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January 4, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
As far as the Friends of Fine Arts of the University of Southern California are concerned, George Charles Page, the philanthropist, is their man for 1985. Tonight at Frances Klein Jewels on Rodeo Drive, Frances Klein and the Friends host a cocktail party at which they'll talk about Page and announce that he will be the guest of honor at the Jewel Gala II on Feb. 2 at the Beverly Hilton's Grand Ballroom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008
Paul Thomas Anderson's epic about a ruthless oilman who literally claws his way out of one hellhole straight into a better-decorated, more luxurious hell of his own devising is as baffling as it is awe-inspiringly powerful. "There Will Be Blood" has been called a contemporary silent movie, not because the film contains no dialogue but because what dialogue it does contain sheds little light into the dark soul that animates Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis). That's what's remarkable about Anderson's picture -- it triggers instinct without necessarily appealing to reason.
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NEWS
June 30, 2005
Question: I've heard the American version of "March of the Penguins" differs from the original French. How is it different? Chocano: In the original version, which screened at Sundance in 2005, three actors provided individual, first-person penguin narration. A man, a woman and a child were cast -- not to impersonate the penguins but to channel them. I never saw that version, but it's been described to me as "poetic," which is rarely a good sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008 | Carina Chocano
After a season of feel-bad movies about the Iraq war, Mike Nichols' riotous "Charlie Wilson's War," written by Aaron Sorkin, feels fresh, trenchant, relevant and unexpectedly entertaining. Set in the 1980s, it's the story of an obscure congressman's (Tom Hanks) unlikely crusade to arm the Afghans against the Soviets and thus help bring about the end of the Soviet Union. Aided by the sixth-richest woman in Texas (Julia Roberts) and a marginalized CIA agent (Philip Seymour Hoffman), the reprobate Wilson pulls off and wins the largest covert war of its type in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008
Paul Thomas Anderson's epic about a ruthless oilman who literally claws his way out of one hellhole straight into a better-decorated, more luxurious hell of his own devising is as baffling as it is awe-inspiringly powerful. "There Will Be Blood" has been called a contemporary silent movie, not because the film contains no dialogue but because what dialogue it does contain sheds little light into the dark soul that animates Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis). That's what's remarkable about Anderson's picture -- it triggers instinct without necessarily appealing to reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008
Adapted from Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel by Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud, "Persepolis" tells the story of a girl growing up in Tehran in the 1970s and '80s. The daughter of a cosmopolitan, liberal family, Marjane sees family members imprisoned for being communists by the shah, then sees them executed by Islamic revolutionaries. She's a witness to history from overthrow to war. Outspoken and free-spirited, Marjane is a danger to herself in a society as repressive as the ayatollah's Iran, and her family sends her to boarding school in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | Carina Chocano
There are lots of reasons to check out Amir Bar-Lev's documentary "My Kid Could Paint That," so I'll just stick to one. It's the story of a little girl called Marla Olmstead, who, due to an unusual but predictable confluence of events, became an international art star. Backlash followed media frenzy (doesn't it always?), and a few months later Marla's father was accused of "coaching" her and Marla was branded a fraud. She was 4 at the time.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
Question: Why do filmmakers insist on montages? Is it movie shorthand, or laziness? Chocano: To understand the montage of today, you need to go back to its origins. In French, "montage" means editing, but in movie terminology, "montage" refers to a series of short shots edited into a sequence. Since Soviet filmmaker Lev Kuleshov, in his Kuleshov Experiment circa 1920, cut together the same reaction shot of a man's face with images of food, a woman, etc.
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