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Carmen Milano

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NEWS
June 29, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
He drives a 1973 Buick with a rebuilt transmission. He goes at night to a modest home in Tarzana, watches a little television, goes to bed by 9. "Once in a while, I go to the movies; not that often. I have trouble staying awake," Carmen Milano confessed. "Maybe it's because I'm not one of the gang, I don't know. It's not my cup of tea. I'm not from the fast lane, the Bruce Willises, that type of thing. I'm very boring."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Eight men identified as the top leadership of the Los Angeles Mafia were sentenced Monday to prison terms of up to 10 years, concluding a prosecution that authorities say halted the Milano crime family's efforts to gain a new hold on organized crime in Southern California. Peter J. Milano, the alleged boss of the Los Angeles family, was sentenced to six years in prison, and his brother, Carmen, purported underboss of the family, was ordered to serve six months of a two-year prison term.
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NEWS
March 30, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Seven alleged mobsters, including Peter J. Milano, the reputed Mafia boss who led a move to strengthen the Los Angeles crime family's grip on loan-sharking, bookmaking and narcotics, pleaded guilty Tuesday in a case that officials said may have sounded the death knell for organized crime in Southern California. Milano pleaded guilty to conducting a racketeering enterprise that federal authorities have identified as a newly revitalized wing of La Cosa Nostra in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Seven alleged mobsters, including Peter J. Milano, the reputed Mafia boss who led a move to strengthen the Los Angeles crime family's grip on loan-sharking, bookmaking and narcotics, pleaded guilty Tuesday in a case that officials said may have sounded the death knell for organized crime in Southern California. Milano pleaded guilty to conducting a racketeering enterprise that federal authorities have identified as a newly revitalized wing of La Cosa Nostra in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Eight men identified as the top leadership of the Los Angeles Mafia were sentenced Monday to prison terms of up to 10 years, concluding a prosecution that authorities say halted the Milano crime family's efforts to gain a new hold on organized crime in Southern California. Peter J. Milano, the alleged boss of the Los Angeles family, was sentenced to six years in prison, and his brother, Carmen, purported underboss of the family, was ordered to serve six months of a two-year prison term.
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | United Press International
The reputed leader of the Southern California Mafia, two of his top henchmen and four other men today pleaded guilty to racketeering or extortion charges on the first day of their trial in Los Angeles federal court. Peter John Milano, identified by prosecutors as the leader of an organized crime family, pleaded guilty to racketeering. He admitted that he participated in two attempted extortions.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | From Associated Press
Seven organized crime figures were arrested and eight others charged, culminating a four-year investigation of gambling and loan-sharking that "dealt a decapitating blow" to the Mafia in Southern California, authorities said today. Peter John Milano, 52, alleged to be the head of La Cosa Nostra in Southern California, was arrested this morning along with alleged under-boss Carmen Joseph Milano, 58, U.S. Attorney Robert Bonner announced at a press conference.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A Palm Desert man identified by authorities as a longtime organized crime figure entered a conditional guilty plea Monday to charges of selling 83 grams of cocaine to an FBI agent. Robert Ralph D'Agostino, 54, became the first of 15 alleged Mafia leaders and associates to admit to charges in an 18-count indictment targeting what federal prosecutors say is the entire hierarchy of the Los Angeles crime family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The plan had the irresistible lure of easy money and an unexpected added attraction: It was legal. Peter Milano, a San Fernando Valley vending machine company owner who authorities say also heads the Mafia in Los Angeles, sat down with his son-in-law one day in 1985 to talk about the mob's latest moneymaking enterprise, a proposal to set up tourist junkets between San Diego and Las Vegas. The son-in-law, Russell J.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The reputed chief of organized crime in Southern California was one of 15 suspected mobsters indicted Friday in a crackdown that federal officials say has "largely gutted" Cosa Nostra operations here. Peter John Milano, 52, identified as head of the family that controls organized crime in the Southland, and his brother, Carmen Joseph Milano, 58, were named in an 18-count federal racketeering indictment connecting them with a broad range of criminal activities over the last four years.
NEWS
June 29, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
He drives a 1973 Buick with a rebuilt transmission. He goes at night to a modest home in Tarzana, watches a little television, goes to bed by 9. "Once in a while, I go to the movies; not that often. I have trouble staying awake," Carmen Milano confessed. "Maybe it's because I'm not one of the gang, I don't know. It's not my cup of tea. I'm not from the fast lane, the Bruce Willises, that type of thing. I'm very boring."
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