Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCarnegie Institution
IN THE NEWS

Carnegie Institution

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
June 24, 2002
I was at first astounded that Pennsylvania Republican Rep. John E. Peterson proposed giving 110 acres of national forest land surrounding Mt. Wilson to a private group ("Eastern Lawmaker Seeks Land Giveaway--in L.A.," June 21). Upon discovering the property would be developed by the Mt. Wilson Institute for use by the Carnegie Institution, I took heart. The juxtaposition of a bunch of Luddites who are skeptical of scientifically validated changes in Earth's climate encamped at the foot of an observatory considered the birthplace of modern astronomy is "waaaay" Southern California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2012 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roy J. Britten, a Caltech biologist who discovered that the mammalian genome includes large quantities of repetitive DNA sequences that do not serve as blueprints for genes, has died. He was 92. Britten, who had pancreatic cancer, died Jan. 21 at his home in Costa Mesa, Caltech announced. Britten and molecular biologist Eric Davidson, a Caltech colleague, also played a key role in the development of the field of evolutionary developmental biology, which demonstrated that most of the differences between species arise from changes in how similar genes are regulated, rather than from mutations in the genes themselves.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2012 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roy J. Britten, a Caltech biologist who discovered that the mammalian genome includes large quantities of repetitive DNA sequences that do not serve as blueprints for genes, has died. He was 92. Britten, who had pancreatic cancer, died Jan. 21 at his home in Costa Mesa, Caltech announced. Britten and molecular biologist Eric Davidson, a Caltech colleague, also played a key role in the development of the field of evolutionary developmental biology, which demonstrated that most of the differences between species arise from changes in how similar genes are regulated, rather than from mutations in the genes themselves.
OPINION
June 24, 2002
I was at first astounded that Pennsylvania Republican Rep. John E. Peterson proposed giving 110 acres of national forest land surrounding Mt. Wilson to a private group ("Eastern Lawmaker Seeks Land Giveaway--in L.A.," June 21). Upon discovering the property would be developed by the Mt. Wilson Institute for use by the Carnegie Institution, I took heart. The juxtaposition of a bunch of Luddites who are skeptical of scientifically validated changes in Earth's climate encamped at the foot of an observatory considered the birthplace of modern astronomy is "waaaay" Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Officials announced plans Tuesday to reopen the Mt. Wilson Observatory, one of the nation's most historic astronomical facilities, pending adequate funding by a grass-roots organization that sprang up after the Carnegie Institution put the observatory's 100-inch telescope in mothballs two years ago. The nonprofit Mt. Wilson Institute said it plans to expand public use of the facility and reopen the famed Hooker telescope, which dominated the world of astronomy for more than three decades.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | JILL LAI, United Press International
Every year self-help books tumble off the presses, some to see a brief season as a best-seller, some to disappear without a trace. But the daddy of them all, Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People," lives on 50 years after it first appeared. The book has sold 16 million copies to date. In 1985, American Heritage Magazine listed it as one of 10 books that have shaped the American character, alongside such books as Henry David Thoreau's "Walden."
SCIENCE
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A traveler walking along the eastern bank of Hudson Bay in northern Quebec can stand on the oldest bedrock known on Earth. This section of the planet's crust may be as much as 4.28 billion years old, researchers Jonathan O'Neil of McGill University and Richard Carlson of the Carnegie Institution reported Friday in the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1985
The 100-inch telescope on Mt. Wilson above Pasadena was once one of the world's great astronomical instruments. Edwin Hubble used it in the 1920s to make two fundamental discoveries: that the universe is expanding, and that it contains billions of other galaxies just like ours. But light pollution from Los Angeles seriously degraded the telescope's ability to peer into deep space.Last year the Carnegie Institution of Washington, which owns and runs the Mt.
SCIENCE
May 7, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Astronomers have discovered a dozen new moons circling Saturn -- all but one orbiting in a direction opposite of the planet's spin, suggesting the moons formed elsewhere in the solar system and were captured by the planet's gravitational field. The 12 new moons, which are 1.86 miles to 4.35 miles wide, were announced this week by Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and David Jewitt of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy.
SCIENCE
February 28, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Artificial diamonds made from gas turned out surprisingly hard -- harder even than natural diamonds, U.S. researchers said Wednesday. Writing in the online issue of Physica Status Solidi, a team at the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory in Washington said they grew the crystals using a process called high-growth rate chemical vapor deposition, in which hydrogen gas and methane are bombarded with charged particles in a chamber.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | JILL LAI, United Press International
Every year self-help books tumble off the presses, some to see a brief season as a best-seller, some to disappear without a trace. But the daddy of them all, Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People," lives on 50 years after it first appeared. The book has sold 16 million copies to date. In 1985, American Heritage Magazine listed it as one of 10 books that have shaped the American character, alongside such books as Henry David Thoreau's "Walden."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Officials announced plans Tuesday to reopen the Mt. Wilson Observatory, one of the nation's most historic astronomical facilities, pending adequate funding by a grass-roots organization that sprang up after the Carnegie Institution put the observatory's 100-inch telescope in mothballs two years ago. The nonprofit Mt. Wilson Institute said it plans to expand public use of the facility and reopen the famed Hooker telescope, which dominated the world of astronomy for more than three decades.
NEWS
October 24, 1993
Randolph Hafstad, 89, a physicist who helped develop nuclear power. After German scientists succeeded in splitting atomic nuclei in the late 1930s, Hafstad and two colleagues accomplished the same feat in 1939 at the Carnegie Institution of Technology in Washington. It was the first step toward the production and use of the atomic bomb in 1945. In 1948, Hafstad was appointed the first director of reactor development for the Atomic Energy Commission.
NEWS
July 20, 1996
Here is a complete list of the 230 people, including four cockpit crew members and 14 flight attendants, aboard TWA Flight 800: -A- Aikens-Bellamy, Sandra, 49, of St. Albans, N.Y., off-duty TWA employee Aikey, Jessica, 17, of Montoursville, Pa., student Alex, Christian Alexander, Matthew, 20, of Florence, S.C., Wake Forest University student at Winston-Salem, N.C. , traveling to Dijon, France, to study Allen, Ashton, 15, of Marietta, Ga. Allen, Lamar, of Marietta, Ga.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|