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October 19, 2012
It's among every parent's worst nightmares: You turn your back for just a second, and suddenly your child is in the middle of the street. According to a new study, those worries are not unfounded: Jaywalking and darting into the street are the most common reasons children are struck by vehicles, according to a study released at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. More than 5,000 Americans of all ages are struck and killed by cars every year, and many more accidents lead to significant head injuries.
January 17, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Cristiano Ronaldo cried when he accepted the Ballon d'Or, soccer's most prestigious individual prize, earlier this week. But now it's the athletic training staff with his club team, Real Madrid, that is feeling a bit overwhelmed. That's because Ronaldo said he'll soon make good on a promise to buy each of the five trainers a new car of their choice. Ronaldo unseated Lionel Messi, a four-time winner, as FIFA's player of the year largely because Messi was sidelined during part of 2013 because of an injury.
January 9, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Two consecutive lawsuits and three plans and we still haven't properly resolved the Yosemite Valley dilemma. It's one of the most gorgeous spots in the world, but that can be hard to appreciate in summertime when you spend most of your time staring at the rear bumper of the car in front of you because of traffic so intense that people can walk faster than you can drive. And that's saying something, because the throngs of people are so dense that getting from Point A to Point B on foot can involve a fair amount of pedestrian maneuvering, braking and cutting in front.
February 5, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Ruben Vives
A 19-year-old man killed in a hit-and-run in South Los Angeles was the oldest of four siblings who loved working on his prized possession - his Infiniti - friends and family said Wednesday morning at the site where he died. Police say Jerry Arredondo Jr. was hit Tuesday night as he stepped out of his car, parked on 105th Street just east of Wadsworth Avenue. A speeding eastbound 2013 Chevy Camaro hit the teen, launching him into the air and several feet down the street. His body hit a small tree with such force it split its trunk in half.
July 3, 2010 | By Usama Redha and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
In a dangerous country, it may be one of the quickest tickets to the afterlife. Those driving white or gray Nissan Sunny sedans flirt with the very real possibility of being hit with a spray of gunfire, or their vehicle being rigged with a bomb. At least 28 such assaults have occurred since March, police say, five of them in the last 10 days. What makes the Sunny such an appealing target? It's a model the Iraqi government provides to its intelligence services, military and police forces.
June 20, 2011 | Jerry Hirsch
That spare tire in your trunk may be going the way of the typewriter and transistor radio. Automakers are selling more cars without an extra wheel to trim weight, boost gas mileage and shave a few bucks off their costs. What happens if you get a flat? Some manufacturers equip cars with run-flat tires, while others are putting flat repair kits in the trunk. Both alternatives have drawbacks, and many motorists say the trend is unsettling. "I like the security of having a spare.
February 13, 2010 | By Hugo Martín
The recalls of several Toyota models over the last month not only have sparked angst at Toyota dealerships but also have created headaches for car rental companies that offer the vehicles. The nation's largest rental companies have been rushing to pull thousands of recalled models off the road and assure renters that all the remaining cars are safe. But it hasn't been easy. After all, rental vehicles roll in and out at a fast pace all day long. So rounding up each recalled car, including those used for long-term rentals, has been a chore.
November 3, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
No car, no work. That's the conclusion Lisa Twombly reached as she fought to hang on to her job as a caretaker for an elderly San Diego couple. Taking the bus and bumming rides from friends wasn't cutting it, and she was repeatedly late for work. Told she'd be fired if it happened again, Twombly put down $4,000 - all her savings - on a 9-year-old Chrysler Sebring with 95,000 miles. The dealership lent her the $2,600 balance at a steep 18% interest rate. A few months later, the Sebring broke down and she got into a dispute with the dealer over who should pay for repairs.
June 27, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Late last week, Pixar faced a rare bout of skepticism. For the first time this decade, the Walt Disney Co.-owned animation studio with an unblemished record of commercial and critical success was releasing a new film, "Cars 2," that was expected to underperform at the box office. Reviews were largely negative, and pre-release surveys indicated the film would have an unimpressive debut of close to $50 million. "Was it a scary proposition for a moment in time? Yes, it was," said Chuck Viane, Walt Disney Studios' distribution president.
Don't worry about Joanna--she'll be warm tonight. She'll park in her old neighborhood, on a street with no security patrol and tall hedges in front of the houses, so no one will notice her car. She'll open the window a crack, lock the doors, curl up in warm clothes beneath blankets. Tomorrow she'll do the Beverly Center. Or maybe Westside Pavilion. She'll wash her hair and underwear in Nordstrom's ladies' room, dry them under the hand blower, apply makeup from testers at the cosmetic counter downstairs.
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