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WORLD
September 1, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Two women from the world of Mexico City journalism were abducted and slain, their naked, bound bodies found Thursday in a field behind a cemetery, authorities said. Although dozens of journalists have been killed, kidnapped or threatened as part of Mexico's spiraling violence, this appears to be the first time news media employees have been slain in the relative safe harbor of Mexico City. It was not immediately known whether the attacks on the women were related to their work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2012 | Steve Lopez
Illegal drugs by the tons are smuggled into California each year by sea, by land and by air. Cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin are either produced in or pass through Mexico, where 50,000 people have been killed in the last six years in an escalating war among cartels. Some of the victims have been beheaded, mutilated or left hanging from bridges, not necessarily because of their involvement in the trade, but as a diabolical demonstration that the drug lords will stop at nothing to dominate the market.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
U.S. anti-drug agencies suffer from "large gaps" in their knowledge of how the Colombian cocaine cartels operate, and even when important information is obtained, it is not used effectively, a Senate report obtained Monday concludes. The report of the Republican staff of the Senate Governmental Affairs permanent investigations subcommittee, which began its inquiry a year ago, charged that U.S.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2008 | Richard A. Serrano, Serrano is a Times staff writer.
Federal authorities in Atlanta announced grand jury indictments Wednesday against 41 people allegedly connected to violent Mexican drug cartels, including a former deputy sheriff from Texas stopped with nearly $1 million in cash hidden in his pickup on a Georgia highway. The trafficking operation moved hundreds of kilograms of cocaine and marijuana from the Southwest border to Atlanta, authorities said.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican officials said Saturday that they have arrested a veteran boss of a drug cartel that smuggles Colombian cocaine up Mexico's Pacific Coast into the United States, and thus crippled a major branch of the Juarez cartel. Mariano Herran Salvatti, Mexico's top drug prosecutor, told reporters that agents arrested Juan Jose Quintero Payan, a longtime trafficker, when he arrived at a house in Guadalajara on Friday night for a tryst with his lover.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Amid a campaign of terror by Colombian cocaine barons, bombs exploded Sunday at nine banks--one of the blasts killing a university student--and radio stations reported the resignation of a key Cabinet official in President Virgilio Barco Vargas' war against the traffickers.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican authorities said Tuesday that they had smashed the country's main synthetic drug cartel, dealing a powerful blow to methamphetamine trafficking into California and other American states. Mexico's top anti-drug official, Mariano Herran Salvatti, told reporters that police arrested the suspected cartel leaders, Luis and Jesus Amezcua-Contreras, and seized 125 properties and businesses that were being used to smuggle the drugs and launder the profits.
SPORTS
February 5, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the year of living dangerously in Colombia. A presidential candidate was assassinated in August, leading to a declaration of war by the government against the drug cartels. By the end of 1989, the death toll reached more than 300. Yet, when Credencial magazine polled 344 people in four cities about the year's top news story in Colombia, the assassination of presidential candidate Luis Carlos Galan finished second at 19.8%. The drug war was third at 12.3%. The winner, 39.
OPINION
March 25, 2010 | By Jorge Castañeda
In Ciudad Juarez this month, Mexican President Felipe Calderon insisted that appearances notwithstanding, drug violence had begun to recede thanks to the yearlong presence of 10,000 Mexican troops in the border city. Yet according to his own government's figures, there have been 536 executions in Juarez since Jan. 1, which is 100 more than during the same period last year. And the violence is not localized to a few border towns like Juarez. Over a holiday weekend in Acapulco this month, 34 people were assassinated in drug-related incidents; nearly 20 suffered the same fate in the drug-producing state of Sinaloa; and perhaps most poignant, two graduate students from Mexico's premier private university, Monterrey Tech, lost their lives March 19, victims of crossfire as the Mexican military pursued drug cartel members at the entrance to the campus.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police intensified a nationwide hunt for the leaders of Mexico's notorious Arellano drug cartel Saturday after state and federal prosecutors named them as prime suspects in last week's murder of former Jalisco Atty. Gen. Leobardo Larios Guzman.
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