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Carcinogens

NEWS
August 27, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ending a bitter fight over diesel exhaust, the California Air Resources Board today is expected to declare diesel soot a cancer-causing pollutant after industry leaders and environmentalists struck a deal that quells nearly a decade of intense opposition. The agreement is an unusual compromise in a war of words that has endured for nine years--the time that state environmental officials have spent reviewing the dangers that trucks, buses and other diesel engines pose to public health.
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NEWS
May 19, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers wearing protective "moon suits" and backed up by volunteer firefighters Friday removed 13,000 bushels of what could be the most toxic grain ever tested from an Iowa farm and trucked it to a hazardous waste dump near here. The delicate $90,000 operation took place more than two months after Iowa officials declared the corn--tainted by a mold-induced carcinogen called aflatoxin--a "hazardous material," the same designation reserved for dangerous chemicals and industrial pollutants.
HEALTH
May 6, 2002 | CRAIG STOLTZ and SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
It was widely reported last week that Swedish researchers had discovered that some highly starchy cooked foods, including potato chips, French fries, biscuits and bread, contained a chemical called acrylamide--a probable cause of human cancer. You have questions? So glad you asked. Question: Oh boy, another food scare. So you're going to tell me not to eat bread or French fries? Answer: No way.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the barbecue--bundling your steaks in aluminum foil and keeping fat far from the flames--scientists are surfacing like party poopers with more bad news about grilled meat and cancer. The latest worry is a class of chemicals produced during the cooking of muscle meats like beef, pork, chicken and fish. In laboratory tests and animal studies, the chemicals have been found to damage genetic material and to be carcinogenic.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quietly last spring, a panel of state-appointed scientists unanimously concluded that one of the world's most widely prescribed anti-cancer drugs, tamoxifen, can itself cause cancer. This finding would normally mean that tamoxifen, which has been prescribed worldwide to about 3 million women with breast cancer, would be added to the governor's list of 404 chemicals "known to the state to cause cancer." But the drug has not been listed. Instead, under pressure from the drug maker and the National Cancer Institute and after personal intervention by the governor, the Wilson Administration has delayed a decision indefinitely.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp on Wednesday sued four medical and food sterilization firms in Los Angeles and Orange counties, saying they have exposed an estimated 3 million people to emissions of toxic ethylene oxide, a potent carcinogen that also can cause reproductive abnormalities. In the most sweeping lawsuits ever filed under Proposition 65, the 1986 anti-toxics measure, Van de Kamp charged that the companies failed to adequately warn the public of possible exposure to the toxic gas.
SCIENCE
February 2, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smoking a joint is equivalent to 20 cigarettes in terms of lung cancer risk, New Zealand scientists have found, as they warned of an "epidemic" of lung cancers linked to cannabis. In a report in the European Respiratory Journal, the scientists said that cannabis could be expected to harm the airways more than tobacco because its smoke contains twice the level of carcinogens, such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The method of smoking also increases the risk, since joints are typically smoked without a filter and almost to the very tip, which increases the amount of smoke inhaled.
OPINION
February 1, 2006
Re "Traces of Prescription Drugs Found in Southland Aquifers," Jan. 30 Prescription drugs in reclaimed water -- that's no surprise. The National Research Council, in a 1998 study, indicated that reclaimed water is unsafe for drinking because the technology does not exist to test for thousands of potential toxins and carcinogens that can survive the reclamation process. Instead of waiting for the other shoe to drop, water districts should be considering technologies, such as desalination, that are now less expensive and produce safer water.
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