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Carlos Reygadas

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
When "Post Tenebras Lux" premiered at last year's Cannes Film Festival, it was mostly met with boos and pans, yet days later Carlos Reygadas won the festival's best director prize. It is that sort of polarized response to his work overall and "Post Tenebras Lux" in particular, that recently lead the critic Tony Rayns to refer to the Mexican filmmaker as "one of the most admired/hated figures in contemporary cinema. " Opening in Los Angeles on June 7, "Post Tenebras Lux" begins with a little girl running through a muddy field amid various animals, her wobble-legged enthusiasm unflagging even as the sun is dipping behind a mountain range.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Robert Abele
To be in the thrall of Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas' beautiful, hypnotic images is to be alive to the decorous, the monstrous and the ridiculous, but also to feel deeply how they might interconnect. Entering the impressionistic hodgepodge that is his latest meditation, "Post Tenebras Lux," which won Reygadas the director prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival, moviegoers beholden to clean narrative may feel they need their own explanatory GPS and audio guide. But the richer reward lies in allowing oneself to be led by this gifted director's instinct for lyrical, sensory exploration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
For "Battle in Heaven," as he did with his acclaimed debut feature "Japon," boldly idiosyncratic Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas asks audiences to plunge headlong into his chaotic vision of the world, no questions asked but complete trust required. Not everyone is going to be willing or able to take this leap of faith, but those who do go along with Reygadas may well feel they have come away having undergone a stunning revelatory experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
When "Post Tenebras Lux" premiered at last year's Cannes Film Festival, it was mostly met with boos and pans, yet days later Carlos Reygadas won the festival's best director prize. It is that sort of polarized response to his work overall and "Post Tenebras Lux" in particular, that recently lead the critic Tony Rayns to refer to the Mexican filmmaker as "one of the most admired/hated figures in contemporary cinema. " Opening in Los Angeles on June 7, "Post Tenebras Lux" begins with a little girl running through a muddy field amid various animals, her wobble-legged enthusiasm unflagging even as the sun is dipping behind a mountain range.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
There are all sorts of reasons we go to the movies -- to be soothed or excited or to hide out in the dark -- but at their most sublime, film transports us out of the here and the now. It sounds corny to talk about transcendence and the movies, especially when the medium and its rituals have become so desecularized, yet the promise that a picture will carry us away sustains the movie lover's faith. Some filmmakers give us dreams and false worlds in which we can find refuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
OBVIOUSLY, Carlos Reygadas hasn't flown all this way from Madrid just to talk about oral sex. But lately it's been a tough subject for him to avoid. Ever since last summer, when the young Mexican writer-director's second feature film, "Batalla en el Cielo" (Battle in Heaven), played at Cannes, there's been some predictable squawking over what might be called the film's highly original opening scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Robert Abele
To be in the thrall of Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas' beautiful, hypnotic images is to be alive to the decorous, the monstrous and the ridiculous, but also to feel deeply how they might interconnect. Entering the impressionistic hodgepodge that is his latest meditation, "Post Tenebras Lux," which won Reygadas the director prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival, moviegoers beholden to clean narrative may feel they need their own explanatory GPS and audio guide. But the richer reward lies in allowing oneself to be led by this gifted director's instinct for lyrical, sensory exploration.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Carlos Reygadas admits that when he first heard the concept behind the new movie "Revolución" — a compilation of 10 short films by 10 different Mexican directors — he felt "a little reluctant" to join in. Omnibus movies, he knew, often add up to less than the sum of their parts. And the theme of this particular film came spring-loaded with significance: the legacy of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920. Furthermore, the movie's release would be timed to coincide with this year's heavily hyped centennial celebrations taking place on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - Watching a film get an award is rarely as moving and emotional as watching the film itself, but that was the experience Sunday night at the Cannes Film Festival when Michael Haneke's"Amour" won the Palme d'Or. The applause for the Austrian Haneke, who also won the Palme in 2009 for"The White Ribbon,"increased as he called onto the stage his film's pair of veteran French stars, 81-year-old Jean Louis Trintignant and 85-year old Emmanuelle Riva. "It is their film," the director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Two or three years ago, if you asked the so-called Three Amigos -- Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu -- to name the most promising young contemporary Mexican director, their voices would unite in praise of Carlos Reygadas. They weren't alone in that opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - Watching a film get an award is rarely as moving and emotional as watching the film itself, but that was the experience Sunday night at the Cannes Film Festival when Michael Haneke's"Amour" won the Palme d'Or. The applause for the Austrian Haneke, who also won the Palme in 2009 for"The White Ribbon,"increased as he called onto the stage his film's pair of veteran French stars, 81-year-old Jean Louis Trintignant and 85-year old Emmanuelle Riva. "It is their film," the director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Carlos Reygadas admits that when he first heard the concept behind the new movie "Revolución" — a compilation of 10 short films by 10 different Mexican directors — he felt "a little reluctant" to join in. Omnibus movies, he knew, often add up to less than the sum of their parts. And the theme of this particular film came spring-loaded with significance: the legacy of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920. Furthermore, the movie's release would be timed to coincide with this year's heavily hyped centennial celebrations taking place on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Two or three years ago, if you asked the so-called Three Amigos -- Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu -- to name the most promising young contemporary Mexican director, their voices would unite in praise of Carlos Reygadas. They weren't alone in that opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
For "Battle in Heaven," as he did with his acclaimed debut feature "Japon," boldly idiosyncratic Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas asks audiences to plunge headlong into his chaotic vision of the world, no questions asked but complete trust required. Not everyone is going to be willing or able to take this leap of faith, but those who do go along with Reygadas may well feel they have come away having undergone a stunning revelatory experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
OBVIOUSLY, Carlos Reygadas hasn't flown all this way from Madrid just to talk about oral sex. But lately it's been a tough subject for him to avoid. Ever since last summer, when the young Mexican writer-director's second feature film, "Batalla en el Cielo" (Battle in Heaven), played at Cannes, there's been some predictable squawking over what might be called the film's highly original opening scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
There are all sorts of reasons we go to the movies -- to be soothed or excited or to hide out in the dark -- but at their most sublime, film transports us out of the here and the now. It sounds corny to talk about transcendence and the movies, especially when the medium and its rituals have become so desecularized, yet the promise that a picture will carry us away sustains the movie lover's faith. Some filmmakers give us dreams and false worlds in which we can find refuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Rather than the large-scale stadiums he usually appears at, Bruce Springsteen will soon be coming to a theater near you. Material submitted by more than 2,000 Springsteen fans around the world makes up the film "Springsteen & I. " Billed as "a collective filmmaking experience," the movie is credited to director Baillie Walsh and will hit cinemas July 22 and July 30, playing at some 500 theaters across the country,  including 29 in the Los Angeles...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Claudio Caballero, an ambitious young concert promoter, uses his girlfriend's money to place a bet on a soccer game in the hopes of funding his dream to bring a U2 concert to his town. When he loses the bet, and his plan to rip-off the bookies goes awry, he is given seven days to make the concert happen or else. Such is the story of "7 Días," the disappointingly flat debut feature from Mexican writer and director Fernando Kalife.
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