Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCarnegie Mellon University
IN THE NEWS

Carnegie Mellon University

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
May 31, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are teaching computers how to read minds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging on nine subjects, distinct brain patterns associated with 58 different concrete nouns, such as animals, body parts, clothing, vehicles and insects, were identified, the team reported Friday in the journal Science. They then tested the computer model with two new words, asking it to choose which one the subjects were thinking. The computer was correct 77% of the time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. For more than 20 years at UC Irvine, Dudley Knight devised innovative and sometimes controversial ways of teaching acting students to speak clearly while lending their characters authentic, unforced accents and dialects. Knight, who had retired 10 years ago to Pennsylvania, returned to the campus last month to begin rehearsing his role as King Lear in an outdoor summer festival production of the Shakespeare tragedy.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Worshipers wearing a rainbow of saris, robes and yarmulkes filed into a hall at Carnegie Mellon University, clapping and singing in praise of the world's religions. As drums beat, the 225 participants from six continents celebrated their own faiths and reached out to other believers in the signing of the United Religions Initiative Charter calling for religious cooperation. It includes prohibitions on aggressive recruitment.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are teaching computers how to read minds. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging on nine subjects, distinct brain patterns associated with 58 different concrete nouns, such as animals, body parts, clothing, vehicles and insects, were identified, the team reported Friday in the journal Science. They then tested the computer model with two new words, asking it to choose which one the subjects were thinking. The computer was correct 77% of the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2002 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask botanists why they draw plants instead of photographing them and they'll tell you that you can't understand how a plant works until you draw it. Form follows function. Ask science publishers why they so often prefer illustrations to photographs and they'll say the artist can subtly emphasize traits that are critical to identifying a plant.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After sending autonomous machines to explore the surface of Mars, engineers at Jet Propulsion Laboratory and around the country are building a robot to venture into equally inhospitable territory--the interior of Chernobyl's exploded nuclear reactor. The radiation level inside the reactor that melted down 12 years ago this month is so high that it would take only seconds to absorb more radiation than it is safe to be exposed to over an entire year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. For more than 20 years at UC Irvine, Dudley Knight devised innovative and sometimes controversial ways of teaching acting students to speak clearly while lending their characters authentic, unforced accents and dialects. Knight, who had retired 10 years ago to Pennsylvania, returned to the campus last month to begin rehearsing his role as King Lear in an outdoor summer festival production of the Shakespeare tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Caroline McWilliams, an actress and director best known to television audiences for her work on the series "Benson" and "Soap," has died. She was 64. McWilliams died Feb. 11 at her home in Los Angeles from complications of multiple myeloma, her family said. Caroline Margaret McWilliams was born April 4, 1945, in Seattle but grew up in Barrington, R.I. She graduated in 1966 with a bachelor's degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her first break on television was on "Guiding Light," a longtime CBS soap opera in which she appeared for several years beginning in 1969.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Allen Newell, a pioneer of artificial intelligence and cognitive science, died Sunday of cancer. He was 65. Newell was a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University for about 30 years. His idea that computers could be programmed to solve the same problems as humans helped establish the field of artificial intelligence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2002 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask botanists why they draw plants instead of photographing them and they'll tell you that you can't understand how a plant works until you draw it. Form follows function. Ask science publishers why they so often prefer illustrations to photographs and they'll say the artist can subtly emphasize traits that are critical to identifying a plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Worshipers wearing a rainbow of saris, robes and yarmulkes filed into a hall at Carnegie Mellon University, clapping and singing in praise of the world's religions. As drums beat, the 225 participants from six continents celebrated their own faiths and reached out to other believers in the signing of the United Religions Initiative Charter calling for religious cooperation. It includes prohibitions on aggressive recruitment.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After sending autonomous machines to explore the surface of Mars, engineers at Jet Propulsion Laboratory and around the country are building a robot to venture into equally inhospitable territory--the interior of Chernobyl's exploded nuclear reactor. The radiation level inside the reactor that melted down 12 years ago this month is so high that it would take only seconds to absorb more radiation than it is safe to be exposed to over an entire year.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A new computer virus can e-mail documents without warning, a potential security breach that should worry businesses and governments, an expert at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh said. The "Melissa macro" spreads via infected e-mail and attacks computers loaded with Microsoft's Word 97 or Word 2000 programs, according to the Computer Emergency Response Team, Carnegie Mellon's Department of Defense-funded computer security team.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2002 | Associated Press
Much of the Internet's network devices--from desktop computers to traffic management systems-- have a security flaw that could allow hackers to shut them down or gain control of the devices, a government-funded research group warned. The problem is most serious for Internet service providers, which use systems called routers to manage the flow of messages across computer networks and the Internet, the group said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|