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Carbohydrates

HEALTH
August 26, 2002 | GREG FROST, REUTERS
In a finding that could lead to new treatments for arthritis, U.S. researchers said last week that naturally occurring carbohydrates may be the elusive cause of the illness. The carbohydrates, known as glycosaminoglycans, or GAGS, appear to activate cells that are part of the body's immune system, causing the painful inflammation that afflicts hundreds of millions of people around the world, they said.
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FOOD
May 8, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quark is a traditional German fresh cheese with the look and consistency of yogurt. Its flavor is mild and on the tangy side. Try substituting quark for yogurt in some of your favorite recipes to lower the calories, carbohydrates and sugar. Compared with nonfat yogurt, quark has 70 calories per half cup while yogurt can have as many as 130 calories. It is also considerably lower in carbohydrates and sugar.
HEALTH
April 22, 2002 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gale Cordell has never been seriously overweight. In fact, if you ate lunch with her, you would think she was a model eater. But the 57-year-old's ovo-lacto-vegetarian diet degenerates into chaotic, solitary chocolate candy binges when she's upset. With lots of exercise, Cordell managed to stay a size 6 for most of her adult life. But two years ago a stress fracture curtailed her exercise, and her eating got so out of control that she gained 35 pounds.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a food fight afoot over the last thing you'd imagine could inflame peoples' passions: a dull-as-dishwater government chart. It's a graphic that most of us know well: the food guide pyramid, that worthy, eat-right teaching tool from the U.S Department of Agriculture. Four levels. Five food groups. With--let's hear it, class--grains at the base. Fruits and vegetables one tier up. Next, the protein group, with dairy right next door.
HEALTH
November 29, 1999 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, WASHINGTON POST
For the thousands of people sticking to high-protein diets this past Thanksgiving weekend, dinner could have been reduced to just one course: turkey. No stuffing, no candied yams, mashed potatoes or pumpkin pie. These popular high-protein regimes urge adherents to gobble up meat, cheese, nuts and other sources of protein while slashing such carbohydrates as breads, grains, fruits and vegetables. High-protein diets are "really, really hot," says Katherine Tallmadge, a Washington, D.C., dietitian.
HEALTH
October 11, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Barry Sears disapproves of my breakfast. He is unimpressed by my lunch. And my afternoon snack is just awful. The breakfast: a toasted bagel, spread thickly with peanut butter. "What was it--one of those big L.A. bagels?" he asks. "Basically, what you had was the politically correct version of a Dunkin' Donut--the worst of all possible worlds. A lot of fat. And a lot of insulin. I bet that two hours after eating it you were famished again."
NEWS
May 3, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government, joined by an array of health and consumer groups, unveiled an education campaign Monday to encourage Americans to use the new, simpler nutritional labels that soon will be on all processed foods--from potato chips and candy to salad dressing and processed meat and poultry products. "The new food label represents nothing less than an enormous public health opportunity that comes only rarely," said David A. Kessler, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | DIANE DUSTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When you're dieting, there's nothing fun about going to a party only to spend the evening denying yourself the fattening goodies at the table. Potato chips, wieners wrapped in pastry, cheese and cracker trays. Caterer Robyn Webb is here to change all that. Of the more than 200 caterers in the party-intensive Washington area, she seems to be the only one serving exclusively low-fat foods.
MAGAZINE
January 12, 1992 | Charles Perry
They know what we want: wood ovens, olive oil and carbohydrates in myriad forms. We keep on going to Italian restaurants, and they keep on coming to us. Two of the latest literally came from out of town: Trilussa from Rome and Pane e Vino from Santa Barbara. Trilussa, where people used to dine on crepes when the place was a Magic Pan, now throngs with diners who look as if they've just blown a wad of lire on Rodeo Drive.
FOOD
December 28, 1989 | JEAN CARPER, Carper is a medical and nutrition writer
A holiday cookie may be just what your body needs this time of year to lift your mood. So says Dr. Norman Rosenthal, a psychiatrist and depression expert at the National Institute of Mental Health. He finds that about 35 million Americans tend to get depressed during the winter because of changes in brain chemistry related to decreased sunlight. He also finds that eating sweets and starches--carbohydrates--during winter helps relieve their depression.
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