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Carrageenan

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September 9, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Filipinos call it a "wonder powder"--a seaweed derivative that's being used as a substitute for fat in meat. It also binds the substances in toothpaste and shampoos. It gives body to dairy products, puddings and pie fillings. And now, boosters say, it may do wonders for the faltering economy of the Philippines. Carrageenan, as the product is officially known, is suddenly hot because of McDonald's Corp.'
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BUSINESS
September 9, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Filipinos call it a "wonder powder"--a seaweed derivative that's being used as a substitute for fat in meat. It also binds the substances in toothpaste and shampoos. It gives body to dairy products, puddings and pie fillings. And now, boosters say, it may do wonders for the faltering economy of the Philippines. Carrageenan, as the product is officially known, is suddenly hot because of McDonald's Corp.'
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FOOD
March 23, 1989 | From the Baltimore Sun
Here are some commonly used food additives: Alpha tocopherol: Vitamin E. Prevents rancidity in vegetable oils. Annato: Food coloring. Ascorbic acid: Vitamin C. Prevents loss of color and flavor. Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT): Prevent rancidity in oils and in foods that contain oils. Carrageenan: Thickening agent in creamy foods. Casein: Thickens and whitens foods.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Chocolate milk in the cafeteria contributes to obesity in children, says one side. But without it, kids might not consume enough calcium, argues the other side. As school districts across the nation consider banning the cafeteria milk of choice (as well as strawberry-flavored milk), here’s a quick break down of the calorie content of chocolate milk from Fitday :  “Whole chocolate milk, made from whole milk, has the most fat and calories. An 8 oz. glass has 210 calories.” “Reduced fat chocolate milk is made from either 1% or 2% milk, and an 8 oz. glass has 160 to 170 calories.” “Skim chocolate milk, made from skim milk, is lowest in calories at 160 for an 8 oz. glass.” Chocolate adds about 60 calories to white milk—an addition that, if not done in moderation, could add several pounds by the end of one year (this article estimates 10 pounds)
FOOD
April 4, 1991 | TONI TIPTON
If mayonnaise is mostly eggs and oil, what's in fat-free mayonnaise? If fat makes cakes light and airy, why isn't fat-free cake rubbery? If whipping cream and eggs make ice cream creamy smooth, what does the job in fat-free ice cream? The answer: commercial thickeners. The labels call them gums: agar, xanthan, carob bean or guar gum, carrageenan, maltodextrin. These sticky substances have all passed rigorous Food and Drug Administration safety testing.
FOOD
June 6, 1991 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you love your hamburgers but hate the fat they contain, there's a solution, now that new, specially treated low-fat ground beef is available to retail consumers. Called Miller's Ultimate, this 93% fat-free product was introduced to all Lucky markets last week. The effects of fat are simulated by a formula that combines very lean meat with water, carrageenan, hydrolized vegetable protein and encapsulated salt.
HEALTH
May 27, 2002 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: More than 50 years ago, when I was a child, my mother rubbed Save-the-Baby on our chests when we had a bad cold. In the early 1960s, I used it on my own children. Do you know if Save-the-Baby is still made and where I could get some for my grandchildren? Answer: We appreciate your nostalgia, but it might not be such a shame that this old-fashioned remedy has become hard to find. It contained camphor, which can be toxic if ingested.
HEALTH
March 10, 2008 | Susan Bowerman, Special to The Times
A vegetarian restaurant on the Mendocino coast has begun serving a six-course "sea vegetable dinner," featuring sea palm, nori, dulse and wakame -- different forms of seaweed. Though they're not your typical fare in the U.S., fresh sea vegetables are eaten all over the world by those who live close to the source. Asian cuisines feature the most seaweed, but it's also found on the menu in Scandinavia, Scotland and Peru. In Nova Scotia, they dine on sea parsley, or dulse; in northeast Siberia they eat kelp harvested from the Bering Sea. It's a bit of a misnomer to call them vegetables -- seaweeds are algae, and most are not considered members of the plant kingdom.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2007 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
What was intended as a noble science experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help Third World nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan -- the gelatinous thickener and emulsifier used in such items as toothpaste, shoe polish and nonfat ice cream. The late Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | DIANE DUSTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
You know too much fat is bad for you, but there's something irresistible about a charcoal-broiled steak. Potato chips, french fries, ice cream, butter sauce--why is fat so hard to avoid? Why do food processors load their products with it? Because, no matter what your head tells you, your nose, mouth and stomach love fat, experts say. Even those with the most official of intentions may end up making excuses for people who relish fatty foods.
OPINION
April 19, 2008 | Daphne Miller, Daphne Miller is a doctor, associate clinical professor at UC San Francisco and the author of "The Jungle Effect: A doctor discovers the healthiest diets from around the world, why they work and how to bring them home."
Our ancestors had better eating habits than we do -- that seems to be the current thinking. February marked the inauguration of the first global seed vault in northern Norway, a place to preserve vanishing plant species that were grown or foraged by generations past. Almost daily, it seems, the news media report on another initiative to protect indigenous ways of farming and preparing food.
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