Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCarson River
IN THE NEWS

Carson River

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Arco has purchased 480 acres in the Sierra Nevada for the Washoe Tribe as part of a settlement over pollution from an abandoned sulfur mine in rural Alpine County. The settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency resolves Arco's liability for failing to prevent ponds of acid mine drainage at Leviathan Mine from spilling over and contaminating the Carson River watershed in 1998. The property, purchased for $720,000, is north of Stampede Reservoir in Sierra County.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Arco has purchased 480 acres in the Sierra Nevada for the Washoe Tribe as part of a settlement over pollution from an abandoned sulfur mine in rural Alpine County. The settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency resolves Arco's liability for failing to prevent ponds of acid mine drainage at Leviathan Mine from spilling over and contaminating the Carson River watershed in 1998. The property, purchased for $720,000, is north of Stampede Reservoir in Sierra County.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as he has for most of his 67 years, Steven James stands on the river's edge and watches the springtime come roaring into the Washoe Indian reservation here in the foothills of the eastern Sierra. Each April, the east fork of the Carson River flows with greater fury, fed by snowmelt from the towering mountain peaks. For generations, the Washoe have viewed the seasonal runoff as a spiritual force sent down from the heavens. But now the Carson's thundering cascade strikes fear into the tribe.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as he has for most of his 67 years, Steven James stands on the river's edge and watches the springtime come roaring into the Washoe Indian reservation here in the foothills of the eastern Sierra. Each April, the east fork of the Carson River flows with greater fury, fed by snowmelt from the towering mountain peaks. For generations, the Washoe have viewed the seasonal runoff as a spiritual force sent down from the heavens. But now the Carson's thundering cascade strikes fear into the tribe.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Efforts to expand California's Wild and Scenic River program for the first time since it began in 1972 have become snared in controversies over logging and water management issues. State Resources Agency Secretary Gordon K. Van Vleck has been peppered with dozens of letters on whether to support adding three rivers to the state program, which was modeled on a more stringent federal system. The state program, however, only limits dam building.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Backed by state Resources Secretary Gordon K. Van Vleck, Assemblyman Byron D. Sher (D-Palo Alto) has nominated two rivers to join the state's Wild and Scenic Rivers System. If approved by the Legislature, the East Carson River in Alpine County and West Walker River in Mono County would be the first additions to the system since it began in 1972.
NEWS
August 20, 1986
A bill that would prohibit development of dams, reservoirs or water impoundment facilities until 1990 on certain streams of the McCloud River, the East Fork of the Carson River and the West Walker River was passed by the Assembly 42 to 23 and sent to the governor. The bill by Assemblyman Byron D. Sher (D-Palo Alto) was called by Assemblyman Larry Stirling (R-San Diego) "an attempt to deprive the people of Southern California of half their water supply."
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
An agreement on a new cleanup at an abandoned Sierra sulfur mine that has polluted nearby streams for years was announced Thursday by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Keith Takata, head of the EPA's Superfund program for the Pacific Southwest, said his agency reached the Leviathan Mine agreement with California's Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
An abandoned sulfur mine that for decades has spewed a toxic soup of acid and heavy metals in the scenic Sierra Nevada was proposed for Superfund status Thursday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Superfund listing is reserved for the worst of the worst of the nation's polluted areas. Leviathan Mine in remote Alpine County, Calif., near the Nevada line, will join about 1,400 sites on the list if the designation is approved.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
The federal Environmental Protection Agency has formally told Atlantic Richfield Co. to assist in the cleanup of the Leviathan Mine, recently designated a Superfund environmental site. Arco is a former owner of the mine in Alpine County, about 20 miles south of Lake Tahoe. Leviathan has been leaking a mixture of acids and dissolved metals into creeks that drain into the Carson River for years, discoloring the streams and making portions of them incapable of sustaining life.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Efforts to expand California's Wild and Scenic River program for the first time since it began in 1972 have become snared in controversies over logging and water management issues. State Resources Agency Secretary Gordon K. Van Vleck has been peppered with dozens of letters on whether to support adding three rivers to the state program, which was modeled on a more stringent federal system. The state program, however, only limits dam building.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2012 | By Jay Jones
In a state with nearly 38 million residents, it's inconceivable that there's a county with a peewee population. But Alpine County, with just 1,102 residents, is by far California's smallest. But what this county, in the Sierra Nevada about half an hour south of Lake Tahoe, lacks in numbers, it more than makes up for in recreational opportunities. The bed Although Markleeville (population 210) is the county seat, the best bet for cozy lodging is about 15 miles north at Sorensen's Resort (14255 Highway 88, Hope Valley; [800]
NATIONAL
April 8, 2013 | By John. M. Glionnna
LAS VEGAS - Nevada authorities believe a violent struggle with intruders in his apartment led to the death of the state's chief insurance examiner, whose body was apparently found Saturday wrapped in a blanket and bound with duct tape in the Carson River.  Carson City Sheriff's deputies said that they are still waiting for the cause of death and identification to be officially confirmed, but investigators believe the body found by searchers is...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|