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Carole Ann Klonarides

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July 4, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Most people refuse to acknowledge video as an art form and I think the relationship we have with television has a lot to do with that," observes Carole Ann Klonarides, media arts curator at the Long Beach Museum of Art. "We grow up thinking of TV as a cross between a piece of furniture and an appliance--we certainly don't consider it a vehicle for art.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Video art is notoriously hard to show in art galleries. It can hog a lot of space, its sound can spill over into other rooms, and its equipment can be cumbersome (though lighter and cheaper with every year). And that's not considering challenging content, like Brazilian artist Tunga's recent video of a bizarre, alchemy-fueled sexual encounter that makes David Lynch movies seem sweet and straightforward by comparison. So when gallery owner Christopher Grimes had the idea of doing a broad sampling of international video art in his space in Santa Monica, he wanted to make the format, if not the content itself, more accessible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Video art is notoriously hard to show in art galleries. It can hog a lot of space, its sound can spill over into other rooms, and its equipment can be cumbersome (though lighter and cheaper with every year). And that's not considering challenging content, like Brazilian artist Tunga's recent video of a bizarre, alchemy-fueled sexual encounter that makes David Lynch movies seem sweet and straightforward by comparison. So when gallery owner Christopher Grimes had the idea of doing a broad sampling of international video art in his space in Santa Monica, he wanted to make the format, if not the content itself, more accessible.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Most people refuse to acknowledge video as an art form and I think the relationship we have with television has a lot to do with that," observes Carole Ann Klonarides, media arts curator at the Long Beach Museum of Art. "We grow up thinking of TV as a cross between a piece of furniture and an appliance--we certainly don't consider it a vehicle for art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Nam June Paik and Allan Kaprow have not been forgotten. Two Southern California institutions will celebrate the artists' lives and legacies this week at multimedia memorial tributes. Paik, a pioneering video and performance artist who died in January at 73, will be honored with an evening of remembrances, performances and video works at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2000 | ROELLA HSIEH LOUIE
David Pagel's May 3 review of the "COLA 2000" exhibition ("Not-So-Striking Resemblances Mark 'COLA 2000' ") does disservice to the artists and to the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department Grants Program, one of the few remaining government grants-making programs in the country that continues to give grants directly to individual artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By David Ng
Norman Yonemoto, a Los Angeles artist who along with his younger brother, Bruce, created innovative video installations that often explored mass media, Hollywood and other forms of pop culture, has died. He was 67. Yonemoto died Friday at his home in Venice. He had been in ill health since suffering a number of strokes, the last of which was in October, said Carole Ann Klonarides, a family representative. Collaborating with his brother for nearly four decades, Yonemoto created video artwork that often appropriated the visual vernacular of Hollywood movies, television and advertising to challenge the viewer's assumptions about the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Eight Million Stories in the Naked City," an exhibition of narrative works, christens the new year at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Jan. 9 to Feb. 8. The exhibition focuses on photography by Lisa Bloomfield, Douglas Huebler and Barbara Kruger, drawings by Anetta Kapon and an installation by Linda Nishio. Curator Elaine Wintman selected the artists. Meanwhile, LACE's show of experimental video works, titled "Video and Language: Video as Language," continues.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
A special "Artists' Toy Factory" is being set up this weekend at 830 N. La Brea Ave., the space previously occupied by Richard/Bennett Gallery (which has moved to Santa Monica). Run by Parker/Zanic Gallery, the space will be set up like a Santa's toy factory, in which 40 to 50 artists will work as the elves, taking broken toys and turning them into art objects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Demonic little girls are particularly delicious--especially for grown women who have long since learned to rein in their demons. Clad in maniacally frilly white dresses (just the thing to cover up the tattoos on their smooth tummies), standard-issue Mary Janes and glasses that resemble those sported by the artist, their hair frizzed Don King-style, their lips pursed in concentration, and their fists clenched with anger, Kim Dingle's little girls vent their pint-sized ids while they still can.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001
8pm Pop Music San Diego bluegrass trio Nickel Creek shows the effect of coming of age under the influence of innovative instrumentalist such as Bela Fleck and Edgar Meyer. The group knows the importance of such standard-bearers as Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers, but they also have a willingness, and the technique, to push the music forward with astonishing musical prowess. * Nickel Creek, Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faye Ray, one of the Weimaraners made famous by artist William Wegman, heads a doggy baseball team, clown great Bill Irwin turns into a discomaniac, New York performance artist Alien Comic celebrates lunar lunacy and filmmaker Shu Lea Cheang uses doing laundry as a metaphor for the difficulties of racial assimilation in the United States. This is child's play? Don't think MTV, think art .
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