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Carmen Trutanich

OPINION
February 14, 2011
Just don't block traffic Re "Political protesters may face jail time in L.A. " Feb. 11 Protesters have the right to march on sidewalks and public places so long as they do not block traffic or cause a public nuisance. The protesters in your article knew they were doing something against the law. Why are they now alarmed at the consequences? I am personally irritated when protesters block traffic for hours on Wilshire Boulevard. Why can't they get a permit and do it lawfully?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | By Jack Leonard, David Zahniser and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
He far outpaced opponents in fundraising, enjoyed the backing of the political elite and was a battle-tested campaigner considered the favorite in a crowded field of relatively unknown prosecutors vying to become Los Angeles County district attorney. But L.A. City Atty. Carmen Trutanich's polished television ad, dramatic online videos and supportive robocalls from the governor and others were not enough to connect with voters and overcome attacks he faced on the campaign trail. If Wednesday's vote tallies hold, Trutanich would finish third, setting up a historic runoff election between two veteran L.A. County prosecutors — Jackie Lacey, the chief deputy district attorney, and Alan Jackson, a supervisor in the office's major crimes division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2010 | By David Zahniser
Workers have removed five supergraphics from a pair of buildings on Hollywood Boulevard that are at the center of the latest criminal sign case filed by City Atty. Carmen Trutanich. A judge issued arrest warrants Tuesday for four people accused by Trutanich of putting up five illegal signs at 6800 Hollywood Blvd. and 6810-6820 Hollywood Blvd. The city's sign law bans the installation of new supergraphics, or vinyl images draped across the side of a building. Deputy City Atty.
OPINION
February 12, 2011 | Tim Rutten
From the hysterical reaction of two local prosecutors, you'd think Southern California suddenly had become Paris in 1848 ? or, maybe, contemporary Cairo. In Los Angeles, City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, who seems to have formed his notion of prosecutorial discretion during an earlier career as a schoolyard bully, has reversed his office's policy of treating arrests during the course of nonviolent political protests as infractions that could be resolved in informal hearings resulting in fines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Jean Merl and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
After an especially contentious campaign, Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich conceded to challenger Mike Feuer late Tuesday, while attorney Ron Galperin was leading City Councilman Dennis Zine in partial returns for another citywide office, controller. From his jampacked party at a home in Hancock Park, Feuer said he was gratified by the "tremendous outpouring of support" he found as he campaigned in communities across the city. He promised to bring a "new level of connection" between the city attorney's office and L.A.'s neighborhoods.
OPINION
October 8, 2012 | Jim Newton
In this city election cycle, most of the attention so far has been devoted to the big event: the early maneuvering in the mayor's race, as the field takes shape and the leading contenders attempt to define themselves. While that's going on, though, the undercard has been largely overlooked, and there the contest for city attorney pits two of the region's better-known - and quite different - public officials against each other in what promises to be a tough and consequential bout. In one corner is Assemblyman Mike Feuer - earnest, experienced and capable, a wiry middleweight with a solid record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2009 | By Maeve Reston
City Atty. Carmen Trutanich was released Thursday from Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center San Pedro after being admitted Saturday suffering from abdominal pains. He is now resting at home. John Franklin, a spokesman for the city attorney, said that doctors diagnosed Trutanich with upper abdominal problems and that he had undergone a series of tests. Doctors believe his condition is related to stress, diet and exhaustion, officials said. "He's working himself to death," Chief Deputy City Atty.
OPINION
February 22, 2012
City Atty. Carmen Trutanich is a man of his word. OK, perhaps not when it comes to his campaign promise to serve out his full term, but certainly when it involves the city's homeless policies. Last June, his office vowed to appeal a preliminary injunction by a federal court that temporarily barred the city's Bureau of Street Services and police from seizing or destroying the unattended property of homeless people in downtown's skid row neighborhood. This month, he followed through, asking the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn the injunction on the grounds that the city's homeless are in effect using the sidewalks as "their own public storage area.
OPINION
March 20, 2011
The line between art and vandalism seems to be getting a bit thin; such acclaimed talents as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Banksy have gotten big bucks for their works on canvas, but their works on billboards, buildings, culverts and other public surfaces cost property owners big bucks to clean up. In the case of one such street artist, Cristian Gheorghiu, the city of Los Angeles is looking for payback. As Times staff writer Richard Winton chronicled last week, City Atty. Carmen Trutanich has filed suit against Gheorghiu and nine other graffiti artists (none as well-known as Gheorghiu)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
A political feud between Los Angeles city officials has helped sink a proposal to vastly expand the powers of the city attorney by giving him his own grand jury. Legislation by state Sen. Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) appears to have died for the year after failing to win support from a key committee in the Assembly. The panel's approval is necessary by Friday, and the committee is not scheduled to meet again. The measure was proposed by Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich to help him investigate significant misdemeanor cases, but it had been bitterly opposed by some members of the L.A. City Council as an illegal power grab.
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