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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | Hector Becerra
Carlos Jackson, the director of the Los Angeles County Housing Authority criticized for his agency's handling of a $200-million program for the county's poor and for allegedly concealing shortcomings, has retired. The director for 17 years, Jackson has acknowledged failures in his agency's management of Section 8 vouchers. In February, federal auditors called for his ouster. In a memo to his employees this week, Jackson said he had informed the county Board of Supervisors of his decision to retire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | Hector Becerra
Carlos Jackson, the director of the Los Angeles County Housing Authority criticized for his agency's handling of a $200-million program for the county's poor and for allegedly concealing shortcomings, has retired. The director for 17 years, Jackson has acknowledged failures in his agency's management of Section 8 vouchers. In February, federal auditors called for his ouster. In a memo to his employees this week, Jackson said he had informed the county Board of Supervisors of his decision to retire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992
In your commendable editorial about the need to replace defense jobs, you noted "two nonprofit organizations have created the Aerospace Industry Task Force to track laid-off defense workers and to identify new training opportunities for them." Correctly, it was the County Board of Supervisors that created the task force. The agencies to which you referred are the Economic Development Corp. and the Community Development Commission, the housing and community development arm of the county.
OPINION
February 24, 2002
"Good turns" can be performed by individuals or teams. Your inspiring Feb. 17 story about Gloria Garcia appropriately gave recognition to this fine volunteer at the Community Resource Center in South Whittier. Another inspiring story is the collective "good turn" that a team of players performed for that community. The L.A. County Community Development Commission, which owns and operates the CRC, has spent over eight years working in partnership with the South Whittier community and Supervisors Gloria Molina and Don Knabe to revitalize that low- and moderate-income area.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995
James Flanigan made the point in a recent column ("Capital Offensive," Oct. 25) that the need in the inner city is not more welfare but more capital formation. As usual, Flanigan was right on the money, so to speak. To a growing extent, local government recognizes that need. The Community Development Bank is only the latest entry in government's parade of efforts. Of less notoriety is the Los Angeles County Community Development Commission's Micro-Loan Program. That program is of value because it provides below-prime-rate loans for "wanna-be" entrepreneurs as well as for existing businesses.
OPINION
October 31, 1993
The public will have an opportunity to vote Tuesday on a constitutional amendment, Prop. 168, to update an archaic law, Article 34, that requires local governments to hold an election before building publicly supported housing. That law, passed in 1950 and no longer relevant to today's needs, adds red tape to affordable housing production and is a barrier to construction jobs. Government no longer builds large public housing developments for families. Instead, subsidized housing is well designed and built on small, scattered sites.
OPINION
February 24, 2002
"Good turns" can be performed by individuals or teams. Your inspiring Feb. 17 story about Gloria Garcia appropriately gave recognition to this fine volunteer at the Community Resource Center in South Whittier. Another inspiring story is the collective "good turn" that a team of players performed for that community. The L.A. County Community Development Commission, which owns and operates the CRC, has spent over eight years working in partnership with the South Whittier community and Supervisors Gloria Molina and Don Knabe to revitalize that low- and moderate-income area.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Postal Service plans to seek damages from the owner of a pit bull described as "a canine crocodile" that attacked a mail carrier. Postal spokesman Dan Demiglio said that because the dog's owner, identified by humane officers as Carlos Jackson, turned the dog in, mail will again be delivered to the two-block area near Mills College. Mail deliveries to the neighborhood stopped after the attack on carrier Cecil Ivey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1997 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
A $1.1-million federal loan to rebuild a San Fernando apartment complex destroyed by the Northridge earthquake was approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. The loan, administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's HOME Investment Partnerships Program, will be used to build 11 units at 2020 2nd St., the site of an apartment house that was heavily damaged by the January 1994 quake and later torn down. The owners of the property--Severyn I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000
"PC Pediatricians" (Dec. 7), about the inner-city telemedicine center, omitted the fine work performed by my staff at the county Community Development Commission, which includes the Housing Authority agency. The commission has formed a unique partnership with Drew University. We provided the crucial seed money to get the program off the ground and have jointly secured additional funding and support. This led to the opening of ophthalmology telemedicine centers at two of our public housing sites and now a third telemedicine center specializing in pediatrics.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995
James Flanigan made the point in a recent column ("Capital Offensive," Oct. 25) that the need in the inner city is not more welfare but more capital formation. As usual, Flanigan was right on the money, so to speak. To a growing extent, local government recognizes that need. The Community Development Bank is only the latest entry in government's parade of efforts. Of less notoriety is the Los Angeles County Community Development Commission's Micro-Loan Program. That program is of value because it provides below-prime-rate loans for "wanna-be" entrepreneurs as well as for existing businesses.
OPINION
October 31, 1993
The public will have an opportunity to vote Tuesday on a constitutional amendment, Prop. 168, to update an archaic law, Article 34, that requires local governments to hold an election before building publicly supported housing. That law, passed in 1950 and no longer relevant to today's needs, adds red tape to affordable housing production and is a barrier to construction jobs. Government no longer builds large public housing developments for families. Instead, subsidized housing is well designed and built on small, scattered sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992
In your commendable editorial about the need to replace defense jobs, you noted "two nonprofit organizations have created the Aerospace Industry Task Force to track laid-off defense workers and to identify new training opportunities for them." Correctly, it was the County Board of Supervisors that created the task force. The agencies to which you referred are the Economic Development Corp. and the Community Development Commission, the housing and community development arm of the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1993
We at the Business Finance Center (BFC) are concerned that your April 28 article ("SBA's Shortfall Deals Big Setback to Small Business"), although accurate, will inadvertently mislead readers and discourage entrepreneurs from pursuing or completing real estate transactions with SBA assistance. There were an extensive number of small businesses attempting to acquire property through the SBA 7a loan program prior to April 28. (This is the SBA loan program that is currently "short of funds" or loan guarantees.
REAL ESTATE
August 23, 1992
Carlos Jackson's call in Speaking Out ("How About Housing Help as Job Benefit?" Aug. 16) for housing subsidies (on top of wages and salaries) as a way of coping with the outlandish cost of Southland housing, makes about as much sense as subsidizing the cost of dope to raise junkies' standard of living. When an ordinary home in a decent part of town hovers around a quarter million dollars, and only one out of five families even qualifies for financing of a "median" home, things have gone beyond reason.
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