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Cardboard Arcade

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2012 | Sandy Banks
There's no sign of Caine Monroy's game arcade when I pull up to his father's Boyle Heights auto parts shop. The 9-year-old is taking his show on the road, enjoying the perks of becoming a viral video star. He and his dad will be at the Exploratorium museum in San Francisco this weekend, so Caine can explain to geeked-up science fans how he turned a bunch of cardboard boxes into an elaborate arcade and social network phenomenon. "They sent a 17-foot semi truck and loaded everything up," Caine's father, George Monroy told me. Next, Caine's headed to New York City, for a meeting with an arcade company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2012 | Sandy Banks
There's no sign of Caine Monroy's game arcade when I pull up to his father's Boyle Heights auto parts shop. The 9-year-old is taking his show on the road, enjoying the perks of becoming a viral video star. He and his dad will be at the Exploratorium museum in San Francisco this weekend, so Caine can explain to geeked-up science fans how he turned a bunch of cardboard boxes into an elaborate arcade and social network phenomenon. "They sent a 17-foot semi truck and loaded everything up," Caine's father, George Monroy told me. Next, Caine's headed to New York City, for a meeting with an arcade company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
On a rainy afternoon, 9-year-old Caine Monroy was doing a brisk business at the cardboard arcade he built in his dad's auto parts store in Boyle Heights. Devon Gomez, a 20-year-old student at Pasadena City College, was battling the claw machine — a cardboard box fitted with an S-ring attached to a piece of yarn — trying to win a toy for his girlfriend. "I'm going in on this," said Gomez, taking off his hat after buying a $2 "fun pass," good for 500 turns. "Bring it on," said Caine, wearing a red hooded sweat shirt with the words "Caine's Arcade" printed in black on the front.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
On a rainy afternoon, 9-year-old Caine Monroy was doing a brisk business at the cardboard arcade he built in his dad's auto parts store in Boyle Heights. Devon Gomez, a 20-year-old student at Pasadena City College, was battling the claw machine — a cardboard box fitted with an S-ring attached to a piece of yarn — trying to win a toy for his girlfriend. "I'm going in on this," said Gomez, taking off his hat after buying a $2 "fun pass," good for 500 turns. "Bring it on," said Caine, wearing a red hooded sweat shirt with the words "Caine's Arcade" printed in black on the front.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Nine-year-old Caine Monroy is totally nonplussed by the attention his homemade cardboard arcade received this week after the short film "Caine's Arcade" went viral on the Internet. The documentary was directed by Nirvan Mullick, an L.A. filmmaker who happened upon Caine's cardboard arcade when he tried to buy a car handle for his '96 Corolla from Caine's dad's auto parts shop. The heartwarming 11-minute film got a combined 3.5 million views on Vimeo and YouTube in just four days.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
"Caine's Arcade" -- a short film about a 9-year-old boy who built an elaborate cardboard arcade in his dad's used auto parts store in East L.A. -- is one of the sweetest videos we've seen all year. And now it's going viral: The 11-minute video has picked up 1 million views on Vimeo in just two days, and another 438,000 views on YouTube. "Caine is a killer," filmmaker Nirvan Mullick, who directed the video, wrote in a recent tweet. "He has been making thousands of grown men weep at work.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
"Caine's Arcade," a short film about 9-year-old Caine Monroy and the cardboard arcade that he created in his dad's used auto parts store, went viral this week, getting 1 million views in just two days on Vimeo.  In the 11-minute short, filmmaker Nirvan Mullick gives viewers a glimpse of Monroy's ingenuity -- how he made a claw machine out of an S-hook and a piece of yarn, and made fun passes that can be verified by pressing the square root...
BUSINESS
April 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
The saga of Caine's Arcade -- the cardboard game palace built by 9-year-old Caine Monroy in his dad's Boyle Heights auto parts store -- is not over yet. Filmmaker Nirvan Mallick, who shot the 11-minute viral video that made Caine a star, would argue that it is just beginning, in fact. On Thursday, Caine and his dad and Mallick sent the entirety of Caine's cardboard arcade in a big rig up to the Exploratorium, a hands-on children's science museum in San Francisco. It arrived at the museum early Friday morning, and on Saturday, Caine himself will arrive to set up and run his games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
We see a video on the Internet and it makes us melt or fume or cry. Sometimes, we respond en masse and change lives overnight. Thanks to one video campaign, a 9-year-old boy who made a cardboard arcade in East L.A. has received more than enough money to one day go to college. Thanks to another, a 68-year-old school bus monitor verbally bullied by a pack of middle schoolers probably now can afford to get off the bus for good. We see things on the screen and we act, in part because it's so easy.
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