Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCarlos Salinas De Gortari
IN THE NEWS

Carlos Salinas De Gortari

NEWS
November 27, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari broke six months of silence Sunday to say that his elder brother "will have to explain clearly the amount and origin" of tens of millions of dollars in Swiss bank accounts that prosecutors in Mexico and Switzerland have linked to him.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley met with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari on Wednesday to lend his support to the Mexican leader's efforts to negotiate a free-trade agreement with the United States. During the half-hour meeting at the Los Pinos presidential residence, Bradley and Salinas discussed the importance of economic and cultural exchanges between the two countries.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Embassy issued a statement Thursday contradicting CIA Director William H. Webster's assessment that Mexico's economic and political condition is fragile and that the country is potentially unstable. Meanwhile, a spokesman for President Carlos Salinas de Gortari charged that Webster's remarks at a breakfast meeting with reporters and editors of The Times' Washington Bureau "reflect a profound misunderstanding" of Mexico.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari and President Bush on Tuesday pledged mutual trust and understanding on cross-boundary issues, agreeing to conduct trade negotiations and to clean up pollution in Mexico City and Tijuana. To mark Salinas' visit to Washington, the two governments signed seven agreements on trade, the environment, investment and tourism. The agreements, Bush said in praising the "closeness" of U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve the government's human rights image--and possibly its record--President Carlos Salinas de Gortari on Monday replaced his attorney general and his interior secretary, the official who oversees elections and political reform. Salinas also named one of his oldest friends, Emilio Lozoya Thalmann, as secretary of energy and mines, immediately raising speculation about the race to succeed the president in 1994.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, widely credited in the United States with having opened up the long-sheltered Mexican economy, is scheduled to begin an intensive, three-day trip to California in San Diego today. The Mexican president is slated to make later appearances in San Francisco, Los Angeles and at Stanford University in Palo Alto.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since he left Mexico in disgrace 20 months ago, former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari was interrogated Wednesday by Mexican federal investigators probing the 1994 assassination of his handpicked successor. Mexico's attorney general and foreign secretary confirmed that prosecutors questioned Salinas for 12 hours at the Mexican Embassy in Dublin, the Irish capital, where the former president has been living in self-exile for several months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The passion and controversy surrounding the 1988 Mexican presidential election are likely to erupt again this weekend when President Carlos Salinas de Gortari and his chief antagonist, Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, come to Los Angeles to visit their expatriate countrymen and supporters. In an unusual turn of events, the two men on Monday will be competing for favorable publicity in different parts of the city.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unsolved assassination of Mexican presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio has become a labyrinth of intrigue and suspicion in which solid evidence remains painfully scarce. Therefore, recent revelations--a letter written by Mexico's president and comments by the governor of Baja--have set off a furor among journalists and politicians, the social forces driving the case in the absence of progress by investigators.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari delivered his final "state of the nation" speech Tuesday, summarizing six years of dramatic economic reforms that have ended in a year of political upheaval. In his address to the Congress that was elected Aug. 21, Salinas reflected on the violence of 1994--the assassinations of two close allies, an Indian uprising and a rash of kidnapings-for-profit--and the profound effect it has had on this country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|