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May 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Carnegie Hall plans to renovate its Studio Towers and backstage areas -- but the expansion would require doing away with residences that have been used over the years by artists such as Leonard Bernstein. To accommodate its need for new classrooms, rehearsal spaces, practice and large ensemble rooms within its existing footprint, it will need to occupy all the available space in its two Studio Towers, now occupied by longtime tenant-artists, the venerable New York venue said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By James C. Taylor
NEW YORK - Pianist Evgeny Kissin speaks many languages, but to audiences around the world he is best known - and in some circles, revered - for his ability to articulate, with precision, the greatest scores of the classical piano repertoire. Talking with the Russian-born artist on New York's Upper West Side a few days before a sold-out solo recital at Carnegie Hall (the program of Scriabin and Schubert will repeat at Disney Hall on Monday), it becomes immediately clear that Kissin's mind is hard-wired for accuracy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Los Angeles Youth Orchestra has played all over the city, UCLA's Schoenberg Hall and the Skirball Cultural Center included. But it hasn't ventured outside of L.A. Now the orchestra will finally hit the road -- and it's headed straight to Carnegie Hall . “Why settle?” says Artistic Director Russell Steinberg. More than 75 students, ages 8 to 18, will travel to New York for a Feb. 25 concert. The evening is in honor of their late program director and viola coach Eve Cohen, who passed away from cancer last October.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Goodbye, Oscar; hello, Neil. That's what stagehands at the Dolby Theatre might say next month when Neil Young moves into the Hollywood venue (formerly known as the Kodak Theatre) not long after the Academy Awards are handed out there on March 2. The rock veteran announced Thursday that he'll play two shows at the Dolby on March 29 and 30, both solo gigs expected to be like those he played last month at Carnegie Hall in New York, according to Young's representative. CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat Writing about the first of four Carnegie Hall concerts, the New York Times' Nate Chinen said , "... the impression created onstage was tent show troubadour: Mr. Young, in a brimmed hat and a baggy coat, moved deliberately among a trove of instruments, including two battered pianos, a hulking organ, a banjo and more than half a dozen acoustic guitars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
How do you get a stage named after you at Carnegie Hall? Donate. Donate. Donate. Carnegie Hall said Friday that it has named its main stage the Ronald O. Perelman Family Stage in recognition of a new $20-million endowment the financier has set up to support education and artistic programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN
If you have ever been to one of those anniversary parties for a rich and popular old relative, where everybody chips in glowing reminiscences and nostalgic photos for a scrapbook, you know what to expect from "Carnegie Hall at 100: A Place of Dreams." The show is a 60-minute stream of celebrity testimonials. (It airs tonight on KPBS Channel 15 at 9 p.m. and KVCR Channel 24 and KOCE Channel 50 at 10 p.m., and Sunday on KCET Channel 28 at 6:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The call came a few hours before Carnegie Hall's season-opening gala concert: Thomas Quasthoff, one of the stars of the night, had an inflamed vocal chord and couldn't sing. Carnegie managers were still searching for a substitute minutes before Wednesday's final rehearsal for conductor Franz Welser-Most and the Cleveland Symphony. Then someone remembered that German soprano Dorothea Roschmann was in town for her Metropolitan Opera performances of Mozart's "Idomeneo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
It took more than practice to land Jerry Coleman and 41 other Irvine Valley College singers a performance this weekend at Carnegie Hall. It also took some luck. Coleman, a 52-year-old Laguna Niguel insurance agent who has been singing for fun since childhood, decided on a whim to join the college's chorale soon after moving to the area two years ago. A few months after he joined, the group was offered a gig at the famed New York City concert hall. "I had no idea this would happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
When members of Fountain Valley High School's Concert Choir perform in New York City's Carnegie Hall in April, it promises to be a high note of their lives. "It gives our choir the opportunity to showcase our talent . . . to show everybody what we've got," said senior Heath Einstein, a choir member since his freshman year. For classmate Mishel Popovich, singing at the famed concert hall is a dream come true. "One of my life's dreams is being fulfilled," said Popovich, who plans to study opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1991 | MIKE WYMA
The Granada Hills Chorale will play Carnegie Hall this summer, but lovers of choral music won't have to travel far to see a performance. The group, excited about appearing in the landmark auditorium, is sure to be at its best in its annual Spring Concert on Sunday. The show, titled "Prelude to Carnegie Hall," will feature some of the material to be presented in New York. "This isn't just a practice session or a warm-up," said Maryann Mendenhall, director of the chorus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2014 | David Colker
When Elaine Redfield arrived in Fullerton in 1950, it was a culture shock. Mainly because, in her view, there wasn't much culture at all in Orange County. "When I came here, the county was a great wasteland, really, culturally and intellectually," she said in a 1979 Los Angeles Times interview. Redfield, who had visited Carnegie Hall and other famed concert venues while growing up in New York, was an arts lover who became an indefatigable arts activist for her new home region.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
"Vladimir Horowitz: Live at Carnegie Hall" Vladimir Horowitz's technical ease, power, wide color palette, singing tone and musicianship sent other now-legendary pianists, including Rudolf Serkin, Arthur Rubinstein and Claudio Arrau, back to the practice room. Serkin said Horowitz "opened a new world for me," and Rubinstein admitted in his autobiography to feeling jealous after hearing Horowitz's near note-perfect playing. Arrau's own mother turned to him after a Horowitz recital and said, "He plays better than you. " Most baby boomers never got to hear that Horowitz, when his technique was unsurpassed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By David Ng
"Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley," the HBO documentary that premiered this week, follows the life of Moms Mabley, the pioneering black comedian who rose to fame for her folksy, sometimes off-color humor. In chronicling her career, the documentary also shines a light on the chitlin' circuit -- the informal collection of live-performance venues where black entertainers could find work during segregation. The chitlin' circuit -- named after chitterlings, the soul-food staple of cooked pig intestines -- was a safe haven for black performers of all genres, allowing them to work at a time when many venues refused to employ people of color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013
Clarence 'Ace' Parker Oldest living Football Hall of Fame member Clarence "Ace" Parker, 101, a star of New York City football in the 1940s who was the oldest member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, died Wednesday, the Canton, Ohio-based Hall of Fame announced. He had been hospitalized with a pulmonary condition since late last month, the Virginian-Pilot newspaper reported. Born May 17, 1912, in Portsmouth, Va., Parker was an all-around athlete who played football, basketball and baseball at Duke University, earning All-America honors as a tailback in football.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
It was said to have been a disastrous seven days for classical music in America. "Hell week" is what Russell Platt called it in the New Yorker last week. New York City Opera declared bankruptcy and shut down. Minnesota Orchestra's music director Osmo Vänskä resigned in frustration over a contract dispute that forced management to cancel all of last season and, still unresolved, resulted in the cancellation of a high-profile tour to Carnegie Hall next month. Speaking of Carnegie, the country's most famous hall canceled its opening night gala last week because of a strike by the stagehands.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By David Ng
Carnegie Hall's opening night gala -- an annual highlight of the New York cultural calendar -- has been canceled at the last minute because of a strike by the organization's stagehands. The Wednesday evening concert was to feature the Philadelphia Orchestra led by conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin, with appearances by violinist Joshua Bell and jazz musician Esperanza Spalding. The labor strike stems from a disagreement over stagehands' jurisdiction over Carnegie Hall's education wing, which is scheduled to open next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | YUNG KIM
Joslyn Sinclair sat in a circle of friends giggling like an average 16-year-old, the way she does every Tuesday at Lake Forest Community Church. She loves Leonardo DiCaprio, the poetry of Robert Shaw and singing with the Southern California Children's Chorus. "Singing allows me to release a lot of emotion, to express myself," said Joslyn, of Newport Beach. "I feel lucky to have the talent to do this."
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | LEO SMITH
Ventura County's barbershop-style Channelaire Chorus is gearing up for a performance at Carnegie Hall in New York May 8. The 83-member group has been invited to perform under the direction of Peter Tiboris, music director for the Manhattan Philharmonic. Judy Ashmore, the group's musical director, said nobody seems to be particularly anxious. "We've done enough performances not to be," she said. "It's more excitement than nervousness." But one thing does worry Ashmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Los Angeles Youth Orchestra has played all over the city, UCLA's Schoenberg Hall and the Skirball Cultural Center included. But it hasn't ventured outside of L.A. Now the orchestra will finally hit the road -- and it's headed straight to Carnegie Hall . “Why settle?” says Artistic Director Russell Steinberg. More than 75 students, ages 8 to 18, will travel to New York for a Feb. 25 concert. The evening is in honor of their late program director and viola coach Eve Cohen, who passed away from cancer last October.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By David Ng
Osvaldo Golijov is one of the most in-demand composers working today, with commissions from major orchestras around the world. But the past few years have been difficult for the Argentine composer: He has missed deadlines for new pieces and was accused earlier this year of plagiarism. On Thursday, Golijov whiffed again with the announcement that his new violin concerto -- already delayed -- will not be ready for its scheduled performances in January. The piece had been scheduled to be performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, with violinist Leonidas Kavakos, in concerts in Philadelphia and Carnegie Hall.
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