from the kitchen. Relax? Who had time? Burnside had a plane to catch. Bags to pack. Calls to make. Calls to take. Forget the rainy day atmosphere--a professional snowboarder like Burnside can't afford to snooze. "Mom!" Burnside moaned. "I think this camera's wrecked.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | ROSE APODACA-JONES
As girls and young women increasingly hit the pavement, female skate stars are now being born. Cara-Beth Burnside may still rule the ramps after almost two decades (she took home $1,000 from the Jam on Sunday), but other skating women are now demanding their own props. Meet the sport's new queen of the streets (who claimed her own $1,000 from the street course): Athlete: Elissa Steamer. Specialty: street skateboarding (as opposed to ramp). Age: 23--and not too hung up to reveal that fact.
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2007 | Elizabeth Khuri
Stefanie Thomas Hometown: Satellite Beach, Fla. When did you start skating? I was 12. I was always a tomboy and saw some kids skating and it looked fun. I bought a used board off one of the skaters near me. I made ramps out in front of my house and skated in front of my house, skated curbs, tricks off of ledges that were waist high. Any skate idols? Kris Markovich. He skates faster than anyone, and he's gnarly. * Pamela Brodowski Hometown: Cardiff-by-the-Sea When did you start skating? In 1996.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most important thing to know about the men's snowboarding halfpipe competition Thursday is who's not at the Winter Games. Norway's Terje Haakonsen. If you ask the Canadians, he's the Wayne Gretzky of the sport. If you ask the Americans, he's the Michael Jordan. "It's a disappointment for us that he's not here," the United States' leading medal contender, Todd Richards, said of the sport's most creative and artistic flier. "Naturally, we'd like for the best competition to be in the Olympics.
SPORTS
August 3, 2006 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Downtown construction has chewed up the parking lot at Staples Center, forcing X Games organizers to relocate several events to the Home Deport Center in Carson for this year's games, which run today through Sunday. The most prominent relocation is the seven-story tall mega ramp, which will be erected outside the Home Depot Center, which will also serve as home to the BMX park and the skateboard street courses.
SPORTS
August 4, 2006 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Women's skateboarders rode closer to X Games equality Thursday when Cara-Beth Burnside was awarded a $15,000 first prize for winning the women's vert competition at Staples Center. That was a $13,000 increase over last year's first prize and a $10,000 increase from the prize planned before Burnside and fellow skateboarder Mimi Knoop met Wednesday afternoon at Staples Center with ESPN executive John Skipper to discuss gender equity issues at the X Games.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roxy the cat had the right idea, curling up in the sock drawer for a midday snooze. A light rain was falling outside; Stevie Nicks was on the stereo. The moment couldn't be more mellow. "Mom! Mmmom!" Cara-Beth Burnside was shouting from the kitchen. Relax? Who had time? Burnside had a plane to catch. Bags to pack. Calls to make. Calls to take. Forget the rainy day atmosphere--a professional snowboarder like Burnside can't afford to snooze. "Mom!" Burnside moaned. "I think this camera's wrecked.
SPORTS
August 4, 2006
* What happened Thursday: Defending champion Cara-Beth Burnside of Encinitas overcame a severe migraine to win a gold medal and defend her title in the women's vert final at Staples Center. Mimi Knoop of Chesapeake, Va., won the silver medal and Karen Jones, a Brazilian who lives in Santo Andre, Spain, took the bronze. Sandro Dias, 31, won the men's vert final without even attempting a 900.
SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having bought into the Winter Olympic experience, halfpipe snowboarders had their chance Thursday to find out who among them were swifter, higher, stronger. But in the halfpipe specialists' first opportunity to gain widespread exposure around the world, most of the media were focused only on who was high. For the first Olympic gold medalists in the discipline, Switzerland's Gian Gimmen in the men's competition and Germany's Nicola Thost in the women's, that was too bad.
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