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Carnival Cruise Lines

TRAVEL
October 2, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
THIS season's hurricanes have shattered countless travel plans, raising questions about what happens to the consumer who gets caught in the storm. When flights, cruises and trains, and hotel and rental car reservations are canceled or shifted en masse, customers get their money back -- or not. They are happy with their re-accommodation -- or not. The outcomes are dictated, of course, by each travel supplier's policy. But they also depend on the pluck, patience and creativity of their customers.
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NATIONAL
September 24, 2005 | Alan C. Miller, Ken Silverstein and John Hendren, Times Staff Writers
When Carnival Cruise Lines agreed to lease three ships to the government for Hurricane Katrina evacuees, the company president portrayed it as an act of compassion to "provide desperately needed housing for thousands of individuals." Now two lawmakers are questioning the hastily negotiated deal, which could give the company as much as $236 million. Rep. Henry A.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
PASSENGER ships were rerouted, and the world's largest cruise line chartered three of its vessels to the federal government after Hurricane Katrina devastated coastal areas in three states. The parent company of another cruise line reached out to hundreds of displaced employees. At the Travel section's deadline Tuesday, the Port of New Orleans, although accepting relief shipments, remained closed to commercial cargo and passenger traffic. It was not clear when it would reopen.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Three Carnival Cruise Lines ships have been pressed into service by the government to provide shelter for as many as 7,000 hurricane victims. The Ecstasy, the Sensation and the Holiday will be pulled from regular use Monday at the request of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The cost of the charters was not disclosed.
TRAVEL
May 8, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
The cruise industry grows smaller all the time. Although travel professionals know the number of cruise lines is shrinking, the news surprises many travelers. Three companies now control the majority of cruise ships that offer midlevel prices: Carnival Corp., Royal Caribbean International and Norwegian Cruise Lines. Carnival Corp.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Cruising the Continent? You'll have company. "European cruising this year is about as hot as I've ever seen it," said Anne Campbell, co-owner of vwww.cruisemates.com, an online cruise magazine. "I've never seen so many ships there." It's a case of deferred dreams colliding with the cruel reality of the deteriorating U.S. dollar, industry insiders say. Many Americans are eager to catch up on the foreign travel they've bypassed since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the Iraq war.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
A 54-year-old passenger vanished as a ship returned from a five-day cruise to the Bahamas, and a daylong ocean search turned up no sign of him Friday. Glen Sheridan of Williamsburg, Va., was reported missing by his wife Thursday, after the Carnival Cruise Lines ship Celebration docked in Jacksonville. The ship's electronic exit and entry program showed he had not left the vessel after the arrival, and a crew search of the boat came up empty, Carnival said.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Carnival Cruise Lines ship returned to Galveston from a five-day cruise to Mexico with more than 300 people sick with a gastrointestinal illness. Carnival said preliminary tests showed the outbreak might have been caused by a norovirus. The Celebration left Galveston on Monday. On Wednesday, Carnival contacted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to report an unusual number of ill passengers.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2003 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Apparently it wasn't paradise for everyone. Carnival Cruise Lines is snuffing out its own smoking ban on the Paradise, touted as the world's first smoke-free ocean liner when it hit the water five years ago. Workers who built the ship weren't allowed to light up; passengers faced $250 fines and were asked to disembark at the next port just for taking cigarettes aboard.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2003 | Judi Dash, Special to The Times
Craving a vacation at sea but unwilling to fly to a port, Jay and Shelly Schwartz hopped a taxi from their home in Maryland and within an hour were boarding the Galaxy in Baltimore, Celebrity Cruises' new departure point for 10- and 11-night Caribbean sailings. On that same ship were Carol and Bruce Janniff of Seattle. For years they had wanted to tour Washington, D.C., and Baltimore's revitalized Inner Harbor, but they also hankered for a do-nothing cruise.
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