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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
The City Council has adopted a resolution urging a prison term for a caregiver convicted of defrauding 94-year-old resident John Alton of his life savings, then abandoning him. In June, Leonora Deptowicz was convicted by Santa Monica Superior Court Judge Leslie Light of fiduciary abuse and grand theft, which left Alton virtually penniless when he died last year. Light said he would seek restitution from Deptowicz, possible jail time, and community service when he is sentenced Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2001
Leona Ruth Morris, a retired residential caregiver, has died at the age of 75. Morris, who died Sunday at Camarillo Convalescent Hospital, was born March 21, 1925, in Cortland, Neb., with a twin sister. For the last 50 years, Morris lived in Ojai. She worked as a residential caregiver before her retirement. In addition to her sister, Lille Robinson of Nixon, Texas, she is survived by daughters Carol Stene of Yucca, Ariz.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Officials at two large labor unions announced Monday that they would end a long-running battle over who should represent thousands of low-wage workers caring for the elderly and young children in California. As part of a two-year national pact, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Service Employees International Union agreed not to interfere with the other union's bargaining agreements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1998 | JOHN POPE and MIMI KO CRUZ
A series of workshops sponsored by the Orange Caregiver Resource Center is being held for people taking care of brain-impaired adults. The workshops will help family caregivers learn what they need to know about the law and caring for a brain-impaired relative. Workshops will be held in various areas throughout the county. A $10 fee is required. To register or obtain a schedule of dates and locations: (714) 680-0122.
HEALTH
August 30, 1999
Jane E. Allen is to be commended for her article "The Burdens of Love" (Aug. 2). She has focused on a critically important issue, the long-term care of growing numbers of older, culturally diverse Americans. She makes an important point: Family members, who take on most of the long-term care needs of their older relatives with chronic illnesses or disabilities, also take on a heavy burden, often with high levels of stress and depression. It is for those family caregivers and for those older people who will require care that the Clinton administration has proposed the first step in a long-term care strategy for our nation.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Robert Young, the handsome leading man of films of the 1930s and 1940s who parlayed his considerable charm into television stardom in "Father Knows Best" and "Marcus Welby, M.D.," has died. He was 91. The ideal father for a generation, Young, who said he merely played the dad he yearned to have himself, died Tuesday night at his Westlake Village home. He had earlier undergone heart surgery and died of causes related to old age, according to his physician, Dr. John Horton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein
More than two decades ago, Congress set out to stop dangerous or incompetent caregivers from crossing state lines and landing in trouble again. It ordered up a national database allowing hospitals to check for disciplinary actions taken anywhere in the country against nurses, pharmacists, psychologists and other licensed health professionals. On March 1 -- 22 years later -- the federal government finally plans to let hospitals use it. But the long-awaited repository is missing serious disciplinary actions against what are probably thousands of health providers, according to an investigation by the nonprofit news organization ProPublica in collaboration with the Los Angeles Times.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the next two decades about 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. will turn 65. As they age, a portion of them will be cared for by their families, and others will no doubt enter facilities for the elderly. But many will rely on a growing cadre of domestic in-home workers. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the demand for the kind of personal-care aides who can help cook, clean and bathe the elderly and disabled is expected to grow by 70% from 2010 to 2020. Today, these caregivers often labor in conditions that would not be tolerated in any other industry.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000
AccentCare, Irvine-based provider of in-home care-giving services for seniors, said Monday it acquired ContinueCare, an in-home care-giving agency in San Jose. Financial terms were not disclosed. The newly acquired agency will be combined with Victorian Care Providers San Jose office, which AccentCare acquired in July.
HEALTH
November 8, 1999 | BOB ROSENBLATT
Taking care of somebody with a chronic health problem is like running a marathon, a long and grueling experience. "If you give it all your energy upfront, you exhaust yourself," warned Debra Cherry, a clinical psychologist and the assistant director of the Los Angeles Alzheimer's Assn. "You just have to pace yourself."
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