Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCarl Paladino
IN THE NEWS

Carl Paladino

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
October 12, 2010 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
This was Carl Paladino's kind of parade. Marching bands. Italian and American flags. Not a bikini-clad, gyrating gay guy in sight. Not that he has anything against gays, Paladino, New York's Republican gubernatorial candidate, said Monday for the umpteenth time as he struggled to smooth over comments he had made a day earlier. "I unequivocally support gay rights. Unequivocally," said Paladino, clutching an American flag and marching up Fifth Avenue in New York's annual Columbus Day Parade.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey
A major national "tea party" group is getting involved in the surprisingly tight special congressional election in upstate New York. Sacramento-based Tea Party Express held two news conferences in New York's 26th congressional district on Monday, trying to highlight what they say is the fraudulent candidacy of Jack Davis. Davis is registered as the "Tea Party" candidate and his self-funded campaign has been eating into support for Republican nominee Jane Corwin. Some tea party activists argue that there is no such party, and that Davis, a onetime Democratic candidate, does not have the endorsement of major groups in the area.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Despite anger at incumbents across the country, New York Atty. Gen. Andrew M. Cuomo, who has spent most of his adult life in government, Tuesday was elected governor of New York, the job his father, Mario, held for three terms. In recent weeks, Democrat Cuomo, 52, ran far ahead of his Republican opponent, Carl Paladino, 64, a crusty Buffalo real estate developer who promised to take a baseball bat to the dysfunctional state government in Albany and came out of the primaries with strong support from the "tea party" movement.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Despite anger at incumbents across the country, New York Atty. Gen. Andrew M. Cuomo, who has spent most of his adult life in government, Tuesday was elected governor of New York, the job his father, Mario, held for three terms. In recent weeks, Democrat Cuomo, 52, ran far ahead of his Republican opponent, Carl Paladino, 64, a crusty Buffalo real estate developer who promised to take a baseball bat to the dysfunctional state government in Albany and came out of the primaries with strong support from the "tea party" movement.
NEWS
October 31, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
With polls showing him substantially ahead of his Republican opponent, New York gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo has decided not to release his full tax return despite having told reporters that he would. Cuomo, the state’s attorney general, who has fought political corruption and has called for more openness in government, released a summary of his taxes but decided not to release the full tax return before Tuesday’s election. The campaign said there was no need to release the return since Republican candidate Carl Paladino hadn’t.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Carl Paladino, a self-made multimillionaire who wants to be governor of New York, has set up shop in the lobby of a low-budget hotel in midtown Manhattan. This real estate developer from downtown Buffalo has been giving media interviews back to back since he trounced an establishment Republican last month to become the party's nominee. He is visibly exhausted, shirt rumpled, dark circles under his eyes. But when the subject turns to New York's state legislators, he is suddenly renewed, pounding his fist on the table with the ferocity of the jackhammer breaking up the sidewalk outside the hotel.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey
A major national "tea party" group is getting involved in the surprisingly tight special congressional election in upstate New York. Sacramento-based Tea Party Express held two news conferences in New York's 26th congressional district on Monday, trying to highlight what they say is the fraudulent candidacy of Jack Davis. Davis is registered as the "Tea Party" candidate and his self-funded campaign has been eating into support for Republican nominee Jane Corwin. Some tea party activists argue that there is no such party, and that Davis, a onetime Democratic candidate, does not have the endorsement of major groups in the area.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2010 | By Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
On the spectrum of political mistakes, being photographed in a Nazi uniform may top the list. That's the error that threatens to engulf the upstart campaign of Ohio Republican House candidate Rich Iott, whose past participation in a World War II reenactment group was reported Friday by the Atlantic , complete with photos of a grinning Iott dressed as a member of a German SS division. Iott is not the only insurgent candidate trying to clamber back onto safe ground: In New York, Republican gubernatorial nominee Carl Paladino insisted he is not anti-gay after telling an Orthodox Jewish congregation that children should not be "brainwashed into thinking that homosexuality is an equally valid and successful option.
OPINION
October 23, 2010
Apparently tired of merely ducking reporters, some high-profile candidates have started lashing out at them. But if recent verbal and physical assaults on journalists are disturbing, the behavior appears to be representative of an even more disturbing political strategy. When the editor of an online news site approached Alaska Republican senatorial candidate Joe Miller on Sunday to ask questions during a town hall meeting, he was handcuffed, detained and accused of trespassing by Miller's private security detail.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
In the evolving expectations game for Democrats, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell offered an intriguing metric by which to judge success for the party in gubernatorial races this fall. "We think we could end up in a place where, after the election, Democratic governors represent more electoral votes than we do today, and we could have more people with a Democratic governor," Markell, chair of the Democratic Governors Assn., said during a Q-and-A with reporters in Washington on Tuesday morning.
NEWS
October 31, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
With polls showing him substantially ahead of his Republican opponent, New York gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo has decided not to release his full tax return despite having told reporters that he would. Cuomo, the state’s attorney general, who has fought political corruption and has called for more openness in government, released a summary of his taxes but decided not to release the full tax return before Tuesday’s election. The campaign said there was no need to release the return since Republican candidate Carl Paladino hadn’t.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
This Rust Belt city understood the pain of recession long before the rest of the nation, when the factories started closing and few opportunities arrived in their place. The area helped send Barack Obama to the White House, hearing his message of hope and change. But fears of government overreach soon crowded that out.On the radio, a local car dealership tries to move Fords by advertising as "the guys that didn't take the bailout. " This political season, voters have faced the lingering economic morass, an endless loop of attack ads and, at the top of the state's ticket, a governor's race that features mad-as-hell "tea party" candidate Carl Paladino.
OPINION
October 23, 2010
Apparently tired of merely ducking reporters, some high-profile candidates have started lashing out at them. But if recent verbal and physical assaults on journalists are disturbing, the behavior appears to be representative of an even more disturbing political strategy. When the editor of an online news site approached Alaska Republican senatorial candidate Joe Miller on Sunday to ask questions during a town hall meeting, he was handcuffed, detained and accused of trespassing by Miller's private security detail.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2010 | By Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
On the spectrum of political mistakes, being photographed in a Nazi uniform may top the list. That's the error that threatens to engulf the upstart campaign of Ohio Republican House candidate Rich Iott, whose past participation in a World War II reenactment group was reported Friday by the Atlantic , complete with photos of a grinning Iott dressed as a member of a German SS division. Iott is not the only insurgent candidate trying to clamber back onto safe ground: In New York, Republican gubernatorial nominee Carl Paladino insisted he is not anti-gay after telling an Orthodox Jewish congregation that children should not be "brainwashed into thinking that homosexuality is an equally valid and successful option.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2010 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
This was Carl Paladino's kind of parade. Marching bands. Italian and American flags. Not a bikini-clad, gyrating gay guy in sight. Not that he has anything against gays, Paladino, New York's Republican gubernatorial candidate, said Monday for the umpteenth time as he struggled to smooth over comments he had made a day earlier. "I unequivocally support gay rights. Unequivocally," said Paladino, clutching an American flag and marching up Fifth Avenue in New York's annual Columbus Day Parade.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
In the evolving expectations game for Democrats, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell offered an intriguing metric by which to judge success for the party in gubernatorial races this fall. "We think we could end up in a place where, after the election, Democratic governors represent more electoral votes than we do today, and we could have more people with a Democratic governor," Markell, chair of the Democratic Governors Assn., said during a Q-and-A with reporters in Washington on Tuesday morning.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
This Rust Belt city understood the pain of recession long before the rest of the nation, when the factories started closing and few opportunities arrived in their place. The area helped send Barack Obama to the White House, hearing his message of hope and change. But fears of government overreach soon crowded that out.On the radio, a local car dealership tries to move Fords by advertising as "the guys that didn't take the bailout. " This political season, voters have faced the lingering economic morass, an endless loop of attack ads and, at the top of the state's ticket, a governor's race that features mad-as-hell "tea party" candidate Carl Paladino.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
New York Republicans have been a party on the verge of extinction for almost a decade. They have virtually nobody in Congress and no power in the state capital. The party is so weak that if it doesn't have a good showing in November it could be left with little representation. So given the choice in the GOP gubernatorial primary Tuesday between a "mad as hell" outsider and a party regular whose day job had been to lobby for Wall Street, New York Republicans turned out in larger than usual numbers to vote for Carl Paladino, the anti-establishment candidate.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Carl Paladino, a self-made multimillionaire who wants to be governor of New York, has set up shop in the lobby of a low-budget hotel in midtown Manhattan. This real estate developer from downtown Buffalo has been giving media interviews back to back since he trounced an establishment Republican last month to become the party's nominee. He is visibly exhausted, shirt rumpled, dark circles under his eyes. But when the subject turns to New York's state legislators, he is suddenly renewed, pounding his fist on the table with the ferocity of the jackhammer breaking up the sidewalk outside the hotel.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
The race to be the next governor of New York became a two-man heat Monday. In one of those the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend moments, Rick Lazio, a former congressman from Long Island, took himself out of the running in order to give "tea party" favorite Carl Paladino a better shot at beating their Democratic rival, state Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo. This month, Lazio lost badly to Paladino for the Republican nomination, yet kept his name on the ballot for the November election as the Conservative Party candidate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|