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Carleton Carly Fiorina

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BUSINESS
December 8, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-profile reign of Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Carly Fiorina may be nearing an end. Fiorina, the nation's most powerful female executive, had pinned her company's future on the merger with Compaq Computer Corp. Now, with the deal in serious jeopardy, she is facing stinging criticism about her judgment. "I don't think she can survive this," said Rob Enderle, a technology analyst with Giga Information Group, echoing the views of many others.
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BUSINESS
August 27, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
The late cultural critic Neil Postman used to pose a simple question to gauge whether a new technology was worth the investment: "What is the problem," he would ask, "to which this is the solution?" That question occurred to me last week as I contemplated the looming U.S. Senate candidacy of Carly Fiorina. The Republican, who was ousted as chairwoman and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co. in 2005, took a first step in that direction last week by filing tax papers for a political fundraising committee.
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NEWS
July 20, 1999 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silicon Valley pioneer and corporate icon Hewlett-Packard Co. on Monday named as chief executive Carleton "Carly" Fiorina, already the most powerful businesswoman in America, who earned the reputation at Lucent Technologies as a fearless, high-energy corporate leader. The move by the No. 2 computer company makes Fiorina the first female leader of a blue-chip company and a standout in the high-technology sector, an industry dominated by men.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co. paid Chief Executive Mark Hurd $24.4 million last year in salary, bonus, stock options and other compensation. The Palo Alto-based company also paid ousted CEO Carly Fiorina $22.3 million last year in salary and severance. Fiorina, who worked for three months in 2005, earned $575,287 in salary and the rest in severance. Hurd, who took over April 1, received $816,667 in salary, a bonus of $5.13 million and stock and options worth $9.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN
Two and a half years ago, new Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Carly Fiorina was the belle of corporate America, an engaging marketing whiz who had just become the first woman to lead one of the 30 blue-chip companies in the Dow Jones industrial average. As the glamorous outsider reorganized the sleepy Silicon Valley powerhouse, HP's stock fell by more than half. The honeymoon ended.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his most pointed remarks to date, dissident Hewlett-Packard Co. director Walter Hewlett used a conference call with investors Tuesday to increase his criticism of HP Chief Executive Carly Fiorina and reiterate his prediction that she'll lose her job if shareholders reject HP's acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp. "She has made this merger a referendum on herself," Hewlett said in his first conference call for all HP investors and the public.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co. paid Chief Executive Mark Hurd $24.4 million last year in salary, bonus, stock options and other compensation. The Palo Alto-based company also paid ousted CEO Carly Fiorina $22.3 million last year in salary and severance. Fiorina, who worked for three months in 2005, earned $575,287 in salary and the rest in severance. Hurd, who took over April 1, received $816,667 in salary, a bonus of $5.13 million and stock and options worth $9.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for dissident Hewlett-Packard Co. director Walter Hewlett introduced a litany of damaging internal company reports Tuesday that paint HP's $19-billion merger with Compaq Computer Corp. as a disaster in the making. But in the first day of the trial over Hewlett's lawsuit challenging the merger, HP Chief Executive Carly Fiorina denied misleading shareholders about the financial prospects for the combined companies.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Carly Fiorina, the recently ousted chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., is in the running to be the next president of the World Bank, a Bush administration official said Tuesday. Fiorina is the latest person to emerge as a candidate to replace World Bank President James Wolfensohn. He is stepping down as head of the development bank June 1 at the end of his second five-year term. The Financial Times reported Tuesday that U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Carly Fiorina, the Hewlett-Packard Co. chief executive deposed last winter for failing to deliver enough benefits from the company's acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp., is writing a book about her career. The memoir, currently untitled, is scheduled to be published next year by Portfolio, an imprint of Penguin Group USA.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Carly Fiorina, the Hewlett-Packard Co. chief executive deposed last winter for failing to deliver enough benefits from the company's acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp., is writing a book about her career. The memoir, currently untitled, is scheduled to be published next year by Portfolio, an imprint of Penguin Group USA.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Carly Fiorina, the recently ousted chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., is in the running to be the next president of the World Bank, a Bush administration official said Tuesday. Fiorina is the latest person to emerge as a candidate to replace World Bank President James Wolfensohn. He is stepping down as head of the development bank June 1 at the end of his second five-year term. The Financial Times reported Tuesday that U.S.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | Alex Pham and Jon Healey, Times Staff Writers
Carly's out. Now what? Wednesday's resignation of Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive and Chairwoman Carly Fiorina -- so high-profile a figure she's known in Silicon Valley by her first name alone -- triggered a flurry of predictions about the high-tech company's future. Some industry experts said HP should sell or spin off its printing business. Some said it should expand Fiorina's foray into entertainment technology and consumer electronics.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Joining a scramble to transform entertainment technology in the living room, Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Carly Fiorina is pushing into the consumer electronics business with new products that store, play and distribute digital music, pictures and movies. On Friday at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Fiorina unveiled updated Digital Entertainment Centers, or personal computers that receive and record high-definition television broadcasts.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for dissident Hewlett-Packard Co. director Walter Hewlett introduced a litany of damaging internal company reports Tuesday that paint HP's $19-billion merger with Compaq Computer Corp. as a disaster in the making. But in the first day of the trial over Hewlett's lawsuit challenging the merger, HP Chief Executive Carly Fiorina denied misleading shareholders about the financial prospects for the combined companies.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his most pointed remarks to date, dissident Hewlett-Packard Co. director Walter Hewlett used a conference call with investors Tuesday to increase his criticism of HP Chief Executive Carly Fiorina and reiterate his prediction that she'll lose her job if shareholders reject HP's acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp. "She has made this merger a referendum on herself," Hewlett said in his first conference call for all HP investors and the public.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | Alex Pham and Jon Healey, Times Staff Writers
Carly's out. Now what? Wednesday's resignation of Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive and Chairwoman Carly Fiorina -- so high-profile a figure she's known in Silicon Valley by her first name alone -- triggered a flurry of predictions about the high-tech company's future. Some industry experts said HP should sell or spin off its printing business. Some said it should expand Fiorina's foray into entertainment technology and consumer electronics.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2000 | CESCA ANTONELLI, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Hewlett-Packard Co. is facing the first rumblings of investor dissent against Chief Executive Carly Fiorina. The No. 2 computer maker said last month that it is in talks to buy the consulting business of PricewaterhouseCoopers for $17 billion to $18 billion. Investors have grown increasingly jittery about the possibility and say it would be the wrong move.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN
Two and a half years ago, new Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Carly Fiorina was the belle of corporate America, an engaging marketing whiz who had just become the first woman to lead one of the 30 blue-chip companies in the Dow Jones industrial average. As the glamorous outsider reorganized the sleepy Silicon Valley powerhouse, HP's stock fell by more than half. The honeymoon ended.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-profile reign of Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Carly Fiorina may be nearing an end. Fiorina, the nation's most powerful female executive, had pinned her company's future on the merger with Compaq Computer Corp. Now, with the deal in serious jeopardy, she is facing stinging criticism about her judgment. "I don't think she can survive this," said Rob Enderle, a technology analyst with Giga Information Group, echoing the views of many others.
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