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HEALTH
March 26, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A relatively inexpensive drug already on the market could prevent as many as 100,000 heart attacks in the United States each year, researchers reported last week. The drug is clopidogrel, a blood thinner now used to stave off clotting in patients undergoing angioplasty. For people who suffer mild heart attacks or ominous chest pain, it could be the biggest advance in heart care since the widespread introduction of prophylactic aspirin therapy, experts said. "This is a breakthrough," said Dr.
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NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A representative for Serena Williams told reporters Wednesday that the tennis star was receiving treatment for a pulmonary embolism she suffered last week.  Here's what that means:  FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this report incorrectly referred to the American College of Cardiology as the American College of Cardiologists. A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot, usually originating in a vein in the upper thigh, that breaks loose and travels to a lung.  Classically, a person develops a pulmonary embolism when he or she has risk factors for the problem — including pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives, clotting problems and obesity — and then remains sedentary for a period of time, allowing blood to stagnate in the leg and form a clot.
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NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A representative for Serena Williams told reporters Wednesday that the tennis star was receiving treatment for a pulmonary embolism she suffered last week.  Here's what that means:  FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this report incorrectly referred to the American College of Cardiology as the American College of Cardiologists. A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot, usually originating in a vein in the upper thigh, that breaks loose and travels to a lung.  Classically, a person develops a pulmonary embolism when he or she has risk factors for the problem — including pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives, clotting problems and obesity — and then remains sedentary for a period of time, allowing blood to stagnate in the leg and form a clot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Richard J. Bing of La Cañada Flintridge got good and mad at his power company last month and fired off a letter to the editor to share his tale of woe. "I know injustice when I see it," said Bing, whose venting was made all the more impressive by his age. "I am a retired, 100-year-old physician. " If I were so lucky as to ever see 100, I'd want it to be like this — still throwing punches. I called Bing, who explained in a German accent that SoCal Edison cut off power in his neighborhood Aug. 2 to make repairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A study of 220,000 Medicare patients found that heart attack victims are more likely to survive if treated by cardiologists rather than general doctors. The findings, which raise concern about insurance companies' growing reliance on primary care doctors, are published in the Dec. 19 New England Journal of Medicine. To hold down costs, managed-care insurance plans often require that patients be seen by primary care doctors before being referred to specialists, such as cardiologists.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | From Associated Press
A new approach to keeping arteries flowing smoothly after angioplasty shows astonishing success in early testing, apparently solving a major shortcoming of this common procedure. Doctors on Sunday released the longest follow-up with the new technique--the drug-coated stent. In testing on 43 patients over two years, they found it to be 100% effective, an accomplishment almost unheard of in medicine.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
Martin Schickman, 67, a clinical professor of cardiology and assistant dean for postgraduate education at the UCLA School of Medicine and an expert on hypertension. He also was director of the UCLA Extension Department of Continuing Education in Health Sciences and director of the UCLA portion of the Central San Joaquin Valley Area Health Education Center, a joint venture between UCLA and UC San Francisco medical schools. He also was a former president of the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1999
Cardiology Consultants Medical Group of the Valley, affiliated with Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, has opened an Agoura office at 29525 Canwood St., Suite 101. Consultation and treatment services will be available at the new office under the direction of Dr. Ben Simon, director of cardiac intensive care at the medical center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1992
Dr. Gerald Cotler, who served as director of cardiology at Encino Hospital for 20 years, has died at his Hidden Hills home. He was 59. Cotler died Sunday of complications of a brain tumor, said his wife, Elaine Cotler. Born in Philadelphia, Cotler completed his undergraduate work and medical school studies at Temple University in his hometown. He came to California in 1956 and performed his internship, residency and fellowship at Los Angeles County General Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1987 | Bill Billiter \f7
An Irvine real estate financing executive has donated $100,000 to the UC Irvine College of Medicine to create a research fellowship in the division of cardiology, the university announced Tuesday. The endowment is from Ed McGrath, founder and owner of the McGrath Co., an Irvine-based real estate financing company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2009 | Harriet Ryan and Andrew Blankstein
Armed with a search warrant indicating that Michael Jackson's death is being investigated as a manslaughter, a team of Los Angeles Police Department detectives and federal drug agents swooped into the Houston medical clinic operated by the pop star's personal physician Wednesday and seized documents and computer files. The warrant signed by a Harris County District Court judge and executed on the offices of Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
The program to train cardiologists at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center has been stripped of its national accreditation by the Chicago-based Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The decision, which takes effect in a year, marks the first time a residency or fellowship program at the Boyle Heights facility has lost accreditation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
UCI Medical Center's top cardiologist could lose his position under rule changes state regulators proposed Wednesday, saying the exemption he received to get his job was not intended to be used that way. Neither Dr. Jagat Narula, chairman of the medical center's cardiology department, nor the associate chief, Dr. Mani Vannan, holds a California medical license or American board certifications.
HEALTH
January 5, 2004 | Daniel Costello
"An entire hospital dedicated to fighting heart disease" goes the motto at Bakersfield Heart Hospital, a two-story red-and-beige building with a glass exterior that resembles a modern bus terminal more than a hospital. Inside, the art-filled lobby gleams and the hospital hums with efficiency. There is a lot for patients to like here. The hospital's 47 rooms -- all singles -- are spacious and decorated in calming tones.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Chelation for heart disease is usually mentioned in the same breath as laetrile for cancer -- dubious therapies used by fringe doctors and desperate patients. But some influential medical experts have decided it's time to give chelation a fair shake. Under the auspices of the federal government, the researchers have organized a five-year, $30-million study to determine if chelation is a safe and effective treatment for coronary artery disease.
HEALTH
September 2, 2002 | MAURA KELLY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A six-month regimen of folic acid, vitamin B-12 and vitamin B-6 can help prevent reoccurrence of arterial blockage in patients who have undergone coronary angioplasty, a study has found. The findings, reported last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., are an extension of a clinical trial that examined effects of the vitamin combination on treating heart disease. The treatment apparently works by lowering levels of homocysteine, an amino acid long implicated in heart attacks. Dr.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Albert A. Kattus, former chief of cardiology at UCLA School of Medicine and a pioneer in using exercise for rehabilitation and prevention of heart disease, has died. He was 78. Kattus died March 8 in El Cajon of complications of Alzheimer's disease, his wife, Mary, said Friday. In addition to several scholarly studies and a book for doctors about his work with heart patients, Kattus was coauthor of a popular book, "The Cardiologists' Guide to Fitness & Health Through Exercise."
NEWS
July 31, 1990
Louis Everett Martin, a pioneer Los Angeles internist and cardiologist who was among the first West Coast physicians to devise surgical procedures for congenital heart defects in so-called "blue babies," has died in Los Angeles. He was 91. He was one of the founders of The Medical Group on West 6th Street and a senior staff physician at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan and County-USC Medical Center. Martin, who died July 24, also founded the cardiac clinic at Childrens Hospital.
HEALTH
June 17, 2002 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you are rushed to an American hospital today with chest pain caused by clogged arteries to your heart, the chances are good that you will get an artery-opening procedure called angioplasty, and the insertion of a tiny, mesh-like device called a stent to keep your arteries open. If you had the same symptoms in Europe, you'd still get angioplasty, but with an important twist.
HEALTH
April 8, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blacks in the United States are more likely than whites to die of heart disease--and at a younger age--and yet no one can say precisely why. Although earlier diagnosis and improved treatment have contributed to an overall decline in U.S. death rates from cardiovascular illnesses during the past 30 years, blacks haven't shared in those improvements. They continue to suffer high rates of potentially fatal cardiovascular diseases like hypertension and stroke.
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