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Cardiovascular Disease

NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
African American adults who were counseled to eat more produce and get more exercise as ways to reduce their chances of getting cancer and heart disease ate more fruit over the course of a month, researchers said. But they didn't exercise or up their consumption of vegetables, according to the work presented Wednesday at the American Assn. for Cancer Research meeting in Anaheim. The work was looking at the notion that a greater effect could be achieved if people understood that one risky behavior - a poor diet, for instance - is associated with the chance of developing multiple diseases, said Melanie Jefferson of the Medical University of South Carolina, the lead researcher.
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SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Black men and women are twice as likely to die from coronary heart disease as white men and women, according to a study led by University of Alabama doctors. Death rates from heart attacks and coronary heart disease have fallen since the 1970s, but that statement rings far truer for whites than for blacks. Studies have shown a widening gap between whites and blacks in heart disease deaths and in heart-attack hospitalizations, and new research pins down just how deadly that difference is. A paper published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
People tend to think of heart disease as a scourge of modern life, brought on by vices such as greasy fast food, smoking and the tendency to be a couch potato. But 21st century CT scans of 137 antique mummies gathered from three continents show that hardened arteries have probably plagued mankind for thousands of years - even in places like the Aleutian Islands, where hunter-gatherers subsisted on a heart-healthy marine diet and occasional snacks of berries. Fully a third of the mummies examined - who lived in the American Southwest and Alaska as well as Egypt and Peru as much as 5,000 years ago - appeared to have the same vascular blockages that cause heart attacks and strokes in Americans today.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | STEVE EMMONS
The prognosis for Alzheimer's patients nowadays is still not good. Cognex, the one drug approved to treat the condition, only relieves symptoms. But, according to Carl W. Cotman, a prominent psychobiologist who directs UC Irvine's research into Alzheimer's, efforts toward understanding the disease "are going like gangbusters. It's an amazing rate of progress." Drugs that may slow the disease are being tested.
HEALTH
April 5, 2010 | By Kendall Powell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The differences in men and women's hearts may not be limited to problems of the small and large arteries. Sudden cardiac arrest and how it's predicted may play out differently by gender as well. In the U.S., sudden cardiac arrest claims around 250,000 lives each year, which is about 30% of the total deaths from cardiovascular disease. In sudden cardiac arrest, the heart's electrical activity becomes disrupted or chaotic, preventing the organ from beating. Without immediate treatment by an external defibrillator or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the victim will die; the mortality rate is 95%. In a heart attack, blood flow to the heart muscle is restricted, causing damage to the muscle.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JEFF DONN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Paul W. Ewald's best thinking started with an attack of diarrhea on a field trip to Kansas. A zoologist, he was studying the social habits of sparrows. But during that ordeal 24 years ago, he had time to ponder other things: Was his personal predicament simply the havoc of a germ bent on spreading itself around? Or was his body trying to flush away the germ? Was this the evolutionary adaptation of an invader or the evolved human defense against it?
SCIENCE
February 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In a finding certain to put new pressure on the purveyors of sugary foods and drinks, a worldwide analysis shows that regardless of its effect on obesity, the ebb and flow of sugar in a country's diet strongly influences the diabetes rate there. The new study provides compelling evidence that obesity isn't driving the worldwide pandemic of Type 2 diabetes as much as the rising consumption of sugar - largely in the form of sweetened sodas, experts said. Increases in sugar intake account for a third of new cases of diabetes in the United States and a quarter of cases worldwide, according to calculations published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. In the 175 countries studied, a 150-calorie daily increase in the availability of sugar - about the equivalent of a can of Coke or Pepsi - raises the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes by 1.1%, a research team from Stanford University and UC San Francisco found.
FOOD
November 3, 1988 | TONI TIPTON
Here is a glossary of terms frequently used in discussions of cardiovascular disease and risk factors for that illness. Also included are definitions for a variety of the fiber foods often mentioned in relation to this disease and its prevention. Atherosclerosis: A disease that begins early in life with the formation of cholesterol-containing plaque or fatty streaks on the inner walls of the arteries, eventually narrowing them and inhibiting blood flow.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A healthier lifestyle may go a long way in reducing the risk of erectile dysfunction, a study finds, while another paper discovers that men who have the condition may also have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. A meta-analysis published online Monday in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine looked at how lifestyle changes and medication to treat cardiovascular risks affected erectile dysfunction. In six studies that included 640 participants, four dealt with lifestyle changes, and two with the use of statins.
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