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Cardiovascular Disease

NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
African American adults who were counseled to eat more produce and get more exercise as ways to reduce their chances of getting cancer and heart disease ate more fruit over the course of a month, researchers said. But they didn't exercise or up their consumption of vegetables, according to the work presented Wednesday at the American Assn. for Cancer Research meeting in Anaheim. The work was looking at the notion that a greater effect could be achieved if people understood that one risky behavior - a poor diet, for instance - is associated with the chance of developing multiple diseases, said Melanie Jefferson of the Medical University of South Carolina, the lead researcher.
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NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
It's no surprise that someone who has never smoked, who eats a Mediterranean diet and keeps a normal weight and who exercises regularly is healthy. How healthy? Chances of death from all causes is reduced by 80% over eight years. Pretty healthy. Those four healthy behaviors also protected against heart disease and the buildup of calcium deposits in the arteries, the researchers said. Those are the results of a multiyear study of more than 6,000 people led by Johns Hopkins University researchers and published online Monday in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
These days, thanks to advances in treatment and detection, millions of women survive breast cancer.   But surviving the disease doesn't necessarily mean the entire battle is over, a population-based study of breast cancer survivors in Sweden and Denmark, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , seems to suggest. Assessing a total of 2,168 women whose breast cancer was treated with radiation therapy between 1958 and 2001, a team of researchers found that women's chances of having a major coronary event - a heart attack, bypass surgery or heart disease death - rose in proportion with the radiation dose they received, even at the lower doses of radiation delivered in newer treatments.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Black men and women are twice as likely to die from coronary heart disease as white men and women, according to a study led by University of Alabama doctors. Death rates from heart attacks and coronary heart disease have fallen since the 1970s, but that statement rings far truer for whites than for blacks. Studies have shown a widening gap between whites and blacks in heart disease deaths and in heart-attack hospitalizations, and new research pins down just how deadly that difference is. A paper published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | STEVE EMMONS
The prognosis for Alzheimer's patients nowadays is still not good. Cognex, the one drug approved to treat the condition, only relieves symptoms. But, according to Carl W. Cotman, a prominent psychobiologist who directs UC Irvine's research into Alzheimer's, efforts toward understanding the disease "are going like gangbusters. It's an amazing rate of progress." Drugs that may slow the disease are being tested.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Earlier this week, researchers reported that skipping breakfast was linked to heart disease. A few days later comes word that skipping breakfast could be a good weight-loss strategy because people don't make up for all those calories later in the day. Should we tear our hair out in frustration? Or cozy up to the scrambled eggs? “I'm very concerned about that. We in nutrition seem to put out contradictory diet messages,” said David Levitsky, a Cornell professor of nutritional sciences and psychology and the senior author of the breakfast and calories study.
SCIENCE
February 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a finding certain to put new pressure on the purveyors of sugary foods and drinks, a worldwide analysis shows that regardless of its effect on obesity, the ebb and flow of sugar in a country's diet strongly influences the diabetes rate there. The new study provides compelling evidence that obesity isn't driving the worldwide pandemic of Type 2 diabetes as much as the rising consumption of sugar - largely in the form of sweetened sodas, experts said. Increases in sugar intake account for a third of new cases of diabetes in the United States and a quarter of cases worldwide, according to calculations published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. In the 175 countries studied, a 150-calorie daily increase in the availability of sugar - about the equivalent of a can of Coke or Pepsi - raises the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes by 1.1%, a research team from Stanford University and UC San Francisco found.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JEFF DONN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Paul W. Ewald's best thinking started with an attack of diarrhea on a field trip to Kansas. A zoologist, he was studying the social habits of sparrows. But during that ordeal 24 years ago, he had time to ponder other things: Was his personal predicament simply the havoc of a germ bent on spreading itself around? Or was his body trying to flush away the germ? Was this the evolutionary adaptation of an invader or the evolved human defense against it?
FOOD
November 3, 1988 | TONI TIPTON
Here is a glossary of terms frequently used in discussions of cardiovascular disease and risk factors for that illness. Also included are definitions for a variety of the fiber foods often mentioned in relation to this disease and its prevention. Atherosclerosis: A disease that begins early in life with the formation of cholesterol-containing plaque or fatty streaks on the inner walls of the arteries, eventually narrowing them and inhibiting blood flow.
NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Sweet potatoes are often regarded as a healthier alternative to the white potato, which has been recently maligned as “Public Enemy No. 1” in America’s battle of the bulge. Some would even say that sweet potatoes are to white potatoes what brown rice is to white. But in a head-to-head comparison, these two tubers are seemingly very similar. In a 100-gram portion, the white potato has 92 calories, 21 grams of carbs, 2.3 grams of dietary fiber, 2.3 g of protein and 17% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C. The same amount of sweet potato, on the other hand, has 90 calories, 21 grams of carbs, 3 grams of fiber, 2 grams of protein, 35% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C and 380% of the daily recommended value of vitamin A. Importantly, both have won Vegetable of the Month designations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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