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Carole Lombard

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HOME & GARDEN
March 11, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A house in the Sunset Strip area that actress Carole Lombard lived in during the 1930s has come on the market, for sale at $1,595,000 or for one-year lease at $6,500 a month. The French Regency-style home is set behind gates. It has an art studio, a music-media room, four bedrooms and three bathrooms in nearly 3,000 square feet of living space with original fixtures. A spiral staircase off the master suite leads to a loft. The separate guesthouse includes a kitchenette. Lombard, who died in 1942 at 33, was married to leading men William Powell and Clark Gable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Bob Hope led the pack of popular performers who entertained the troops during World War II. John Wayne and other actors fought the war in feature films, and other Hollywood favorites tirelessly toured the country on war bond drives. In fact, beloved actress Carole Lombard died in early 1942 in a plane crash returning from a war bond drive. But there were numerous established stars, directors, producers and workers in other branches of the film industry who put their careers on hold to serve the country during WWII.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The screwball comedian--Carole Lombard--and the maverick film director--Orson Welles--had little in common. Except the fascination of Michael Druxman. Playwright Druxman has written separate plays about the two Hollywood legends, which highlight the upcoming fall season of theater in the San Fernando Valley. "Lombard" will open Oct. 24 at the Center Stage Theatre in Woodland Hills; "Orson Welles" begins at the same location in early November. "I've always enjoyed this concept," said Druxman, 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows (or should) Carole Lombard in "To Be or Not to Be," but what did she do before? Similarly, what did "Mildred Pierce's" Joan Crawford do in the years after? Two new DVD sets from the TCM Vault Collection answer those questions. "Carole Lombard in the Thirties" presents three of the comedies in which the actress had smaller roles: "Brief Moment," "Lady by Choice" and "No More Orchids. " Similarly, "Joan Crawford in the Fifties" presents four of the juicy melodramas she starred in: "Queen Bee," "Harriet Craig," "The Story of Esther Costello" and "Autumn Leaves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | DADE HAYES
The years that movie stars Clark Gable and Carole Lombard spent in the San Fernando Valley were some of their happiest--and for Gable, their most challenging. The pair got married shortly after Gable's epic turn as Rhett Butler in "Gone With the Wind" in 1939, during Lombard's run of uproarious screwball comedies typified by Howard Hawks' "Twentieth Century" in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992
"Lombard," Michael B. Druxman's one-woman play, with Taylor Leigh as actress Carole Lombard, has reopened for an indefinite run at the Charles E. Conrad Studio in Burbank. Information: (818) 569-4904.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Bob Hope led the pack of popular performers who entertained the troops during World War II. John Wayne and other actors fought the war in feature films, and other Hollywood favorites tirelessly toured the country on war bond drives. In fact, beloved actress Carole Lombard died in early 1942 in a plane crash returning from a war bond drive. But there were numerous established stars, directors, producers and workers in other branches of the film industry who put their careers on hold to serve the country during WWII.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 1987
'It looks as if Hollywood brides keep the bouquets and throw away the grooms.' --Groucho Marx Celebrities have a penchant for marrying one another's exes. Call it musical spouses: Mary Pickford to Douglas Fairbanks Sr. Douglas Fairbanks Sr.
HOME & GARDEN
March 16, 2006 | Bettijane Levine
Fans of old Hollywood and old houses get twin delights in this book, which chronicles some of the great residential architecture of early 20th century Los Angeles -- including Streamline Moderne and Beaux Arts -- along with lore about those who built and lived in the houses, and those who have recently restored them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Like James Dean, Jean Harlow and Marilyn Monroe, actress Carole Lombard is forever frozen in time because of her tragic death at a young age -- like them, she never grew old in front of the camera. Lombard, one of the Hollywood's best-loved stars of the 1930s and early '40s, died in 1942 at age 33 in a plane crash. She seemed to have everything. The lithe blond was glamorous, beautiful, smart as a whip and moved with ease from comedies to dramas on the silver screen.
HOME & GARDEN
March 11, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A house in the Sunset Strip area that actress Carole Lombard lived in during the 1930s has come on the market, for sale at $1,595,000 or for one-year lease at $6,500 a month. The French Regency-style home is set behind gates. It has an art studio, a music-media room, four bedrooms and three bathrooms in nearly 3,000 square feet of living space with original fixtures. A spiral staircase off the master suite leads to a loft. The separate guesthouse includes a kitchenette. Lombard, who died in 1942 at 33, was married to leading men William Powell and Clark Gable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2007 | Angie Green, Times Staff Writer
At the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue in Hollywood, tourists are drawn to the Kodak Theatre and Grauman's Chinese Theatre. But off the beaten track is one of the few historic buildings left in an area full of high-rises and strip malls. The former Hollywood School for Girls, which opened in 1908 and educated famous Hollywood actresses, still stands near the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and North La Brea Avenue.
HOME & GARDEN
March 16, 2006 | Bettijane Levine
Fans of old Hollywood and old houses get twin delights in this book, which chronicles some of the great residential architecture of early 20th century Los Angeles -- including Streamline Moderne and Beaux Arts -- along with lore about those who built and lived in the houses, and those who have recently restored them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Like James Dean, Jean Harlow and Marilyn Monroe, actress Carole Lombard is forever frozen in time because of her tragic death at a young age -- like them, she never grew old in front of the camera. Lombard, one of the Hollywood's best-loved stars of the 1930s and early '40s, died in 1942 at age 33 in a plane crash. She seemed to have everything. The lithe blond was glamorous, beautiful, smart as a whip and moved with ease from comedies to dramas on the silver screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | DADE HAYES
The years that movie stars Clark Gable and Carole Lombard spent in the San Fernando Valley were some of their happiest--and for Gable, their most challenging. The pair got married shortly after Gable's epic turn as Rhett Butler in "Gone With the Wind" in 1939, during Lombard's run of uproarious screwball comedies typified by Howard Hawks' "Twentieth Century" in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992
"Lombard," Michael B. Druxman's one-woman play, with Taylor Leigh as actress Carole Lombard, has reopened for an indefinite run at the Charles E. Conrad Studio in Burbank. Information: (818) 569-4904.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows (or should) Carole Lombard in "To Be or Not to Be," but what did she do before? Similarly, what did "Mildred Pierce's" Joan Crawford do in the years after? Two new DVD sets from the TCM Vault Collection answer those questions. "Carole Lombard in the Thirties" presents three of the comedies in which the actress had smaller roles: "Brief Moment," "Lady by Choice" and "No More Orchids. " Similarly, "Joan Crawford in the Fifties" presents four of the juicy melodramas she starred in: "Queen Bee," "Harriet Craig," "The Story of Esther Costello" and "Autumn Leaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The screwball comedian--Carole Lombard--and the maverick film director--Orson Welles--had little in common. Except the fascination of Michael Druxman. Playwright Druxman has written separate plays about the two Hollywood legends, which highlight the upcoming fall season of theater in the San Fernando Valley. "Lombard" will open Oct. 24 at the Center Stage Theatre in Woodland Hills; "Orson Welles" begins at the same location in early November. "I've always enjoyed this concept," said Druxman, 50.
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