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Carolyn Heilbrun

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Carolyn G. Heilbrun, a distinguished feminist scholar who illuminated the female experience through erudite reinterpretations of classic English literature and in literate mystery novels written under the name Amanda Cross, was found dead in her New York City apartment Friday after an apparent suicide. She was 77.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Carolyn G. Heilbrun, a distinguished feminist scholar who illuminated the female experience through erudite reinterpretations of classic English literature and in literate mystery novels written under the name Amanda Cross, was found dead in her New York City apartment Friday after an apparent suicide. She was 77.
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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | PAULA SPAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Kate Fansler, erudite detective, does not actually exist. Wealthy, brainy, witty, willowy, prone to putting aside her duties as a tenured professor of literature at a very Columbia-like university just long enough to solve the occasional murder--how could she be real? She lives and offers her sardonic observations on the world only in the pages of mysteries by Amanda Cross. Who does not actually exist either.
BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | Marion Winik, Winik is an NPR commentator and the author, most recently, of "Telling: Confessions, Concessions, and Other Flashes of Light" (Villard)
When I heard that Carolyn Heilbrun had written a biography of Gloria Steinem, I was excited. Heilbrun's book "Writing a Woman's Life" has been required reading in women's studies classes since its publication in 1988 as a pioneering framework for understanding the lives of "women who write their own scripts." As Steinem is undoubtedly one such woman, this seemed an inspired pairing of biographer and subject.
MAGAZINE
August 23, 1992
With regard to Kay Mills' "Life After a Tenured Position" ( July 19) about Carolyn Heilbrun: When was the last time anyone gave up a cushy, tenured position because she saw someone else treated shabbily? Columbia University will look a long time before finding someone with Heilbrun's brilliance, integrity and courage. Could the administration there be unaware that Heilbrun is, in another life, the superb mystery writer, Amanda Cross. As her avid readers all realize, Cross has "How to Murder an Academic" down to a cold science.
MAGAZINE
July 19, 1992 | KAY MILLS, Kay Mills is author of "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer," a biography of the Mississippi civil rights leader, to be published in January by NAL/Dutton.
Shakespeare and Co., at 81st and Broadway in Manhattan, is one of those two-story, book-crammed shops that tempts you from all angles, not only with stacks of the new releases but also with artful displays of paperbacks that you might have been able to leave unbought if they'd been more discreetly shelved. A book season or so ago, feminist writer Carolyn G. Heilbrun, a k a Amanda Cross, wandered in with her friend Nancy K. Miller.
BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | Marion Winik, Winik is an NPR commentator and the author, most recently, of "Telling: Confessions, Concessions, and Other Flashes of Light" (Villard)
When I heard that Carolyn Heilbrun had written a biography of Gloria Steinem, I was excited. Heilbrun's book "Writing a Woman's Life" has been required reading in women's studies classes since its publication in 1988 as a pioneering framework for understanding the lives of "women who write their own scripts." As Steinem is undoubtedly one such woman, this seemed an inspired pairing of biographer and subject.
BOOKS
June 30, 2002 | REGINA MARLER, Regina Marler is the author of "Bloomsbury Pie: The Making of the Bloomsbury Boom."
For May Sarton's devoted readers, the real story since she died seven years ago is not the continued sales of her best-known books or the recent independent shoot of "Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing" but the shock and insult of Margot Peters' 1997 biography. Sarton, who warily handed over boxes of letters to her chosen biographer, had worried that the finished product would be less than flattering.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Writer Catherine Dain of Chatsworth, author of a series featuring female sleuth Freddie O'Neal, responded to my recent column on fictional detectives who wear skirts but act like men. Dain was nominated for a Shamus for "Lay It on the Line." Her newest Freddie O'Neal is "The Luck of the Draw." Dear Pat: Your friend thinks V.I. Warshawski is a guy? I guess worrying about blood stains on her favorite scarf wasn't feminine enough to suit him. She'll have to take a chromosome test.
BOOKS
June 14, 1992 | Francine Prose, Prose's most recent book is "Primitive People" (Farrar Straus Giroux)
Not long ago, a friend, a seemingly happily married woman, startled our other dinner guests by precipitously announcing that her husband had just joined Sexaholics Anonymous. Since his recovery mandated spontaneous ritual public confession, this normally retiring fellow described with some shame and also some swagger his addiction to furtive, pick-up sex with more than 300 women a year.
MAGAZINE
August 23, 1992
With regard to Kay Mills' "Life After a Tenured Position" ( July 19) about Carolyn Heilbrun: When was the last time anyone gave up a cushy, tenured position because she saw someone else treated shabbily? Columbia University will look a long time before finding someone with Heilbrun's brilliance, integrity and courage. Could the administration there be unaware that Heilbrun is, in another life, the superb mystery writer, Amanda Cross. As her avid readers all realize, Cross has "How to Murder an Academic" down to a cold science.
MAGAZINE
July 19, 1992 | KAY MILLS, Kay Mills is author of "This Little Light of Mine: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer," a biography of the Mississippi civil rights leader, to be published in January by NAL/Dutton.
Shakespeare and Co., at 81st and Broadway in Manhattan, is one of those two-story, book-crammed shops that tempts you from all angles, not only with stacks of the new releases but also with artful displays of paperbacks that you might have been able to leave unbought if they'd been more discreetly shelved. A book season or so ago, feminist writer Carolyn G. Heilbrun, a k a Amanda Cross, wandered in with her friend Nancy K. Miller.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | PAULA SPAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Kate Fansler, erudite detective, does not actually exist. Wealthy, brainy, witty, willowy, prone to putting aside her duties as a tenured professor of literature at a very Columbia-like university just long enough to solve the occasional murder--how could she be real? She lives and offers her sardonic observations on the world only in the pages of mysteries by Amanda Cross. Who does not actually exist either.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The talk is of beauty. And face lifts. And the temptation to have a face lift. Exasperated with the tentativeness of some remarks, Lucille Hubbard finally blurts out: "I've had a face lift. I never made it a secret. . . . About 10 years before I had it, I looked at myself and thought, 'My God, if a dress was this wrinkled and fit this poorly, I wouldn't wear it. . . .' It's not so much about looking younger. It's about looking better."
BOOKS
October 9, 1994 | Blanche Wiesen Cook, Blanche Wiesen Cook's "Eleanor Roosevelt" (Viking) won the 1992 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography
"No Ordinary Time" is no ordinary book. Filled with new and exciting material, it is the first joint portrait of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt during the war years. Since it is still possible, even routine, to read about F.D.R.'s presidency as if Eleanor had nothing to do with the best of Franklin's decisions, it is welcome and refreshing to find their political partnership at the center of discussion. I have long suspected that F.D.R.'s most earnest biographers avoided the war years because those years revealed a leader they preferred not to study: one who refused to confront many issues that have come to define the 20th Century, from race relations and Hitler's atrocities to the dominance of what President Eisenhower called the military-industrial complex.
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