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Carl Bernstein

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April 9, 1989 | Eric Foner, Foner teaches American history at Columbia University. His most recent book, "Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution" (Harper & Row), won the 1988 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for history. Foner's father, Jack Foner, is a professor of U.S. history who was blacklisted during the 1940s and 1950s. and
Forty years after the Red Scare, American communism remains a subject of fascination and controversy. The latest book that seeks to illuminate the communist experience is "Loyalties" by Carl Bernstein, the Washington Post reporter who exposed the Watergate scandal, although lately, his amorous exploits have attracted more attention than his journalistic ones. Touted as a comeback, "Loyalties" is not likely to restore Bernstein's literary reputation. Part memoir, part investigation of the human toll exacted by McCarthyism, "Loyalties" fails both as autobiography and as political analysis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
We learn in the opening moments of "Herblock: The Black & the White" that when famed Washington Post editorial cartoonist Herbert Block (best known by the signature in the film's title) was young, he drew a chalk caricature of Kaiser Wilhelm on the sidewalk, taking pleasure in the notion that his neighbors would be walking over it. Block never lost the glee that came from creating images that would stir the pot and champion causes close to his heart. Michael Stevens' (son of filmmaker George Stevens Jr.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For Carl Bernstein, the drill was all too familiar: He was hot on the trail of White House intrigue that led him deep into a thicket of scandals, and there were powerful forces trying to discredit his work, even before it was published. But this time the target was Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-New York), not Richard M. Nixon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"All the President's Men Revisited," which premieres Sunday on Discovery Channel, returns us to those thrilling days of yesteryear when everyone read newspapers and the legislative and judicial branches of the U.S. government were capable of acting out of something other than political self-interest and scorched-earth partisan intransigence. No, young people, I am not making that up. Narrated by executive producer Robert Redford, who produced and starred in "All the President's Men," the 1976 film of the 1974 book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, it is not merely the story of the historical events but of the transformation of those events into a work - a pretty great work - of popular art. News footage alternates with scenes from the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
We learn in the opening moments of "Herblock: The Black & the White" that when famed Washington Post editorial cartoonist Herbert Block (best known by the signature in the film's title) was young, he drew a chalk caricature of Kaiser Wilhelm on the sidewalk, taking pleasure in the notion that his neighbors would be walking over it. Block never lost the glee that came from creating images that would stir the pot and champion causes close to his heart. Michael Stevens' (son of filmmaker George Stevens Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Robert Redford never planned to play Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men," the Oscar-winning 1976 adaptation of Woodward and Carl Bernstein's account of their investigation of the 1972 Watergate break-in and the cloak-and-dagger cover-up by the Richard Nixon White House. Redford didn't even want the movie to be in color. "I originally wanted to make a black-and-white, small film with two unknowns," said Redford, who also served as producer on the film, which was directed by Alan J. Pakula and costarred Dustin Hoffman, Jason Robards, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam and Hal Holbrook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2012 | By John Horn and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
This article has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details. Nora Ephron, who cast an acerbic eye on relationships, metropolitan living and aging in essays, books, plays and hit movies including "Sleepless in Seattle," "When Harry Met Sally... " and "Julie & Julia," died Tuesday in New York. She was 71. Ephron died at New York Presbyterian Hospital, where she was being treated for acute myeloid leukemia and pneumonia, said her close friend and Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Howls of denial and disbelief are greeting "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President," a new book that purports to reveal secrets of the Watergate scandal. Chief among the critics is former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein, who with Bob Woodward played a major role in breaking the Watergate story. He said that the claim made in the book, written by Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin, that Alexander M. Haig Jr., once President Richard M.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1992
Your otherwise fine interview with Jack Nicholson last Sunday contained an interviewer's error that surprisingly not even Nicholson caught: to wit, that until "Hoffa," Nicholson had never played a real-life person. Untrue. Nicholson portrayed playwright Eugene O'Neill in "Reds" in 1981. And one might even mount a case for his thinly disguised portrait of journalist Carl Bernstein in "Heartburn." I won't, but one might. JIM BEAVER Van Nuys
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000
* PayMyBills.com Inc. has agreed to acquire person-to-person payment site PayMe.com. The California companies, both backed by Idealab, a Pasadena Internet incubator, gave few details of the deal, saying only that it was an all-stock transaction and that they expect it to close in May. * * Conexant Systems Inc. said it has acquired Applied Telecom Inc. of Lisle, Ill., which supplies telecommunications software and hardware to equipment companies. Terms were not disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Robert Redford never planned to play Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men," the Oscar-winning 1976 adaptation of Woodward and Carl Bernstein's account of their investigation of the 1972 Watergate break-in and the cloak-and-dagger cover-up by the Richard Nixon White House. Redford didn't even want the movie to be in color. "I originally wanted to make a black-and-white, small film with two unknowns," said Redford, who also served as producer on the film, which was directed by Alan J. Pakula and costarred Dustin Hoffman, Jason Robards, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam and Hal Holbrook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2012 | By John Horn and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Nora Ephron, who cast an acerbic eye on relationships, metropolitan living and aging in essays, books, plays and hit movies including "Sleepless in Seattle," "When Harry Met Sally... " and "Julie & Julia," died Tuesday in New York. She was 71. Ephron died at New York Presbyterian Hospital, where she was being treated for acute myeloid leukemia and pneumonia, said her close friend and Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen. A rare author and screenwriter whose works appealed to highbrow readers and mainstream moviegoers, Ephron wrote fiction that was distinguished by characters who seemed simultaneously normal and extraordinary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2007 | Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writer
In the official narrative of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, Carl Bernstein has long been one of the arch-villains, a reporter whose name -- along with that of former Washington Post colleague Bob Woodward -- elicited special loathing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For Carl Bernstein, the drill was all too familiar: He was hot on the trail of White House intrigue that led him deep into a thicket of scandals, and there were powerful forces trying to discredit his work, even before it was published. But this time the target was Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-New York), not Richard M. Nixon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2007 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
EVERY biography of a presidential candidate implicitly poses the same question: Is the past prologue? Biographers comb through the contenders' lives trying to find signs of the president they might become in the decisions they've made and the experiences they've accumulated. They seek hints of the future by examining shards of the past. Any biographer undertaking that effort with Hillary Rodham Clinton, the Democratic U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sylvia Bernstein, 88, a native Washingtonian who championed civil rights and civil liberties and fought to desegregate the city in the 1950s, died of pancreatic cancer Sunday at her home in Washington, D.C. The daughter of Russian immigrants, Bernstein fought to desegregate area restaurants, an amusement park and public swimming pools and playgrounds. She advocated home rule for the District of Columbia and protested the Vietnam War and the development of nuclear weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sylvia Bernstein, 88, a native Washingtonian who championed civil rights and civil liberties and fought to desegregate the city in the 1950s, died of pancreatic cancer Sunday at her home in Washington, D.C. The daughter of Russian immigrants, Bernstein fought to desegregate area restaurants, an amusement park and public swimming pools and playgrounds. She advocated home rule for the District of Columbia and protested the Vietnam War and the development of nuclear weapons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"All the President's Men Revisited," which premieres Sunday on Discovery Channel, returns us to those thrilling days of yesteryear when everyone read newspapers and the legislative and judicial branches of the U.S. government were capable of acting out of something other than political self-interest and scorched-earth partisan intransigence. No, young people, I am not making that up. Narrated by executive producer Robert Redford, who produced and starred in "All the President's Men," the 1976 film of the 1974 book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, it is not merely the story of the historical events but of the transformation of those events into a work - a pretty great work - of popular art. News footage alternates with scenes from the movie.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000
* PayMyBills.com Inc. has agreed to acquire person-to-person payment site PayMe.com. The California companies, both backed by Idealab, a Pasadena Internet incubator, gave few details of the deal, saying only that it was an all-stock transaction and that they expect it to close in May. * * Conexant Systems Inc. said it has acquired Applied Telecom Inc. of Lisle, Ill., which supplies telecommunications software and hardware to equipment companies. Terms were not disclosed.
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