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NEWS
January 8, 1988 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
As an 8-year-old boy in Pontiac, Mich., Michael Clark wanted to become a nun. This week, Clark, who changed his name to Joanna after a sex change operation in 1975, took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience in a service officiated by an Episcopal priest in a San Clemente church. Taking the name "Sister Mary Elizabeth," Clark inaugurated her own order, the Community of St. Elizabeth. But on Thursday, Acting Episcopal Bishop Oliver B. Garver Jr. repudiated the event.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia - American Emily Cook finished her Olympic career and moved on to her continuing task - taking care of the next generation. Cook spent a long time comforting an emotional Ashley Caldwell, the 20-year-old American who put down the highest score of the day in qualifying in women's aerials. But the high was soon replaced by a gut-wrenching low when she faltered in the first round of finals and failed to advance. The 34-year-old Cook, who served as Caldwell's mentor, left the world stage having competed in three Olympics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | MIMI KO
The Brea-La Habra Branch of the American Assn. of University Women has been honored for its efforts to encourage young female students to strive for careers in science and math. The association awarded the local branch first place in the state and third place in the nation for its work in raising awareness to the shortage of women in science and math fields. "We put on an awareness program to encourage girls to get into math and science and won," branch President Wilma Sauer said.
IMAGE
December 13, 2009
About a month ago, a friend and I were strolling through the Beverly Center, when to my surprise she asked to stop at Ann Taylor. A present for her grandmother, I assumed, but that wasn't the case. My friend, in a Balenciaga lace bandeau top and Nina Ricci ankle boots, made a beeline for a table of shiny accessories and started trying them on. Still confused as to why we were in my mom's favorite store, I spotted another young shopper, wearing beaded moccasin boots and the cover look from the Urban Outfitters catalog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990 | DAVID F. BURKE
Female junior and senior high school students have been invited to attend a conference today at Cal State Fullerton. Participants will be given an opportunity to meet successful professional women working in fields that require scientific and mathematical training, according to Liz Hickman of the American Assn. of University Women, which is sponsoring the event. Sixteen workshops will be offered in areas ranging from archeology to medicine.
NEWS
January 15, 1988
Episcopal Bishop-elect Frederick Borsch said he would consider the application of Joanna Clark, who underwent a sex change operation 13 years ago, if she formally applies to establish her own religious community in Orange County. Her status as a transsexual would not disqualify her from forming a new order or from becoming an Episcopal nun, he said. But he would take the operation into account, along with other traits, in his decision, he said.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
Car sales are expected to downshift to 9.9 million units this year, compared to 10.5 million last year, because consumer spending is exhausted after several strong years for the auto industry, analysts say. In the first six months of the year, car sales fell 7.6% compared to the 1988 period. Truck sales dipped 5.3%. Sales were last this slow during the slump of 1982-83, said Christopher Cedergren, an analyst with J. D. Power & Associates, an automotive market research firm in Agoura Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY
When she speaks to girls about pursuing science careers, author and engineering consultant Judith Cohen often finds that age makes a difference. Elementary school students "see no boundaries," she said, while older girls tend to be more image conscious. "When you start talking to girls in high school and junior high school, they're concerned about how people will view them," Cohen said. "If it's not considered ladylike to be a scientist, they're a little concerned about it."
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Rebecca Binder launched her architectural practice 10 years ago with a rare boldness. Rather than wait for a client to come along with a first commission, as most hopeful young architects do, Binder became her own developer. With her husband, Gary Fisher, she purchased a site in Santa Monica and built a row of condominiums that immediately caught the attention of the design community and won a national award from the American Institute of Architects in 1985.
NEWS
April 20, 1992 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If George Bush's reelection team were a rock group, it probably would be called Mary and the White Boys. Just look at the photographs. Although official Washington remains a town blanketed by white men in dark suits, that was rarely so striking as last December, when Bush announced the people in charge of his political future. There they stood, seven men, middle-aged, hands folded in front of them, sternly listening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Liz Claiborne, the designer who built a global fashion empire by taking career women out of "uptight" suits and offering them a wide range of affordable, feminine and colorful separates that were stylish without being trendy, has died. She was 78. Often called the working woman's best friend, Claiborne died Tuesday at New York Presbyterian Hospital after battling cancer for several years, a family spokesman said.
OPINION
June 3, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
IT WAS THE FACTOID heard 'round the world. Twenty years ago, Newsweek ran a cover story saying that a 40-year-old single woman was more likely to be killed by a terrorist than to find a husband. Citing the findings of a Harvard-Yale study, the article effectively told a lot of women that they should start adopting cats now. The figures (like most headline-making numbers, applied to white, college-educated types) were these: A 30-year-old single woman stood a 20% chance of ever getting married.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2005 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
As a waitress for an Inglewood soul food restaurant, Normene Woods found it difficult to save money being a single mother with two teenage sons at home. With a monthly income of about $1,400 including tips, Woods qualified for rental assistance on her three-bedroom apartment. Her goal to buy a residence seemed out of reach.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | ANN MARSH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent evening at Lilly's French Cafe on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, Andrea Stanford, 35, joins four other mothers at an outside table for a book club dinner. The evening's selection, "Midwives," is aptly titled, for the women are in the process of birthing new lives not only for their young children, but also for themselves. You might say that Stanford and her book club friends are thoroughbreds of the U.S. economy.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only a decade ago, Japanese women who failed to marry by age 25 were warned not to become "Christmas cakes" left unsold on the shelf past their expiration date. But millions of them are now flouting their elders' advice--and getting away with it. Japan today is a paradise for singles. Nearly half of Japanese women are still single at age 29. Growing numbers are postponing marriage until 35 or beyond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sandie Sorensen believes clothes can make or break a woman, at least professionally. So the coordinator of volunteers has recently become a stylist and fashion advisor for women re-entering the job market and without the means to afford business attire. She now runs Misty's Closet in Westminster, a program created by the Soroptimists, a women's nonprofit organization, providing low-income women with clothes for job interviews or who have new jobs.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In case life in the '90s doesn't already foster enough soul-searching, along comes a new dilemma: Should you bring your daughter to work? Many working parents across the country will signal their decisions today with the arrival of the first "Take Our Daughters to Work Day" sponsored by the Ms. Foundation for Women. At first blush, the notion of bringing children between the ages of 9 and 15 to the office or factory might come across as unassailable as parenthood.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometime this fall, a chauffeured limousine will pull up to South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa and out will step a grand-prize winner with $5,000 to start a four-hour shopping spree. No, the lucky shopper won't be a radio show contestant or a participant from a revival of the "Queen for a Day" television show. It will be a nurse from FHP Inc., a health maintenance organization in Fountain Valley that is rewarding nurses who recruit others for the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1998
A variety of women employed in the entertainment industry will talk about their career paths and how to get into the business during "Careers in the Entertainment Industry," a Thursday night forum at Women at Work, 50 N. Hill Ave., Suite 300, Pasadena. Admission is $20, and preregistration is required: (626) 796-6870.
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