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Carcinogens

NEWS
February 21, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-five years ago, combative New York Rep. James J. Delaney succeeded in attaching a landmark amendment to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, banning the use of food additives known to cause cancer in laboratory animals or humans. The so-called "Delaney clause," has not achieved the sweeping force Delaney intended because government regulation has been spotty and Delaney's meaning disputed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two public drinking water wells in Costa Mesa and Huntington Beach have been shut down because a suspected cancer-causing chemical was unknowingly injected into the local water supply, Orange County Water District officials said Wednesday. NDMA, or n-nitrosodimethylamine, is a ubiquitous chemical that occurs naturally, but also is a byproduct of chlorinating water supplies to disinfect them.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Dow Chemical Co. subsidiary, acknowledging it used a cancer-causing chemical to manufacture a popular spot remover, has agreed to contribute $50,000 to help environmentalists pursue violations of the state's toxic chemical laws, two environmental groups announced Wednesday. In an unprecedented settlement of a Proposition 65 enforcement action, DowBrands Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State water regulators Monday released a list of 142 San Fernando Valley sites where they have asked property owners to help determine whether chromium 6 may have been discharged in ways that contributed to soil and ground water contamination. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board sent letters to the Valley businesses on Nov. 8 to help pinpoint the source of pollution by chromium 6, a suspected carcinogen featured in the film "Erin Brockovich."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles and other cities consider the costs of tougher drinking-water standards for chromium 6, a draft report says there is no proven treatment for reducing the suspected carcinogen to the trace levels recommended by a state health agency for optimum safety.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Ending a bitter fight over diesel exhaust, the California Air Resources Board today is expected to declare diesel soot a cancer-causing pollutant after industry leaders and environmentalists struck a deal that quells nearly a decade of intense opposition. The agreement is an unusual compromise in a war of words that has endured for nine years--the time that state environmental officials have spent reviewing the dangers that trucks, buses and other diesel engines pose to public health.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2006 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency has tentatively agreed to new restrictions that will allow a Southern California pesticide maker to keep a controversial insecticide on the market, the agency announced Tuesday. Newport Beach-based Amvac volunteered to cancel some uses and add restrictions to others for a pesticide known as dichlorvos, or DDVP, which is commonly used to kill mosquitoes, fleas and other insects, the EPA said.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers wearing protective "moon suits" and backed up by volunteer firefighters Friday removed 13,000 bushels of what could be the most toxic grain ever tested from an Iowa farm and trucked it to a hazardous waste dump near here. The delicate $90,000 operation took place more than two months after Iowa officials declared the corn--tainted by a mold-induced carcinogen called aflatoxin--a "hazardous material," the same designation reserved for dangerous chemicals and industrial pollutants.
HEALTH
May 6, 2002 | CRAIG STOLTZ and SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
It was widely reported last week that Swedish researchers had discovered that some highly starchy cooked foods, including potato chips, French fries, biscuits and bread, contained a chemical called acrylamide--a probable cause of human cancer. You have questions? So glad you asked. Question: Oh boy, another food scare. So you're going to tell me not to eat bread or French fries? Answer: No way.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the barbecue--bundling your steaks in aluminum foil and keeping fat far from the flames--scientists are surfacing like party poopers with more bad news about grilled meat and cancer. The latest worry is a class of chemicals produced during the cooking of muscle meats like beef, pork, chicken and fish. In laboratory tests and animal studies, the chemicals have been found to damage genetic material and to be carcinogenic.
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