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Carl Hodges

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988
The Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater will celebrate "National Spaceweek," beginning Thursday with a week of free lectures and activities. The speakers include Dr. Paolo Soleri, the founder of Arcosanti, the well-publicized futuristic city north of Phoenix; Derek Elliott, assistant curator of for the Department of Space Science and Exploration, and Carl Hodges, director of Environmental Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona. Call 238-1233 for more information.
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BUSINESS
July 10, 2008 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Tastiota, Mexico A few miles inland from the Sea of Cortez, amid cracked earth and mesquite and sun-bleached cactus, neat rows of emerald plants are sprouting from the desert floor. The crop is salicornia. It is nourished by seawater flowing from a man-made canal. And if you believe the American who is farming it, this incongruous swath of green has the potential to feed the world, fuel our vehicles and slow global warming.
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BUSINESS
July 10, 2008 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Tastiota, Mexico A few miles inland from the Sea of Cortez, amid cracked earth and mesquite and sun-bleached cactus, neat rows of emerald plants are sprouting from the desert floor. The crop is salicornia. It is nourished by seawater flowing from a man-made canal. And if you believe the American who is farming it, this incongruous swath of green has the potential to feed the world, fuel our vehicles and slow global warming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988
The Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater will celebrate "National Spaceweek," beginning Thursday with a week of free lectures and activities. The speakers include Dr. Paolo Soleri, the founder of Arcosanti, the well-publicized futuristic city north of Phoenix; Derek Elliott, assistant curator of for the Department of Space Science and Exploration, and Carl Hodges, director of Environmental Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona. Call 238-1233 for more information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
In the beginning, the Earth was a fashion misfit and the Garden of Eden's serpent was one bad dude. Cain wasted Abel and Noah was one cool brother. So goes P. K. McCary's new slang version of the Bible, one in which the Houston author aims to inspire hope in young blacks dispirited by poverty and violence. The Scripture according to the Black Bible Chronicles is lean, sinewy and street-savvy. In slang, it's bad.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | HRVOJE HRANJSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Americans in shorts and baseball caps dip their hands in chlorine before plunging them into the waist-high circular concrete tanks filled with seawater on the deserted stretch of Red Sea beach. The shrimp inside are their prime investment in a sea farming project that stands to make a lot of money as well for this tiny, impoverished nation in the Horn of Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1992 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The four men and four women were to be sealed inside the glass-and-steel structure, raising their own food, recycling their air, water and wastes, independent and untouched by the world outside. That, at least, is what they said. But in the four months that Biosphere 2 has operated, project sponsors have pumped in fresh air from outside. They have admitted to secretly installing a machine to scrub carbon dioxide from the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The unique meeting of the minds here has been called the world's greatest think tank. Or, as movie critic Roger Ebert puts it, in a switch on Thorstein Veblen, "the leisure of the theory class." Ebert has taken a week off in April every year for 19 years in order to attend the Conference on World Affairs at the University of Colorado, which just had its 40th annual conclave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
For five days in March, Abigail Alling lived in a room-sized greenhouse here completely sealed off from the external environment. The food she ate was grown in the module, the air she breathed was recycled by the plants and the water she drank and bathed in was purified by the soil. The experiment, designed to test for the buildup of toxic gases, is believed to be the longest time that anyone has spent in a closed ecosystem where everything essential for life is recycled and regenerated.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Under construction in the Santa Catalina mountains on the edge of the Sonora Desert here is a sprawling, 2.25-acre structure. In December, 1989, eight pioneers will step from the arid landscape into the greenhouse-like building and seal the door behind them--for two years. The structure, called Biosphere II, will be a sealed-off, self-contained microcosm of the world.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At sunrise on Thursday, four men and four women will don red jumpsuits, share a hug with their friends in Mission Control and leave the world behind. If all goes well, they will leave the Earth behind for two years. The eight are not climbing aboard a space shuttle, although their language and nomenclature are deliberately evocative of the heyday of NASA. But they are embarking on an adventure that is in some ways bolder than the first manned space flight.
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