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Carolyn See

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NEWS
September 12, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flowers are here--long-stemmed exotics drifting out of grand vases. So are the crudites, the pates and cheeses. There are bottles of wine--two reds and two whites. And a waiter in vest, dark pants and starched shirt, looping around the perimeter of Dutton's Brentwood Books' deep courtyard. The friends are here. Old colleagues and new. Family--immediate and extended. So are the students with fresh notebooks.
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BOOKS
May 14, 2006 | Veronique de Turenne, Veronique de Turenne is book critic for NPR's "Day to Day."
THERE'S a scene in Carolyn See's new novel, "There Will Never Be Another You," that could be a blueprint for this sly and stealthy rabbit-punch of a book. The 64-year-old narrator, Edith, a recent widow, is on a date at Culver City's Jazz Bakery. Four musicians -- three old guys in shiny suits and a young drummer dressed in sweats -- stroll onstage and play "There Will Never Be Another You." The audience sighs in recognition.
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NEWS
April 17, 1989 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Carolyn See, novelist and since 1981 a regular book reviewer for The Times, has won a Guggenheim Fellowship for fiction. The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awards fellowships annually to artists, scholars and scientists "on the basis of unusually distinguished achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment." This year's 198 winners, chosen from among 3,144 applicants, will receive awards totaling $5,251,000, according to an announcement by foundation president Joel Connarroe in New York earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
A veteran mystery writer whose thrillers are set in Orange County and San Diego took the top fiction honors at the Southern California Booksellers Assn. annual awards Saturday night. T. Jefferson Parker won for his 11th novel, "Cold Pursuit," the story of a San Diego homicide officer. Three years ago, Parker and his family moved to Fallbrook in northern San Diego County. Parker is known for bestselling books such as "Laguna Heat" and "Red Light," both of which were set in Orange County.
BOOKS
October 12, 1986 | Nora Johnson, Joh n son is the author of "Tender Offer" (Simon & Schuster). and
On Page 4 of this extraordinary new novel, Carolyn See writes disarmingly, "This is partly the story of Lorna Villanelle and me; two ladies absolutely crazed with the secret thought that they were something special. But if you think you aren't going to care about this story, hold on. It's the most important story in the Western world! Believe me." Believe her!
BOOKS
May 14, 2006 | Veronique de Turenne, Veronique de Turenne is book critic for NPR's "Day to Day."
THERE'S a scene in Carolyn See's new novel, "There Will Never Be Another You," that could be a blueprint for this sly and stealthy rabbit-punch of a book. The 64-year-old narrator, Edith, a recent widow, is on a date at Culver City's Jazz Bakery. Four musicians -- three old guys in shiny suits and a young drummer dressed in sweats -- stroll onstage and play "There Will Never Be Another You." The audience sighs in recognition.
NEWS
July 13, 1995
Carolyn See, novelist, essayist, book reviewer (the Los Angeles Times and the Washington Post) and winner of the Robert Kirsch Body of Work Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship in fiction, will conduct a weekend workshop from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 22 to 23 at Learning Tree University's Thousand Oaks Campus. This is a rare opportunity to learn from an accomplished, charismatic author how to create and craft the novel.
BOOKS
March 7, 1999 | HERBERT GOLD, Herbert Gold's most recent novel, "She Took My Arm As If She Loved Me," has been reissued in paperback (St. Martin's Press). He is also the author of "Bohemia" and "Fathers."
Carolyn See's tender and funny new novel begins with an extended serio-parodic Guggenheim application, dated August 2027, for a grant to study the work of the mystical genius artist, Peter Hampton. This is an odd and inciting preface to a novel about Hampton, circa 1996, $10-dollar-an-hour handyman in Los Angeles, drifter, lost soul, dilettante art student, would-be painter. I am ready to award the fellowship, even if the artist doesn't exist except in See's mind.
BOOKS
March 5, 1995 | John Leonard, John Leonard, TV critic of New York magazine, media critic at "CBS Sunday Morning," and book critic for the Nation, is the author of "The Last Innocent White Man in America."
Imagine knowing that it's Thanksgiving because your Uncle Bob sets himself on fire. That it's Easter because you are in Las Vegas, where the Risen Christ is a topless dancer on a skating rink, performing "Spice on Ice." Your grandfather, who took most of his hunting-guide wages in whiskey, dies drunk in a snowdrift. Your grandmother blows her head off with a shotgun. Your mother, with a pint of vodka in her Bible, plays tag at night inside a high-voltage power station.
BOOKS
September 15, 1991 | Bette Pesetsky, Pesetsky's latest book, "The Late Night Muse" (HarperCollins), will be published next month
In the California over which Carolyn See presides in her fifth novel, "Making History," the center of the world is the Pacific Rim. If to be a California writer is to have a certain self-awareness and mind set, then the author has surely grasped and presented the hard news about contemporary West Coast relationships in this novel, perceptive in its details and ambitious in its daring.
BOOKS
November 3, 2002 | Sven Birkerts, Sven Birkerts is the author of five books of essays and the recent memoir, "My Sky Blue Trades."
Posthumous gatherings of previously uncollected pieces all too often comprise outtakes, lectures and ephemeral prose that an author might not have intended for posterity. Thus, one feels a certain skepticism about the Modern Library's decision to collect seven essays of Eudora Welty.
NEWS
September 12, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flowers are here--long-stemmed exotics drifting out of grand vases. So are the crudites, the pates and cheeses. There are bottles of wine--two reds and two whites. And a waiter in vest, dark pants and starched shirt, looping around the perimeter of Dutton's Brentwood Books' deep courtyard. The friends are here. Old colleagues and new. Family--immediate and extended. So are the students with fresh notebooks.
BOOKS
March 7, 1999 | HERBERT GOLD, Herbert Gold's most recent novel, "She Took My Arm As If She Loved Me," has been reissued in paperback (St. Martin's Press). He is also the author of "Bohemia" and "Fathers."
Carolyn See's tender and funny new novel begins with an extended serio-parodic Guggenheim application, dated August 2027, for a grant to study the work of the mystical genius artist, Peter Hampton. This is an odd and inciting preface to a novel about Hampton, circa 1996, $10-dollar-an-hour handyman in Los Angeles, drifter, lost soul, dilettante art student, would-be painter. I am ready to award the fellowship, even if the artist doesn't exist except in See's mind.
NEWS
July 13, 1995
Carolyn See, novelist, essayist, book reviewer (the Los Angeles Times and the Washington Post) and winner of the Robert Kirsch Body of Work Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship in fiction, will conduct a weekend workshop from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 22 to 23 at Learning Tree University's Thousand Oaks Campus. This is a rare opportunity to learn from an accomplished, charismatic author how to create and craft the novel.
BOOKS
March 5, 1995 | John Leonard, John Leonard, TV critic of New York magazine, media critic at "CBS Sunday Morning," and book critic for the Nation, is the author of "The Last Innocent White Man in America."
Imagine knowing that it's Thanksgiving because your Uncle Bob sets himself on fire. That it's Easter because you are in Las Vegas, where the Risen Christ is a topless dancer on a skating rink, performing "Spice on Ice." Your grandfather, who took most of his hunting-guide wages in whiskey, dies drunk in a snowdrift. Your grandmother blows her head off with a shotgun. Your mother, with a pint of vodka in her Bible, plays tag at night inside a high-voltage power station.
BOOKS
September 15, 1991 | Bette Pesetsky, Pesetsky's latest book, "The Late Night Muse" (HarperCollins), will be published next month
In the California over which Carolyn See presides in her fifth novel, "Making History," the center of the world is the Pacific Rim. If to be a California writer is to have a certain self-awareness and mind set, then the author has surely grasped and presented the hard news about contemporary West Coast relationships in this novel, perceptive in its details and ambitious in its daring.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
A veteran mystery writer whose thrillers are set in Orange County and San Diego took the top fiction honors at the Southern California Booksellers Assn. annual awards Saturday night. T. Jefferson Parker won for his 11th novel, "Cold Pursuit," the story of a San Diego homicide officer. Three years ago, Parker and his family moved to Fallbrook in northern San Diego County. Parker is known for bestselling books such as "Laguna Heat" and "Red Light," both of which were set in Orange County.
BOOKS
November 3, 2002 | Sven Birkerts, Sven Birkerts is the author of five books of essays and the recent memoir, "My Sky Blue Trades."
Posthumous gatherings of previously uncollected pieces all too often comprise outtakes, lectures and ephemeral prose that an author might not have intended for posterity. Thus, one feels a certain skepticism about the Modern Library's decision to collect seven essays of Eudora Welty.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Carolyn See, novelist and since 1981 a regular book reviewer for The Times, has won a Guggenheim Fellowship for fiction. The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awards fellowships annually to artists, scholars and scientists "on the basis of unusually distinguished achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment." This year's 198 winners, chosen from among 3,144 applicants, will receive awards totaling $5,251,000, according to an announcement by foundation president Joel Connarroe in New York earlier this week.
BOOKS
October 12, 1986 | Nora Johnson, Joh n son is the author of "Tender Offer" (Simon & Schuster). and
On Page 4 of this extraordinary new novel, Carolyn See writes disarmingly, "This is partly the story of Lorna Villanelle and me; two ladies absolutely crazed with the secret thought that they were something special. But if you think you aren't going to care about this story, hold on. It's the most important story in the Western world! Believe me." Believe her!
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