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HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most Americans eat between 250 and 300 grams of carbohydrates a day, the equivalent of 1,000 to 1,200 calories. The Institute of Medicine, which sets dietary nutrient requirements, recommends 130 grams a day. Some, such as Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, say achieving that would be a big step in the right direction, but other low-carb advocates believe the number is too inflexible. "What people can tolerate varies widely based on age, metabolism, activity level, body size and gender," says Dr. Stephen Phinney, nutritional biochemist and an emeritus professor of UC Davis.
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SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Tucking into a breakfast of buttermilk pancakes and maple syrup, or a great bowl of white pasta for lunch, not only sends your blood sugar soaring--and then, suddenly, plummeting. Four hours after you've put down your fork, such a meal makes you hungrier than if you'd eaten one with more protein and fiber and fewer carbohydrates, a new study finds. The study also demonstrates that four hours later, the echo of that meal activates regions of the brain associated with craving and reward seeking more powerfully than does a meal with a lower "glycemic load.
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NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
About a week before I started my “experiment,” as I have fondly dubbed my monthlong locavore diet, I began researching where I could buy wheat and other grains. As carbs are my favorite food group, it was of utmost importance that I manage to get my bread fix during June. Because it seemed impossible to find a wheat farm within my 100-mile radius, I settled for the idea of requiring that my flour be milled within my parameters, but not necessarily grown there. My mother recalled that there was a mill in Los Angeles, El Molino Viejo , that ground local wheat, but, a quick Google search later, I discovered that it no longer runs.
HEALTH
December 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
At first glance, Susan and Herb Eckerling's kitchen doesn't look that bad, food-wise. A bowl of fresh fruit graces the tan tile counter, there's leftover steamed cauliflower in the refrigerator and some quick-cooking oats in the pantry. But scratch the surface and signs of poor choices and unnecessary deprivations emerge: Susan's diet is extremely short on whole grains, and neither eats much red meat - even though they like it - because they fear every cut is bad for their health.
HEALTH
December 8, 2012
Ruffles Cheddar & Sour Cream Serving size: 11 chips Sodium: 180 milligrams Fat: 10 grams Carbs: 15 g Protein: 2 g Calories: 160   Terra Thai Basil Curry Exotic Vegetable Chips Serving size: 15 chips Sodium: 100 mg Fat: 8 g Carbs: 18 g Protein: 0 g Calories: 140   Crisproot Sea Salt Casava Chips Serving size: 23 chips Sodium: 150 mg Fat: 7 g Carbs: 18 g...
HEALTH
February 25, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Special to The Times
You're at mile 20 in the marathon, feeling no pain, striding at a comfortable pace, wind at your back. Suddenly you feel a wave of fatigue so strong it's as if your body wants to melt into the pavement. Then comes a rush of dizziness -- and disorientation. You've hit the wall. The bane of long-distance runners and endurance athletes, the dreaded wall can derail the best marathon plans. But it's neither inevitable nor insurmountable.
NEWS
June 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The debate over high-protein, high-fat diets versus high-carb, low-fat diets may never be settled. But the book "Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It" makes a solid case for upping the protein and excising some carbs, such as starchy vegetables and sugar-laden foods. The book's author, Gary Taubes, talks about his take on diet and nutrition in a live Web chat on Monday at 11 a.m. Pacific Time (1 p.m. Central Time, 2 p.m. Eastern Time). Taubes is a contributing correspondent for the journal Science and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Independent Investigator in Health Policy Research at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | Tammy Worth
Fifty-six-year-old Lynn Kaufman of Los Angeles has maintained a healthful weight on Weight Watchers for 10 years. But she was snacking way too much on the wrong kind of stuff, she says ? like 100-calorie cookie packs and hot chocolate. Today she jokes that Weight Watchers must have been spying on her. "I think there was a video camera in my house and they said, 'We don't like the quality of the food you are eating.'" In November, Weight Watchers unveiled its new point system, PointsPlus, to its 1.3 million members worldwide.
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
With nutrition information everywhere, why is it still hard to figure out how many calories we should eat? Join a live Web chat with "The Biggest Loser" nutritionist Cheryl Forberg on Monday, June 27, at 11 a.m. PT (2 p.m. CT, 3 p.m. ET) and learn how to devise a sensible nutrition plan that's easy to follow. Forberg is a registered dietitian and trained chef who graduated from the California Culinary Academy. She's also the author of "Flavor First: Cut Calories and Boost Flavor with 75 Delicious, All-Natural Recipes," which shows how healthful, flavorful food can taste just as good as highly processed, fattier fare.
TRAVEL
February 10, 2013 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
PORTLAND, Ore. - Is it possible for an Angeleno to leave home and find love in a region where sunshine is merely a rumor and 50 shades of gray are a daily atmospheric reality? It's helpful if the pursuit of that bliss involves a white-hot controversy that upon occasion dominates headlines and ensnares academics, government officials and medical researchers. I am speaking, of course, of carbohydrate love. Portland - where the constantly caffeinated seem to have an ever-growing selection of pastries to consume with their coffee - is a logical destination.
SCIENCE
January 23, 2013 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Long ago, some brazen wolves started hanging around human settlements, jump-starting events that ultimately led to today's domesticated dogs. Now geneticists say they have identified one of the key changes that turned wolves into the tame, tail-wagging creatures well-suited to living by our sides - the ability to digest carbohydrates with ease. The report, published online Wednesday by the journal Nature, found signs that dogs can break down starch into sugar, and then transport those sugars from the gut into the bloodstream, more efficiently than can wolves.
HEALTH
December 8, 2012
Ruffles Cheddar & Sour Cream Serving size: 11 chips Sodium: 180 milligrams Fat: 10 grams Carbs: 15 g Protein: 2 g Calories: 160   Terra Thai Basil Curry Exotic Vegetable Chips Serving size: 15 chips Sodium: 100 mg Fat: 8 g Carbs: 18 g Protein: 0 g Calories: 140   Crisproot Sea Salt Casava Chips Serving size: 23 chips Sodium: 150 mg Fat: 7 g Carbs: 18 g...
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Eat carbs. Don't eat carbs. Eat as little fat as possible. Cut out white food. Eat like the Greeks. No, eat like paleolithic humans. Eat less, move more. The advice can be dizzying; and what's more, the experts still don't know exactly what to recommend, says a writer who cofounded an initiative that plans to try to find some answers. “The government advice - eat less and exercise more - they don't know if that's right, says Gary Taubes, author of “Why We Get Fat” and “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and founder with Dr. Peter Attia of the Nutrition Science Initiative.
HEALTH
July 21, 2012 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Why is it that we crave chocolate chip cookies rather than chard? Or bread instead of broccoli? Take heart: It's biological. "Our attraction to sweets - and salt, carbohydrates and fat - is hard-wired from the Stone Age," says Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University's Prevention Research Center. Back then, food cravings were reliable signals to our ancestors to seek out certain foods that would provide energy (sugar, fat) and essential minerals (salt). "Today, food is plentiful and it's easy to avoid physical activity, but we've preserved craving tendencies because evolution is very slow," Katz says.
HEALTH
December 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
At first glance, Susan and Herb Eckerling's kitchen doesn't look that bad, food-wise. A bowl of fresh fruit graces the tan tile counter, there's leftover steamed cauliflower in the refrigerator and some quick-cooking oats in the pantry. But scratch the surface and signs of poor choices and unnecessary deprivations emerge: Susan's diet is extremely short on whole grains, and neither eats much red meat - even though they like it - because they fear every cut is bad for their health.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Eat carbs. Don't eat carbs. Eat as little fat as possible. Cut out white food. Eat like the Greeks. No, eat like paleolithic humans. Eat less, move more. The advice can be dizzying; and what's more, the experts still don't know exactly what to recommend, says a writer who cofounded an initiative that plans to try to find some answers. “The government advice - eat less and exercise more - they don't know if that's right, says Gary Taubes, author of “Why We Get Fat” and “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and founder with Dr. Peter Attia of the Nutrition Science Initiative.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If shopping is a sport, does that mean you can burn serious calories doing it? Yes, and that's good news to all you Black Friday and weekend shoppers hitting the stores. An average 150-pound person can burn about 470 to 500 calories in three hours shopping -- not too shabby and no doubt needed after yesterday's turkey, stuffing and pie, which, for some, totaled thousands of calories. But you augment that by thinking of your shopping expedition as a workout sans gym. We spoke with Studio City-based personal trainer Robert Reames of Gold's Gym Fitness Institute about how to maximize those hours in the mall.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
An intermittent low-carb diet could be better than a standard low-calorie Mediterranean diet for weight loss and lowering insulin, a study finds. Low-carb diets have been shown in a number of studies to be superior to regular low-calorie diets for various weight health outcomes, but they're notoriously difficult to stick to for a number of people. In this study, researchers followed 115 women who had a family history of breast cancer for four months as they were randomly assigned to one of three diet programs.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If shopping is a sport, does that mean you can burn serious calories doing it? Yes, and that's good news to all you Black Friday and weekend shoppers hitting the stores. An average 150-pound person can burn about 470 to 500 calories in three hours shopping -- not too shabby and no doubt needed after yesterday's turkey, stuffing and pie, which, for some, totaled thousands of calories. But you augment that by thinking of your shopping expedition as a workout sans gym. We spoke with Studio City-based personal trainer Robert Reames of Gold's Gym Fitness Institute about how to maximize those hours in the mall.
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