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Carol Muske Dukes

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April 15, 2012
Panel: California Literature: The Big Picture Participants: Ralph Lewin, Tom Lutz, Carol Muske-Dukes, moderator Oscar Villalon When: 10:30 a.m. Saturday Where: Seeley G. Mudd building on the USC campus * Carol Muske-Dukes reads from "Twin Cities" When: 11:30 a.m. Sunday Where: Poetry stage on the USC campus For more information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
President Obama's choice of the relatively unknown Cuban American poet Richard Blanco to read at his inauguration later this month caught many people in poetry circles by surprise. Blanco, 44, will be the first Latino poet, and the first openly gay man given the honor of reading at a presidential inauguration. And his choice is a reflection of the great shifts in American poetry circles and U.S. culture at large. "I think it's an inspired choice," said David St. John, a poet and professor at USC. Though Blanco is well-known in poetry circles for his award-winning first collection of poetry and recently published his third book, "Looking for the Gulf Motel," he's "not an establishment poet," as former California poet laureate Carol Muske-Dukes put it. "It's a choice that's not only important for the gay and lesbian and Latino communities," St. John said, "but also for poets who work to give voice to people outside the mainstream of popular culture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Associated Press
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday appointed a USC English professor and author as California's next poet laureate. Carol Muske-Dukes founded the school's graduate program in literature and creative writing. She has written seven books of poetry, four novels and two essay collections. Her most recent work, "Sparrow," was a National Book Award finalist. She also founded and taught in a creative-writing program at a women's prison on Rikers Island in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012
Panel: California Literature: The Big Picture Participants: Ralph Lewin, Tom Lutz, Carol Muske-Dukes, moderator Oscar Villalon When: 10:30 a.m. Saturday Where: Seeley G. Mudd building on the USC campus * Carol Muske-Dukes reads from "Twin Cities" When: 11:30 a.m. Sunday Where: Poetry stage on the USC campus For more information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Prize-winning Los Angeles poet Carol Muske Dukes amused readers four years ago with her witty first novel, "Dear Digby." That book featured a letters editor at a feminist magazine that bore a close resemblance to Ms., and the story bounced back and forth between the string of wacko letters she published--and answered hilariously--and her demanding personal life, strained by a rocky marriage. Now Dukes is back with a riveting new novel that probes much of the same material.
BOOKS
May 21, 1989 | Linsey Abrams, Abrams is the author of two novels, "Charting by the Stars" and "Double Vision."
"Dear Digby," the poet Carol Muske-Dukes' first novel, makes its most obvious literary reference to Nathanael West's "Miss Lonelyhearts." The impossible predicament of he, or in this case she, who must answer in print the painful cries de coeur of strangers is one of enduring interest. It's a story with a built-in irony: that mortals can petition only other mortals to redress life's wrongs. But the greater irony lies in the predicament of the respondent, who by definition is inadequate to the task.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012 | By Carol Muske-Dukes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a freezing night in March 1978 - and the small, determined woman climbing next to me up the icy incline to the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for women leaned on a cane. I wanted to take her arm, but because she was famously fiercely independent, I hesitated. Later, I thought that I was right to hold back: Adrienne Rich was that kind of standard-bearer, accustomed to her own "climb," accustomed to a righteous loneliness in her ascent. In 1978, Adrienne Rich was not an old woman, but the degenerative arthritis that eventually crippled her had already begun to compromise her free movement - hence the cane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010
MOVIES Open Projector Night The Sklar Brothers host an evening of short films (less than 10 minutes each) by novice auteurs in a wide range of genres and formats. Per the museum, filmmakers should think "showdown" rather than "showcase." Submissions accepted at 7 p.m.; screenings at 7:30 p.m. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Free. (310) 443-7000. hammer.ucla.edu. JAZZ Terence Blanchard The jazz composer scored many of Spike Lee's best films, but the hard bop artist first cut his teeth as a player with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra and Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | Nick Owchar
One often hears writers complain about book tours. Traveling constantly, facing small crowds, having the dream of the next book interrupted by the need to promote this one -- it's all too much. I'd expected to find Carol Muske-Dukes, back in L.A. last week to promote her novel "Channeling Mark Twain," just as weary about book touring as everyone else. Instead, she felt energized by the opportunity to discuss with live audiences a book that has eluded her for 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
President Obama's choice of the relatively unknown Cuban American poet Richard Blanco to read at his inauguration later this month caught many people in poetry circles by surprise. Blanco, 44, will be the first Latino poet, and the first openly gay man given the honor of reading at a presidential inauguration. And his choice is a reflection of the great shifts in American poetry circles and U.S. culture at large. "I think it's an inspired choice," said David St. John, a poet and professor at USC. Though Blanco is well-known in poetry circles for his award-winning first collection of poetry and recently published his third book, "Looking for the Gulf Motel," he's "not an establishment poet," as former California poet laureate Carol Muske-Dukes put it. "It's a choice that's not only important for the gay and lesbian and Latino communities," St. John said, "but also for poets who work to give voice to people outside the mainstream of popular culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012 | By Carol Muske-Dukes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a freezing night in March 1978 - and the small, determined woman climbing next to me up the icy incline to the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for women leaned on a cane. I wanted to take her arm, but because she was famously fiercely independent, I hesitated. Later, I thought that I was right to hold back: Adrienne Rich was that kind of standard-bearer, accustomed to her own "climb," accustomed to a righteous loneliness in her ascent. In 1978, Adrienne Rich was not an old woman, but the degenerative arthritis that eventually crippled her had already begun to compromise her free movement - hence the cane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010
MOVIES Open Projector Night The Sklar Brothers host an evening of short films (less than 10 minutes each) by novice auteurs in a wide range of genres and formats. Per the museum, filmmakers should think "showdown" rather than "showcase." Submissions accepted at 7 p.m.; screenings at 7:30 p.m. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Free. (310) 443-7000. hammer.ucla.edu. JAZZ Terence Blanchard The jazz composer scored many of Spike Lee's best films, but the hard bop artist first cut his teeth as a player with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra and Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Associated Press
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday appointed a USC English professor and author as California's next poet laureate. Carol Muske-Dukes founded the school's graduate program in literature and creative writing. She has written seven books of poetry, four novels and two essay collections. Her most recent work, "Sparrow," was a National Book Award finalist. She also founded and taught in a creative-writing program at a women's prison on Rikers Island in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | Nick Owchar
One often hears writers complain about book tours. Traveling constantly, facing small crowds, having the dream of the next book interrupted by the need to promote this one -- it's all too much. I'd expected to find Carol Muske-Dukes, back in L.A. last week to promote her novel "Channeling Mark Twain," just as weary about book touring as everyone else. Instead, she felt energized by the opportunity to discuss with live audiences a book that has eluded her for 20 years.
BOOKS
July 1, 2007 | Wendy Smith, Wendy Smith is a New York-based critic and the author of "Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940."
WHAT good is art? Does it make any real difference in people's lives? For the conflicted heroine of Carol Muske-Dukes' rueful yet affirmative new novel, these questions come attached to uncomfortable specifics. Holly Mattox teaches a poetry workshop at the Women's House of Detention on Rikers Island. What use is this rarefied art to prostitutes, drug addicts and murderers? How can poetry possibly matter in the face of their suffering and their crimes?
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Three Los Angeles writers, two of whom teach at USC, are among the 20 finalists for the National Book Awards. The finalists were named Wednesday in New York by the National Book Foundation, which recognizes the best literary and nonfiction work by Americans each year. Nominees include T.C. Boyle, for his novel "Drop City" (Viking/Penguin Group), and Carol Muske-Dukes, for her book of poems "Sparrow" (Random House), both of whom are creative writing professors at USC.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | PENELOPE MOFFET, Moffet is a Los Angeles writer
Willis Jane Digby wears a tuxedo and rabbit ears to get into the mood for reading the letters-to-the-editor at SIS magazine, "a bimonthly cross between a feminist Time and a liberated Ladies' Home Journal." Digby wears her ears for a newspaper photographer in poet Carol Muske-Dukes' wacky first novel, "Dear Digby," newly out from Viking. But her creator isn't about to follow suit.
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an era in which the popular view--bred from poetry slams and other populist movements--holds that poetry is the collision of rhyme and fury, W.S. Merwin stands apart. To him, poetry is a discipline, and the art of wrestling words into meaning and taming your emotions is the work of a lifetime, not a diversion.
BOOKS
December 15, 2002 | Thea Klapwald, Thea Klapwald has written for the (London) Times Literary Supplement and other publications, and is working on a novel about expatriates living in Hong Kong.
The perennial question, "What does it mean to be a Los Angeles writer?" is one of the many that Carol Muske-Dukes explores in her recent collection of essays, "Married to the Icepick Killer: A Poet in Hollywood." Perhaps, when she describes herself as an "internationally unknown author," she is taking a stab at answering it. Of course, this is an understatement.
BOOKS
August 12, 2001 | REGINA MARLER, Regina Marler is the author of "Bloomsbury Pie: The Making of the Bloomsbury Boom."
In Greek and Roman myth, rivers serve as the borders between this world and the next. The newly dead are ferried across the River Styx, while purified souls on their way back to Earth line up to drink from Lethe, the river of forgetfulness. Carol Muske-Dukes' third novel, "Life After Death," is set in these watery passageways between two states of being, her dead characters not really dead, her living characters backward-looking, trapped by loss and grief.
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