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NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez, impeached in 1993 and later convicted of corruption, completed his sentence of more than two years under house arrest and began laying the groundwork for a political comeback. Perez, 73, hopes to return to the Senate in 1998, but the state is still investigating his finances, and the party he helped found 55 years ago, Democratic Action, has kicked him out.
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NEWS
May 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former President Carlos Andres Perez was convicted of corruption and sentenced to 28 months' house arrest. The sentence means that Perez, 73, who has already completed two years' house arrest in his luxury colonial home overlooking Caracas, the capital, should walk free in about four months.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former President Carlos Andres Perez was convicted of corruption and sentenced to 28 months' house arrest. The sentence means that Perez, 73, who has already completed two years' house arrest in his luxury colonial home overlooking Caracas, the capital, should walk free in about four months.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Carlos Andres Perez appointed several political opponents to his Cabinet in a major reshuffling designed to broaden his support and overcome a leadership crisis. The president, under pressure to resign since a failed Feb. 4 coup attempt, shuffled seven ministers as part of a promise to cobble together a unity government. The changes demonstrated Perez's willingness to dump even valued ministers for the sake of polishing the government's image.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez, impeached in 1993 and later convicted of corruption, completed his sentence of more than two years under house arrest and began laying the groundwork for a political comeback. Perez, 73, hopes to return to the Senate in 1998, but the state is still investigating his finances, and the party he helped found 55 years ago, Democratic Action, has kicked him out.
NEWS
January 15, 1989
Venezuelan President-elect Carlos Andres Perez announced his new Cabinet, placing most key economic posts in the hands of technocrats, some of them American-trained, rather than party regulars. Perez, who takes office Feb. 2, has promised to reverse the decline in living standards in South America's richest country, brought on by falling oil prices. He has also promised to take a harder stance on repaying Venezuela's $32 billion in foreign debt.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | Associated Press
Other leaders have predicted better times are coming, but President Carlos Andres Perez is betting his homeland on it. Perez says he will seek asylum in another country if next year's inflation goes over 40%, half this year's projected rate. In statements published in Saturday newspapers, he said the government's economic reform plan and measures to keep down inflation are working well. "We won't go over 80% . . .
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suspension and impending corruption trial of President Carlos Andres Perez threatens to stall the economic modernization program that has made Venezuela one of the Western Hemisphere's most attractive investment targets and fastest growing economies, according to diplomats and business sources. At less risk, at least in the short run, these experts say, is a policy that has permitted gradual but increasingly important foreign investment in Venezuela's once-isolated oil industry.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Carlos Andres Perez, a survivor of two failed military revolts, bloody street riots and a party mutiny, was suspended from office Friday by the Venezuelan Senate and ordered to stand trial on corruption charges that could send him to jail for three years. By a unanimous show of hands, the 49-member Senate approved a resolution turning the 70-year-old Perez over to the Supreme Court for trial on two charges of misusing $17 million of government funds.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that enough evidence exists to prosecute President Carlos Andres Perez on corruption charges and turned the matter over to Venezuela's Senate to determine if there should be a trial. The indictment was voted by nine members of the court with six abstentions. If tried and convicted, Perez could go to jail for six months to three years. He stands accused of the misallocation of $17 million in government funds.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
Rebels tried Friday to overthrow President Carlos Andres Perez for the second time this year, claiming to act on behalf of the growing legions of poor in this oil-rich nation racked by corruption. At least 50 people were killed in Caracas and Maracay, site of the country's main air base, before the revolt was put down and some top military officers were arrested, a government source said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Two men were shot and killed by security forces Monday when their speeding truck raced toward a ceremony in a western town attended by President Carlos Andres Perez, government officials said. Perez was unhurt, but at least 11 people were injured in the incident, officials said. Television and radio reports said gunmen had fired at the president, but the chief government spokesman described the shooting incident as confusing and denied there had been an assassination attempt.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Carlos Andres Perez appointed several political opponents to his Cabinet in a major reshuffling designed to broaden his support and overcome a leadership crisis. The president, under pressure to resign since a failed Feb. 4 coup attempt, shuffled seven ministers as part of a promise to cobble together a unity government. The changes demonstrated Perez's willingness to dump even valued ministers for the sake of polishing the government's image.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Carlos Andres Perez's restructuring of the military after last week's coup attempt is unlikely to succeed in eradicating subversion within the armed forces, government and retired military officials said Tuesday. They explained that support among mid-level officers for the coup leaders was so widespread that Perez cannot possibly weed out all of the rebels' clandestine sympathizers.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hours after scores of Venezuelan security police stormed the office of the major opposition newspaper, President Carlos Andres Perez on Monday finally gave into national and international demands that he call off a campaign against the nation's press. Perez had come under severe criticism at home and abroad for trying to prevent the publication of advertisements and commentary linking the Feb.
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