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Carl Shusterman

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OPINION
November 1, 1992
I was pleased to see your editorial "Bush vs. Clinton: What Would Be Best Immigration Policy?" (Oct. 26). Immigration policy has been almost totally ignored by the presidential candidates. The editorial properly places the issue of immigration against a broader background of trade agreements, foreign policy and the need for economic development in Third World countries. As an attorney who worked for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service prior to entering private practice, I believe that the steps advocated by The Times would go a long way toward solving some critical immigration problems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Like many other spouses of undocumented immigrants, Gina Pope constantly worries that her husband suddenly could be deported and that she would be left to raise their two children by herself. Pope, a U.S. citizen, wants to apply for him to get a green card but knows that would mean his traveling to his native Peru, with the risk of not returning for months or years. Now, after more than a decade of waiting for the immigration rules to change, Pope is cautiously optimistic that her husband, who owns a residential construction business and has a temporary work permit, may finally be able to become a legal resident.
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OPINION
October 31, 2006
Re "The cost of citizenship may go up," Oct. 29 Fees for processing citizenship papers will be oppressive for "lower-income, less-educated immigrants." Who wants "lower-income, less-educated immigrants" as citizens anyway? We do not need more welfare, uncompensated healthcare, English-as-a-secondlanguage programs, public housing or prisons. Our country has many unemployed citizens, low-income senior citizens, sick citizens without health insurance and other low/modest/middle-income people who have earned the care and attention of our government.
OPINION
October 31, 2006
Re "The cost of citizenship may go up," Oct. 29 Fees for processing citizenship papers will be oppressive for "lower-income, less-educated immigrants." Who wants "lower-income, less-educated immigrants" as citizens anyway? We do not need more welfare, uncompensated healthcare, English-as-a-secondlanguage programs, public housing or prisons. Our country has many unemployed citizens, low-income senior citizens, sick citizens without health insurance and other low/modest/middle-income people who have earned the care and attention of our government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997
When I read that 111,794 illegal aliens were deported in the past year, including more than 50,000 criminals (Oct. 31), the absurdity of the statement overwhelmed me. If 111,794 illegal aliens were deported in the last year, then the number of criminals deported was far above the 50,000 you reported; in fact, precisely 111,794 criminals were deported. Illegal aliens are, in fact, criminals. Illegal presence in the United States by a foreign national is a federal crime. When is The Times going to perceive the overwhelming, documented evidence and recognize illegal immigration for the enormous problem it actually is?
OPINION
January 15, 2004
Re "Physician, Remake Thyself," Jan. 10: There is little that the government of the Philippines can do to dissuade its physicians from becoming nurses in order to immigrate to the United States. As an immigration attorney who has helped many thousands of physicians and nurses immigrate to the U.S. over the last 20 years, I have observed that the severe nursing shortage in the U.S., as well as the economic disparities between the two countries, make this all but inevitable. Since U.S. hospitals benefit significantly from RNs trained in the Philippines, it's time for our country to invest in the training of Filipino nurses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Like many other spouses of undocumented immigrants, Gina Pope constantly worries that her husband suddenly could be deported and that she would be left to raise their two children by herself. Pope, a U.S. citizen, wants to apply for him to get a green card but knows that would mean his traveling to his native Peru, with the risk of not returning for months or years. Now, after more than a decade of waiting for the immigration rules to change, Pope is cautiously optimistic that her husband, who owns a residential construction business and has a temporary work permit, may finally be able to become a legal resident.
OPINION
February 10, 2005
Teresa Watanabe's excellent article "A Lifelong Lesson in Justice" (Feb. 5) tells the story of white teachers in World War II internment camps for Japanese Americans. I hope more Americans will learn about the terrible injustice that our country perpetuated on persons of Japanese ancestry -- immigrants and U.S. citizens alike -- during World War II. When I attended high school in the L.A. Unified School District in the 1960s, the internment camps were not even mentioned in our history textbooks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
An important item was missing from Mary Williams Walsh's article ("A Big Dose of Family Medicine," July 16) about family medicine in the U.S. and Canada. Because Canada has an excess of family practitioners while the U.S. is experiencing a severe shortage, a federal law was enacted in 1991 to make it easier for Canadian doctors to obtain temporary visas to practice medicine in the U.S. Although many of these Canadian physicians have obtained state licenses and signed contracts to work in medically underserved rural areas, a combination of bureaucratic inertia and red tape is acting to undermine the new law. Until such time as U.S. medical schools begin to produce enough family practitioners to serve the needs of our population, we should be welcoming with open arms any qualified Canadian family doctor who wishes to practice in the U.S. CARL SHUSTERMAN Board of Governors American Immigration Lawyers Assn.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1993
Although I agree with the thrust of Helene Pepe's "Making Nannies 'Legal' Can Be Done With Ease" (Commentary, Feb. 17), the article requires clarification from an immigration law standpoint. Although the headline states "Expand the 'unskilled labor' visa to include home care . . .," in fact housekeepers are already considered unskilled laborers. This is precisely the problem; they, and their families, are restricted to 10,000 visas reserved annually for unskilled labor.
OPINION
January 15, 2004
Re "Physician, Remake Thyself," Jan. 10: There is little that the government of the Philippines can do to dissuade its physicians from becoming nurses in order to immigrate to the United States. As an immigration attorney who has helped many thousands of physicians and nurses immigrate to the U.S. over the last 20 years, I have observed that the severe nursing shortage in the U.S., as well as the economic disparities between the two countries, make this all but inevitable. Since U.S. hospitals benefit significantly from RNs trained in the Philippines, it's time for our country to invest in the training of Filipino nurses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997
When I read that 111,794 illegal aliens were deported in the past year, including more than 50,000 criminals (Oct. 31), the absurdity of the statement overwhelmed me. If 111,794 illegal aliens were deported in the last year, then the number of criminals deported was far above the 50,000 you reported; in fact, precisely 111,794 criminals were deported. Illegal aliens are, in fact, criminals. Illegal presence in the United States by a foreign national is a federal crime. When is The Times going to perceive the overwhelming, documented evidence and recognize illegal immigration for the enormous problem it actually is?
OPINION
November 1, 1992
I was pleased to see your editorial "Bush vs. Clinton: What Would Be Best Immigration Policy?" (Oct. 26). Immigration policy has been almost totally ignored by the presidential candidates. The editorial properly places the issue of immigration against a broader background of trade agreements, foreign policy and the need for economic development in Third World countries. As an attorney who worked for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service prior to entering private practice, I believe that the steps advocated by The Times would go a long way toward solving some critical immigration problems.
OPINION
July 13, 2009
Re " July 2 This is the best solution. However, I take issue with the characterization that businesses are unwittingly hiring illegals, because they can easily check the validity of the Social Security numbers using E-Verify. Los Angeles attorney Carl Shusterman's argument that the workers will "simply find another job" isn't valid because if companies know that they will eventually get audited, then they will avoid taking the chance of being fined or even prosecuted. As for the Chamber of Commerce, stating that Immigration and Customs Enforcement should only go after those companies that are exploiting workers and violating labor and worker-safety laws is tantamount to saying that businesses should be allowed to hire illegal immigrants as long as they pay them the minimum wage and follow OSHA rules.
NEWS
September 4, 1988
I read Paul Ciotti's article "Unhappy Lawyers" (Aug. 25) with great interest. I happen to be one of those rare lawyers who loves his work. Imagine my shock in reading that, according to one lawyer, only a person with "a deranged sensibility" could enjoy the day-to-day practice of law which "largely consists of arguing with other people about money." My work could not be more different from the type of law described in the article. True, my work is so interesting that I often put in long hours.
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