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WORLD
June 3, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
More than half of the "breathtaking" sums of money earned by Mexican drug cartels in the U.S. and smuggled into this country dissolves into Mexico's cash-based economy, eluding detection and funding vast criminal operations, according to a new U.S.-Mexican government study released Wednesday. The study, described by a senior U.S. official as the first of its kind, attempts to explore the ways illicit drug-trafficking profits make their way from the United States to Mexico or Colombia and how to stem the tide.
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WORLD
April 14, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
  Sixteen police officers have been arrested for allegedly providing cover to drug-cartel gangsters suspected in the grisly slaying of more than 120 people whose bodies are being pulled from mass graves in northeastern Mexico. The federal attorney general's office, in a statement, identified the 16 as members of the municipal police force in the town of San Fernando, near where the bodies were found. On Thursday, officials in the border state of Tamaulipas said the number of dead who have been extracted from several pits about 90 miles south of Brownsville, Texas, had risen to 126. Digging continued in search of additional victims, the officials said.
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican federal police and army agents seized three Lear jets, thousands of dollars in cash and more than two dozen suspected drug traffickers--including uniformed police officers--in a major blow to Mexico's most powerful drug cartel, authorities said Monday. The Mexican attorney general's office said it linked the jets and the 25 detained pilots, passengers and police officers--some of whom are federal agents--to the Juarez drug-trafficking cartel.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | STUART AUERBACH, THE WASHINGTON POST
Atty. Gen. William P. Barr said Friday that the Bush Administration within "weeks" will make a major redefinition of antitrust policy to enable the Justice Department to go after Japanese industrial cartels that restrict American exports. "I think the antitrust laws will be a useful tool against cartels that are excluding U.S. exports," Barr said in an interview on John McLaughlin's "One on One" television show. Barr denied that the policy change was motivated by political considerations.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year ago, Haitian public security chief Robert Manuel warned of "macabre plots" by international drug cartels to infiltrate his impoverished nation, co-opt its politicians, corrupt its nascent U.S.-built police force and foment disorder. The occasion: A large shipment of Colombian cocaine destined for the United States had been abandoned in the village of Aquin on Haiti's south coast. Peasants began to divide the spoils.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2012 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The white sport utility vehicle was first spotted winding its way through the rugged desert mountains of southern Arizona about 4:30 a.m. Saturday. Federal and local authorities gave chase, but by the time they found it, it was too late for five people aboard. Four hours after the initial spotting by a Border Patrol agent, authorities found the smoldering wreckage of the Ford Expedition where it had gone off the road in the Vekol Valley. The five bodies inside were burned beyond recognition.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOSE DIAZ BRISENO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a hail of gunfire in the heart of the Mexican capital, attackers Thursday wounded a former top anti-drug official whom U.S. authorities recently had accused of aiding narcotics kingpins, local media reported. The shooting of Cuauhtemoc Herrera Suastegui, along with a recent mysterious death, rocked the Justice Ministry, the main Mexican institution fighting the U.S.-bound drug trade.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of accusations this week linked Mexico's most notorious drug cartel to money-laundering scams that touch the highest levels of the nation's political, financial and labor elite. First, it emerged that the laundrymen of the Juarez cartel tried to buy a controlling share of a struggling bank. Then it was reported that they tried to go into business with President Ernesto Zedillo's brother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
An accountant who oversaw a money laundering operation that funneled more than $50 million in drug profits to Colombia's Medellin cocaine cartel was sentenced Monday to 30 years in prison in what was believed to be the longest sentence ever imposed in a money laundering case. But in a setback to the government's efforts to enforce a tough new drug kingpin statute in Southern California, U.S. District Judge Robert M.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent and
Ten times a year, the diamond industry's elite--about 150 dealers, wholesalers and cutting factory owners--come here from all over the world. The occasion is called a "sight" and its participants--more than a dozen of them from the United States--are "sight holders." They gather every five weeks at 17 Charterhouse St., headquarters of the Central Selling Organization, the marketing arm of the international diamond cartel run by De Beers of South Africa.
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