Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCard Inc
IN THE NEWS

Card Inc

BUSINESS
November 6, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A NextCard Inc. shareholder sued the largest Internet credit card issuer and its officers, accusing them of trying to profit by misleading investors about the company's prospects for 2000 and 2001. NextCard Chief Executive John Hashman, Chairman Jeremy Lent, President Yinzi Cai and board member Safi Qureshey artificially inflated the stock so they could sell their shares for $9million, Russell Ballati alleged in papers filed in San Francisco federal court.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
Signaling their intent to crack down on corporate coverups, federal authorities Thursday arrested a former Ernst & Young partner on charges the accountant tampered with records providing insights into the collapse of online credit card issuer NextCard Inc. Thomas Trauger, who oversaw Ernst & Young's financial audits of NextCard, is accused of altering key financial documents after banking regulators raised doubts about the San Francisco-based company's accounting practices in October 2001.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The fallout from the February failure of online credit card issuer NextCard Inc. will land on about 800,000 customers today when federal regulators close their accounts, abruptly cutting them off from some incentive programs that reward their past spending. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., which has has been overseeing the business since regulators seized the accounts Feb. 7, waited until Tuesday to tell NextCard customers their Visa credit cards would become worthless today.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. regulators Wednesday recommended tighter lending standards for credit card issuers such as Citigroup Inc. and MBNA Corp., saying they've made it too easy for consumers to accumulate debt that the banks may have to write off. Regulators, including the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., said issuers should raise minimum payment requirements and reduce late fees to help consumers pay off principals faster.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2004 | From Associated Press
Securities regulators on Tuesday sued the management team behind the rapid rise and fall of online credit lender NextCard Inc., alleging the company's top executives cooked the books and then scrambled to sell their stock before the ruse unraveled into financial ruin. The civil complaint filed Tuesday by the Securities and Exchange Commission continues the government's effort to clean up one of the dot-com bust's biggest debacles.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2006 | From Reuters
Retailers that won a $3-billion antitrust settlement from Visa USA and MasterCard International Inc. are questioning a bid by the U.S. government to get a share of the settlement money. In a Feb. 1 letter to the judge overseeing the case, the lead attorney representing the retailers said there was a "serious question" about whether the Justice Department and the U.S. Postal Service, which had filed claims Jan. 27, should be given a piece of the landmark settlement.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
MasterCard International Inc. and Visa International Inc. lost a bid to dismiss a lawsuit accusing them of conspiring to impose hidden fees of as much as $4 billion on cardholders who make purchases overseas. U.S. District Judge William Pauley in New York last week refused to dismiss several antitrust claims in the case. In April, a California judge said the companies must provide refunds for the fees on overseas purchases, a ruling that could cost them $800 million. A lawyer for Purchase, N.Y.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Visa International Inc. and MasterCard International Inc. can place notices in newspapers and monthly credit card bills telling customers how to claim $800 million in refunds, a California judge said. Judge Ronald Sabraw's tentative ruling in Oakland was a partial victory for Visa and MasterCard, the two largest credit card companies, in a case over refunds for foreign exchange fees collected since 1996.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|