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NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
HONOLULU -- Home-based caregivers of ill or elderly family members are under enormous physical and mental stress, but daily meditative yoga may be a simple, effective strategy for maintaining health, according to a study presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Assn . UCLA researchers Helen Lavretsky and Michael Irwin conducted an eight-week, randomized trial on the effects of meditation exercise on 49 people who...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the new movie "Hateship Loveship," Kristen Wiig's character, an introverted, thirtysomething housekeeper named Johannna practices kissing herself in the mirror. It's a moment of loneliness that Wiig and director Liza Johnson envisioned as a sad beat in the film. But at a screening last September at the Toronto International Film Festival, Wiig was shocked when audiences laughed at the scene. "I'm so surprised that comes across as funny," she said in a recent interview at a Los Feliz cafe.
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HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's, you're in plenty of company. Nearly 11 million people take care of the 5.3 million Americans with the disease, a number that's expected to grow to almost 16 million by 2050, according to the Alzheimer's Assn. The demands of care-taking often place enormous pressure on a family's time and resources. A 2009 AARP and National Alliance for Caregiving survey found that caregivers — most commonly middle-aged women caring for a parent — give more than 20 hours of their time per week.
SCIENCE
April 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy and Lisa Girion
Federal officials said Thursday they hoped a new "rescue pen" would help reduce the death toll from overdoses involving prescription painkillers. The Food and Drug Administration approved the sale, by prescription, of the prefilled auto-injector of the drug naloxone that caregivers or family members can use to reverse the effects of prescription painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, and heroin. Available until now only by syringe, naloxone has been a workhorse drug in emergency departments battling the relentless rise in painkiller overdoses over the last decade.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A yoga meditation program could reduce depression symptoms and boost mental health, a study finds, and that's not all - it may also show benefits at the cellular level. The study, published recently in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry , involved 49 caregivers ranging in age from 45 to 91 who were taking care of family members with dementia. Caregivers are at risk for high stress levels, often with no outlet or relief, which can lead to health problems. The participants were randomly assigned to two programs: Kundalini yoga Kirtan Kriya meditation or passive relaxation with instrumental music.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Getting an early diagnosis of dementia could lead to finding ways to cope - and it could mean feeling bereft at what the future holds. So do you want to know? The early diagnosis of and intervention for Alzheimer's and other dementia has become an increasing priority, but that means the patients and their informal caregivers are left facing many issues regarding their futures that need to be considered, researchers said Tuesday. The researchers, from several British universities, reviewed 102 studies from 14 countries to consider the ramifications on patients and caregivers of a dementia diagnosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
More than two decades ago, Congress set out to stop dangerous or incompetent caregivers from crossing state lines and landing in trouble again. It ordered up a national database allowing hospitals to check for disciplinary actions taken anywhere in the country against nurses, pharmacists, psychologists and other licensed health professionals. On March 1 -- 22 years later -- the federal government finally plans to let hospitals use it. But the long-awaited repository is missing serious disciplinary actions against what are probably thousands of health providers, according to an investigation by the nonprofit news organization ProPublica in collaboration with the Los Angeles Times.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the next two decades about 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. will turn 65. As they age, a portion of them will be cared for by their families, and others will no doubt enter facilities for the elderly. But many will rely on a growing cadre of domestic in-home workers. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the demand for the kind of personal-care aides who can help cook, clean and bathe the elderly and disabled is expected to grow by 70% from 2010 to 2020. Today, these caregivers often labor in conditions that would not be tolerated in any other industry.
HEALTH
August 20, 2001
The article "Cancer's Toll on Marriage" (July 16) by Judy Foreman clearly outlined what stress in a medical crisis does to a marriage. Caregivers may survive emotional strain but their physical health suffers. They have been found to have lower activity levels of immune cells that kill infectious intruders and destroy tumor cells before they become full-blown cancer as reported in Annals of Behavioral Medicine. Studies have found that people caring for ailing relatives also tend to gain more weight and have higher cholesterol and blood pressure than non-caregivers.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2010 | By Clement Tan
The House voted 419 to 0 on Wednesday to approve new benefits and financial support for the primary live-in caregivers of seriously wounded veterans who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The measure, which would cost about $1.7 billion over five years, is part of comprehensive legislation that would permit the Department of Veterans Affairs to expand its assistance to family members of veterans generally. Among other things, the bill also calls for seven days of post-delivery care for female veterans' newborns and more accessible healthcare for veterans living in rural areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Carol Starr Schneider
Even in the emergency room at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center at 5 a.m., while waiting to be seen after a fall, my 92-year-old dad knew a straight line when he heard one. "Are you comfortable?" a nurse asked, propping him up with a pillow. "I make a living," he said without missing a beat. My father, Ben Starr, was the son of immigrants who fled Russia with their senses of humor intact, and he put that cultural inheritance to good use throughout his life. Growing up in Brooklyn, he was known as "Peanut" because of his size.
SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Many people agree that focusing on a smartphone or tablet is a bad idea when you're supposed to be driving a car, but what about when you're parenting a child? As mobile devices become increasingly absorbing and pervasive, social commentators and researchers worry what effects they're having on interactions between children and distracted caregivers. In a paper published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, Boston researchers described what they called the first-ever investigation into the topic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - A union effort to increase salaries for workers caring for the country's elderly and disabled threatens to backfire in California, where Gov. Jerry Brown wants to limit their hours. A change in federal rules set for next year entitles nearly 2 million home aides nationwide to overtime pay. But Brown, in an effort to keep a lid on costs, has proposed a cap on the time they work in the state's taxpayer-funded home care program for low-income Californians. The proposal, part of the governor's latest budget plan, could particularly affect disabled people who receive more than 40 hours of assistance a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2014 | By Christopher Goffard, Ari Bloomekatz and Mark Boster
A 71-year-old woman who cared for five mentally impaired adults in a Santa Ana group home scrambled to help them Wednesday morning after a smoke alarm warned her the house was on fire, fire officials said. The caregiver of the four-bedroom group home at 2138 N. Hathaway St. suffered burns to the head and body in the effort, and three of the residents escaped or were pulled out by firefighters. Two others -- identified as women aged 52 and 48 - were found dead in separate bedrooms.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
Brenda Schmitz and her youngest son, Max, then 2 years old, shared a favorite song: "Over the Rainbow. " At the time, Schmitz and her family hadn't seen rain - let alone a rainbow - for five weeks when the wife and mother of four was hospitalized at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines for ovarian cancer. But on the day of her death, in September 2011, a large, bright double rainbow cast across the sky. Her husband, David, said this was the first but certainly not the last time Schmitz would give her family signs that she was watching over them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
As American parents have grappled with financial peril and other woes over the last decade, grandparents have stepped in to help. Grandparents were the main caregivers for more than 3 million children in 2011 - a 20% increase from the turn of the millennium, the Pew Research Center reported Wednesday. The numbers surged during the economic downturn and have leveled off in its aftermath, Pew said in a report based on an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Sixty percent of those children still have at least one parent at home, but grandparents are responsible for most of their needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - The cost of providing care to elderly and disabled Californians is set to increase in about 15 months because of new federal rules on overtime. The new regulations, announced Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Labor, will require overtime pay for almost 2 million more workers nationwide, including nearly 360,000 caregivers in California's taxpayer-funded home care program. Gov. Jerry Brown's administration estimates that the overtime will cost the state an extra $150 million annually for its In-Home Supportive Services program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
As American parents have grappled with financial peril and other woes over the last decade, grandparents have stepped in to help. Grandparents were the main caregivers for more than 3 million children in 2011 - a 20% increase from the turn of the millennium, the Pew Research Center reported Wednesday. The numbers surged during the economic downturn and have leveled off in its aftermath, Pew said in a report based on an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Sixty percent of those children still have at least one parent at home, but grandparents are responsible for most of their needs.
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