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Caregiving

NEWS
May 29, 1995 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even families that have planned for the needs of an older relative and set aside some money may be surprised to learn just how little their savings can actually buy. The average cost of staying in a private nursing home is $30,000 to $40,000 a year, according to the National Council of Senior Citizens, while caring for someone at home--an Alzheimer's patient, for example--takes about $12,000 a year.
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NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
HONOLULU -- Home-based caregivers of ill or elderly family members are under enormous physical and mental stress, but daily meditative yoga may be a simple, effective strategy for maintaining health, according to a study presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Assn . UCLA researchers Helen Lavretsky and Michael Irwin conducted an eight-week, randomized trial on the effects of meditation exercise on 49 people who...
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS
The rigors of care-giving can be stressful. The job is a tough one that involves many tasks, responsibilities and long hours. If you are caring for an aging parent, experts suggest keeping several things in mind: * Don't try to do it alone. The responsibility for an aging parent is best met as a shared responsibility with other family members. If no other family members are available, ask for help from friends, consider hiring a paid helper or look into community resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
As the senior citizen population has grown in South County, the need for qualified caregivers has increased significantly. To help meet this need, the Saddleback College Health Science and Human Services Department's Caregiving Training Program will continue to offer help for family members, agencies and independent providers. The program is made possible by grants received from the Irvine Health Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retiree Jerry Cohen's savings are slipping away as he cares for his ailing wife, Harriet, at home. If he put her into a nursing home instead, Medicaid would pick up most of the cost. "It just doesn't make any sense. Any rational person can realize a home environment with a caregiver is best," says Cohen, who echoes the experience of many when he adds, "I love her now more than when I first met her." The struggles and rewards of caregiving are given equal treatment in "And Thou Shalt Honor ..."
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The job entails endless hours, no pay and a varied workload--everything from cutting up food to securing a wheelchair, emptying a bedpan and dressing grown-ups. Family caregivers--13 million strong, by some estimates--have no formal training to help their elderly, physically or mentally ill family members get through the day, and in the process often drive themselves to the brink of exhaustion. But there is hope: former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, who has made care-giving her mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997 | NICK GREEN
Actress and comedian Betty White of "Golden Girls" fame will be the guest of honor at a benefit dinner April 26 for the nonprofit Caregivers group at Oxnard's Tower Club. Caregivers is an organization of volunteers who provide friendship and assistance to elderly residents of Ventura, Santa Paula and Fillmore. White has made a video about elder abuse on behalf of the California attorney general's office. Tickets to the fund-raiser are $100. Call 652-0566 for reservations by April 11.
HEALTH
August 20, 2001
The article "Cancer's Toll on Marriage" (July 16) by Judy Foreman clearly outlined what stress in a medical crisis does to a marriage. Caregivers may survive emotional strain but their physical health suffers. They have been found to have lower activity levels of immune cells that kill infectious intruders and destroy tumor cells before they become full-blown cancer as reported in Annals of Behavioral Medicine. Studies have found that people caring for ailing relatives also tend to gain more weight and have higher cholesterol and blood pressure than non-caregivers.
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