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Carlos Vives

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Since Cuban film producer Carlos Vives died in Havana last week at 71, tributes have floated in from newspapers and websites across the Spanish-speaking world. Except, of course, in the United States, where because of Cold War-era political rationales Cuban culture remains largely a taboo topic. By any measure, Vives was a cinematic mogul, with more than 130 works to his credit, including about 40 feature films. More significantly, he backed a number of movies that delved deep into the intricacies of Cuban society and the complex daily lives of ordinary people, while quietly challenging the island nation's communist orthodoxies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Since Cuban film producer Carlos Vives died in Havana last week at 71, tributes have floated in from newspapers and websites across the Spanish-speaking world. Except, of course, in the United States, where because of Cold War-era political rationales Cuban culture remains largely a taboo topic. By any measure, Vives was a cinematic mogul, with more than 130 works to his credit, including about 40 feature films. More significantly, he backed a number of movies that delved deep into the intricacies of Cuban society and the complex daily lives of ordinary people, while quietly challenging the island nation's communist orthodoxies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | ERNESTO LECHNER
There's a certain naturalness about the way Colombian singer Carlos Vives fuses rock 'n' roll with the traditional sounds of his land that makes his music an irresistible affair. The combination, as Vives demonstrated Saturday, the second of the three nights he was scheduled to perform at the House of Blues, is so well balanced that his material never stops surprising you, even within the same song. A furious electric guitar solo could at any moment give way to a sweetly hot accordion line.
WORLD
November 30, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
The performing style of the man Angel Marino calls the greatest marimba player ever may help explain why the instrument is so obscure outside the villages along Colombia's Pacific Coast mangroves. "He only played after dark and usually naked," Marino said. Marino, a virtuoso player of the xylophone-like instrument, said that until recently marimba masters kept it hidden from outsiders to preserve its mystical power to drive away evil spirits. The last time the marimba was in the international spotlight, Brian Jones was playing it on the Rolling Stones hit "Under My Thumb.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2005 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Carlos Vives began his raucous, two-hour performance Sunday at the Gibson Amphitheatre with the title track of his latest album, "El Rock de Mi Pueblo" ("The Rock of My People"). The song is the ultimate expression of the musical manifesto that the former soap opera star has been working on for the last 12 years. The way Vives sees it, the devilishly rhythmic cumbia and the accordion-heavy vallenato of his native Colombia are the South American equivalent of rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anybody who has spent at least the first 10 or 12 years of his or her life in Latin America will tell you: Reality there is experienced differently from the rest of the world. There's something about the brutal contrast between the opulently rich and the hopelessly poor, the indigenous culture and the European idiosyncrasy, the constant philosophizing and the passionate devotion to religion, that makes life south of the border a never-ending succession of miracles, small and big.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Vives is a man of contradictions. He preaches the equality of all people, yet says he would marry only a white woman. He speaks of the cultural unity of the Americas, yet his lyrics are unapologetically nationalistic. He sings endlessly of his love for Colombia, yet lives in Miami. He is one of Latin America's most acclaimed artists--on the same exclusive top tier as Juan Luis Guerra and Ruben Blades--yet began his career as a soap opera star.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
General Categories Record of the year: "La Negra Tiene Tumbao," Celia Cruz (Sergio George, producer; Jon Fausty, engineer-mixer); "Mentira," La Ley (Humberto Gatica & Kenny O'Brien, producers; Humberto Gatica, Cristian Robles & Eric Shilling, engineers-mixers); "Se Me Olvido," Gian Marco (Emilio Estefan Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Enrique Lopetegui
Calendar's pop staff surveys 40 of the nation's most popular or critically acclaimed albums : . CRISTIAN, "El camino del alma," Fonovisa. Despite an eclectic mix of styles and big-time guests, the Mexican romantic sensation's third album offers nothing new. . LUIS MIGUEL, "Segundo Romance," WEA Latina. Updated, well-produced versions of classic romantic bolero and tango songs, this will easily please fans and convert newcomers. . 1/2 CARLOS VIVES, "Clasicos de la Provincia," PolyGram Latino.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a frequent contributor to Calendar
The strongest contender so far for Latin pop album of the year, along with the Afro-Cuban excursions of two veteran players who only get better with age, make up this month's Latin Pulse, a look at the most noteworthy releases in the world of Latin music. *** 1/2 Carlos Vives, "El Amor de Mi Tierra," EMI Latin. Every year or so, an album comes out whose mission is to renew the listeners' faith in the weary genre of Latin pop.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2005 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Carlos Vives began his raucous, two-hour performance Sunday at the Gibson Amphitheatre with the title track of his latest album, "El Rock de Mi Pueblo" ("The Rock of My People"). The song is the ultimate expression of the musical manifesto that the former soap opera star has been working on for the last 12 years. The way Vives sees it, the devilishly rhythmic cumbia and the accordion-heavy vallenato of his native Colombia are the South American equivalent of rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of fans who nearly filled the Universal Amphitheatre on Saturday for a one-night stand by Carlos Vives had paid good money for their seats--but they barely used them. From the moment the Colombian singer started his two-hour show, the crowd was on its feet and refused to sit down the entire night. Actually, Vives' commanding performance wouldn't let them.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
General Categories Record of the year: "La Negra Tiene Tumbao," Celia Cruz (Sergio George, producer; Jon Fausty, engineer-mixer); "Mentira," La Ley (Humberto Gatica & Kenny O'Brien, producers; Humberto Gatica, Cristian Robles & Eric Shilling, engineers-mixers); "Se Me Olvido," Gian Marco (Emilio Estefan Jr.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Vives is a man of contradictions. He preaches the equality of all people, yet says he would marry only a white woman. He speaks of the cultural unity of the Americas, yet his lyrics are unapologetically nationalistic. He sings endlessly of his love for Colombia, yet lives in Miami. He is one of Latin America's most acclaimed artists--on the same exclusive top tier as Juan Luis Guerra and Ruben Blades--yet began his career as a soap opera star.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anybody who has spent at least the first 10 or 12 years of his or her life in Latin America will tell you: Reality there is experienced differently from the rest of the world. There's something about the brutal contrast between the opulently rich and the hopelessly poor, the indigenous culture and the European idiosyncrasy, the constant philosophizing and the passionate devotion to religion, that makes life south of the border a never-ending succession of miracles, small and big.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a frequent contributor to Calendar
The strongest contender so far for Latin pop album of the year, along with the Afro-Cuban excursions of two veteran players who only get better with age, make up this month's Latin Pulse, a look at the most noteworthy releases in the world of Latin music. *** 1/2 Carlos Vives, "El Amor de Mi Tierra," EMI Latin. Every year or so, an album comes out whose mission is to renew the listeners' faith in the weary genre of Latin pop.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1995 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First it was lambada , then it was bolero , then bachata . Now it is the turn for vallenato , the music that all of a sudden every Latin music fan seems to know . . . and love. Before 1993, vallenato was known only to Colombians--just older Colombians, for that matter--and the music was considered a low-class folk genre for the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of fans who nearly filled the Universal Amphitheatre on Saturday for a one-night stand by Carlos Vives had paid good money for their seats--but they barely used them. From the moment the Colombian singer started his two-hour show, the crowd was on its feet and refused to sit down the entire night. Actually, Vives' commanding performance wouldn't let them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | ERNESTO LECHNER
There's a certain naturalness about the way Colombian singer Carlos Vives fuses rock 'n' roll with the traditional sounds of his land that makes his music an irresistible affair. The combination, as Vives demonstrated Saturday, the second of the three nights he was scheduled to perform at the House of Blues, is so well balanced that his material never stops surprising you, even within the same song. A furious electric guitar solo could at any moment give way to a sweetly hot accordion line.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1995 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First it was lambada , then it was bolero , then bachata . Now it is the turn for vallenato , the music that all of a sudden every Latin music fan seems to know . . . and love. Before 1993, vallenato was known only to Colombians--just older Colombians, for that matter--and the music was considered a low-class folk genre for the masses.
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