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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Carlos Castaneda, 70, the publisher emeritus of El Nuevo Herald in Miami who worked in the Spanish-language press for more than five decades, died Thursday in Lisbon of complications from leukemia. Castaneda, who spent 28 years of his career as editor and publisher of El Nuevo Dia in Puerto Rico, was hospitalized Tuesday while on vacation in Portugal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
They were an unlikely couple, the Latin American immigrant and the West Virginia divorcee whose paths crossed in mid-1950s Los Angeles. But, by Margaret Runyan Castaneda's account, she and Carlos Castaneda were kindred spirits whose time together helped turn him into a countercultural phenomenon. Carlos wrote "The Teachings of Don Juan," a 1968 bestseller that told of his peyote-fueled adventures with Don Juan Matus, a Mexican shaman who purportedly guided him to an alternate realm inhabited by giant insects, witches and flying humans.
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NEWS
June 19, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Castaneda, the self-proclaimed "sorcerer" and best-selling author whose tales of drug-induced mental adventures with a Yaqui Indian shaman named Don Juan once fascinated the world, apparently died two months ago in the same way that he lived: quietly, secretly, mysteriously. He was believed to be 72. Castaneda died April 27 at his home in Westwood, according to entertainment lawyer Deborah Drooz, a friend of Castaneda and the executor of his estate. The cause of death was liver cancer.
SPORTS
December 20, 2009 | T.J. Simers
These people live among you: Rosemary Patterson: "I can appreciate how you feel about the Sunderland (sailing) situation. It's scary, and there's a good chance this girl might not make it home. . . . If Abby Sunderland doesn't make it home, she will at least die doing what she loved and wanted to do. Life is not just a time of breathing and playing it safe. There are always risks in life." I find reading my e-mail to be one of them. Francisco R. Gomez: "I read your pitiful diatribe against the Sunderland Family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
They were an unlikely couple, the Latin American immigrant and the West Virginia divorcee whose paths crossed in mid-1950s Los Angeles. But, by Margaret Runyan Castaneda's account, she and Carlos Castaneda were kindred spirits whose time together helped turn him into a countercultural phenomenon. Carlos wrote "The Teachings of Don Juan," a 1968 bestseller that told of his peyote-fueled adventures with Don Juan Matus, a Mexican shaman who purportedly guided him to an alternate realm inhabited by giant insects, witches and flying humans.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carlos Castaneda, the 20th century's own sorcerer's apprentice, has been nearly invisible for 25 years. Not that he was ever exactly in plain view. The author of nine books based on his experiences with Juan Matus, a Yaqui seer, Castaneda has been seen as a bridge to the unknown by millions of spiritual seekers--especially in the soul-searching '60s and '70s. Now he's back. Or was back. Castaneda was center attraction earlier this month in Anaheim at a two-day "Tensegrity" seminar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Plus, dueling Tommy burgers . . . Last bites and last rites . . . Seer sues tabloid. A Georgia man who says he is the only son of Carlos Castaneda is contesting the reclusive writer's will, alleging in court papers that it was drafted by the executor and that the signature is a forgery. "It's just madness," responded the executor, Los Angeles entertainment attorney Deborah Drooz. She denied doing anything improper and said Adrian Vashon is not the writer's son. Vashon, a.k.a. Carlton J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Kevin Crust;Kevin Thomas;Carina Chocano
Ralph Torjan's trippy documentary, "Carlos Castaneda: Enigma of a Sorcerer," provokes more questions than it answers about the bestselling author and New Age guru who died under mysterious circumstances in 1998. The film primarily consists of interviews with followers and skeptics who discuss the legitimacy of his teachings.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
PIANO MUSIC FOR FOUR HANDS By Roger Grenier. Translated from the French by Alice Kaplan University of Nebraska Press: 176 pp., $45, $15 paper French writers of the last generation seem to have a genius for brevity. Here, Roger Grenier has collapsed three generations, two world wars, the history of an ancient regional ethnic prejudice, a sophisticated love of music and many relationships into, shall we say, a slender volume.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Fathers and sons . . . Oldies but goodies . . . .Defamation double whammy . . . Dogfight at 37,000 feet. A Georgia man is not the son of the late mystic writer Carlos Castaneda and has no standing to contest his will, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled. Judge Robert A. Letteau tossed out Adrian Vashon's challenge to Castaneda's will, which now can move toward probate. The tall, blond Vashon, a.k.a. Adrian Gerritsen, a.k.a. Carlton J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Kevin Crust;Kevin Thomas;Carina Chocano
Ralph Torjan's trippy documentary, "Carlos Castaneda: Enigma of a Sorcerer," provokes more questions than it answers about the bestselling author and New Age guru who died under mysterious circumstances in 1998. The film primarily consists of interviews with followers and skeptics who discuss the legitimacy of his teachings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Carlos Castaneda, 70, the publisher emeritus of El Nuevo Herald in Miami who worked in the Spanish-language press for more than five decades, died Thursday in Lisbon of complications from leukemia. Castaneda, who spent 28 years of his career as editor and publisher of El Nuevo Dia in Puerto Rico, was hospitalized Tuesday while on vacation in Portugal.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
PIANO MUSIC FOR FOUR HANDS By Roger Grenier. Translated from the French by Alice Kaplan University of Nebraska Press: 176 pp., $45, $15 paper French writers of the last generation seem to have a genius for brevity. Here, Roger Grenier has collapsed three generations, two world wars, the history of an ancient regional ethnic prejudice, a sophisticated love of music and many relationships into, shall we say, a slender volume.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Fathers and sons . . . Oldies but goodies . . . .Defamation double whammy . . . Dogfight at 37,000 feet. A Georgia man is not the son of the late mystic writer Carlos Castaneda and has no standing to contest his will, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled. Judge Robert A. Letteau tossed out Adrian Vashon's challenge to Castaneda's will, which now can move toward probate. The tall, blond Vashon, a.k.a. Adrian Gerritsen, a.k.a. Carlton J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Plus, dueling Tommy burgers . . . Last bites and last rites . . . Seer sues tabloid. A Georgia man who says he is the only son of Carlos Castaneda is contesting the reclusive writer's will, alleging in court papers that it was drafted by the executor and that the signature is a forgery. "It's just madness," responded the executor, Los Angeles entertainment attorney Deborah Drooz. She denied doing anything improper and said Adrian Vashon is not the writer's son. Vashon, a.k.a. Carlton J.
NEWS
June 19, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Castaneda, the self-proclaimed "sorcerer" and best-selling author whose tales of drug-induced mental adventures with a Yaqui Indian shaman named Don Juan once fascinated the world, apparently died two months ago in the same way that he lived: quietly, secretly, mysteriously. He was believed to be 72. Castaneda died April 27 at his home in Westwood, according to entertainment lawyer Deborah Drooz, a friend of Castaneda and the executor of his estate. The cause of death was liver cancer.
NEWS
December 26, 1995
When Benjamin Epstein caught up with Carlos Castaneda in Anaheim to ask if he would agree to an interview, Castaneda unexpectedly invited him to join his party for lunch. In a conversation over a this-worldly melted cheese sandwich, side of bacon and fries, Castaneda was personable and spontaneous. Here's some of what he had to say. Question: Why don't you allow yourself to be photographed or tape recorded? Answer: A recording is a way of fixing you in time.
SPORTS
December 20, 2009 | T.J. Simers
These people live among you: Rosemary Patterson: "I can appreciate how you feel about the Sunderland (sailing) situation. It's scary, and there's a good chance this girl might not make it home. . . . If Abby Sunderland doesn't make it home, she will at least die doing what she loved and wanted to do. Life is not just a time of breathing and playing it safe. There are always risks in life." I find reading my e-mail to be one of them. Francisco R. Gomez: "I read your pitiful diatribe against the Sunderland Family.
NEWS
December 26, 1995
When Benjamin Epstein caught up with Carlos Castaneda in Anaheim to ask if he would agree to an interview, Castaneda unexpectedly invited him to join his party for lunch. In a conversation over a this-worldly melted cheese sandwich, side of bacon and fries, Castaneda was personable and spontaneous. Here's some of what he had to say. Question: Why don't you allow yourself to be photographed or tape recorded? Answer: A recording is a way of fixing you in time.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carlos Castaneda, the 20th century's own sorcerer's apprentice, has been nearly invisible for 25 years. Not that he was ever exactly in plain view. The author of nine books based on his experiences with Juan Matus, a Yaqui seer, Castaneda has been seen as a bridge to the unknown by millions of spiritual seekers--especially in the soul-searching '60s and '70s. Now he's back. Or was back. Castaneda was center attraction earlier this month in Anaheim at a two-day "Tensegrity" seminar.
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