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Cartoon Characters

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Benedict, 94, an animator who designed many famous cartoon characters including Fred Flintstone, Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound, died Monday, his friend David Scheve said. Benedict died at home in Auburn, Calif. Scheve did not know the cause. Born in Ohio and raised in L.A., Benedict started his career in cartoon animation in the 1930s at the Disney studio before moving to Universal and then back to Disney in the early '40s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2012 | Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Lucille Bliss, who provided the voice of the cartoon character Crusader Rabbit in the early days of television and gained recognition a generation later as the voice of Smurfette in the 1980s television hit "The Smurfs," has died. She was 96. Bliss died Nov. 8 from natural causes at an assisted living center in Costa Mesa, according to the Orange County coroner. Bliss parlayed a childhood love of radio theater into a career as an animation voice actress that stretched more than 60 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL
The spy who scammed me . . . Safe house . . . Staying in touch. Ever ponder which cartoon characters live clean and sober, and which don't? Well, ponder no more. Somebody has actually performed a study of the smoking and drinking habits of the two-dimensional stars of animated films. The results, attached to a Los Angeles Superior Court suit against the Walt Disney Co., just might surprise you: Ten characters in "Pinocchio" puff stogies, including Gepetto and the wooden boy himself.
OPINION
July 18, 2012
Re "A bear who tweets in the woods," July 14 When will people stop treating wild animals as entertainment? This poor bear will probably be killed eventually because of the ignorance and unwillingness of people to respect wild animals as they are, not as cartoon characters. If the bear had killed someone's pet or injured a human, people would be crying for its destruction. The biggest culprits in this drama are the continuing encroachment into wildlife habit by developers and the 2009 Station fire, which reduced hunting ranges and food supplies.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Tom Wilson isn't a betting man. And neither is Ziggy, the luckless cartoon strip character he created 20 years ago. So Wilson was slightly befuddled when the Ohio Lottery Commission recently proposed a deal for an ad campaign that would feature his poor-sap character, Ziggy. "They thought that he could be the little guy in the big world who didn't know how to play the lottery--but could learn," said Wilson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a plane with a protest banner buzzed overhead and picketers shouted their complaints, a helicopter Monday pulled a cover from Paramount Pictures' latest publicity stunt, a 75-foot-high Kim Basinger look-alike perched coyly atop the "D" in the Hollywood sign. "Paramount Not A Good Neighbor," read the banner, ordered up by homeowners who, in a suit against the city of Los Angeles, are seeking a ban on all commercial use of the sign.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bullwinkle J. Moose and Rocket J. Squirrel are taking their act to Universal City. MCA Inc., parent of Universal Studios, has acquired worldwide merchandising and theme park rights to the slightly bent Bullwinkle cartoon crowd in a long-term deal with the heirs of creator Jay Ward. MCA expects to have Bullwinkle merchandise in stores by Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hey, Rocky, watch how they pulled this rabbit out of the hat! Bullwinkle would have been delighted at how the trick finally worked when one group of Los Angeles residents decided to use an annual art show to honor the memory of a beloved neighbor. Along with huge banners celebrating fine art and emerging young artists, residents of Park La Brea have placed a giant Rocky and Bullwinkle banner atop one of their 14-story towers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Bedrock must have one heck of a visitors bureau. Hundreds of Flintstones fans descended on Vasquez Rocks on Saturday where sets for the cartoon-turned-movie have been built. Parents and youngsters alike strolled down the 200 block of Cobblestone Way where the fabled Fred and Wilma Flintstone live next to Barney and Betty Rubble. "It's un-American to not be a fan of the Flintstones, isn't it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly 300 boys tried out for the voice of Norman Normanmeyer Jr. in "The Addams Family," an animated series scheduled for this fall on ABC. Dick Beals was selected. He's 65. Getting the role in the Hanna-Barbera series was no surprise. Beals believes he has played more children's parts as a voice actor than anyone else. "Happens all the time. With me, the studio doesn't need a mother around to control their kid, doesn't have to worry about my schooling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
Alexander Anderson Jr., a pioneer television cartoonist who created the landmark duo of Crusader Rabbit and Rags the Tiger and two of TV's most enduring characters, Rocky and Bullwinkle, has died. He was 90. Anderson, a longtime resident of Pebble Beach who had Alzheimer's disease, died Friday at a rest home in Carmel, said his son, Terry M. Anderson. The nephew of Paul Terry, whose Terrytoons cartoons included "Mighty Mouse" and "Heckle and Jeckle," the Berkeley-born Anderson had apprenticed at his uncle's studio in New Rochelle, N.Y., as a young man before serving in World War II and returned to work there after the war. With television beginning its domination over radio as the at-home entertainment medium of choice in the late 1940s, Anderson proposed that his uncle begin producing cartoons specifically for the newer medium.
OPINION
September 23, 2010 | Meghan Daum
I t's true that Christine O'Donnell, Delaware's surprise senatorial candidate, bears some resemblance to Sarah Palin. Both are attractive brunettes who've staked their political careers on extreme social conservatism. Both emerged on the national stage seemingly out of nowhere and proceeded to make liberals and even a lot of Republicans slap their collective foreheads in disbelief. Perhaps most important, both are catnip for a media that loves to search for skeletons in closets that also happen to contain several pairs of designer pumps.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Deirdre Lockwood, Chicago Tribune
Children can be influenced to eat sugary snacks that carry stickers of cartoon characters such as Shrek, Scooby-Doo or Dora the Explorer, but not healthier foods like carrots with similar stickers, according to a new Yale University study. Researchers at Yale's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity asked children ages 4 to 6 which snacks they wanted: gummy fruit, graham crackers or carrots labeled with stickers of the cartoon characters, or identical snacks without the stickers.
IMAGE
November 1, 2009 | Sophia Kercher
Hello Kitty is all grown up. The docile little creature with red bow and yellow button nose turns 35 today. And just look at her now! At her inception in the 1970s, few could have known that the cute cartoon would become a global phenom complete with a theme park, TV series and restaurant featuring an image of her sweet whiskered face baked into bread. Indeed, Ms. Kitty has come a long way from her Japanese homeland. Christian Dior, Cynthia Rowley, Betsey Johnson and Kimora Lee Simmons have all hopped on the Hello Kitty pop icon bandwagon over the years, whisking the kitten around the world in high style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Larry Johnson was still a graduate student at California Institute of the Arts when he made "Untitled (Movie Stars on Clouds)," 1982/84, a group of six celestial color photographs with the names of celluloid actors floating in cumulus splendor. They're installed in a row at the entrance to his survey exhibition at the UCLA Hammer Museum -- high up on the wall, so that you literally look up to the stars in the pale blue sky -- and they function as a remarkable touchstone for the 60 works that follow.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
In this topsy-turvy financial climate, developing new work skills is almost essential. Now, departing News Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer Peter Chernin can add "animated character" to his resume after lending his voice to Fox's "Family Guy." In the episode, which aired Sunday, Chernin played himself as he heard a show pitch from the rotund and often boisterous Peter Griffith (voiced by creator Seth MacFarlane). As News Corp.'s No.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | DAVE LESHER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cheered on by a crowd of screaming and sign-waving school kids, President Bush visited Orange County for the second time in a year Friday to underscore the nationwide scourge of drugs and highlight the county's successes in combatting it.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | JANE HULSE
Larry Scott's first- and second-grade classroom at Saticoy Elementary School has the usual signs of learning--the alphabet scrawled across the wall and stacks of books. But what's this? Smiling down at the children from above the alphabet is Mickey Mouse. Next to him is the venerable duck elder Uncle Scrooge and the three duck nephews, Huey, Dewey and Louie, perusing a book. That's not all. More cartoon posters fill the walls--Peter Pan, Bugs Bunny, Mighty Mouse, Donald Duck, the Little Mermaid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Millard Kaufman, the Oscar-nominated screenwriter of "Bad Day at Black Rock" and the co-creator of Mr. Magoo who waited until he was 90 to become a first-time novelist, has died. He was 92. Kaufman died of heart failure Saturday, two days after his birthday, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his son, Frederick Kaufman.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2008 | Peter Slevin, Slevin writes for the Washington Post.
In his first interview since he became an issue in the presidential campaign, William Ayers, the former Weather Underground leader, said that he had a distant relationship with Barack Obama and that Obama's opponents had turned him into "a cartoon character." Ayers, now an education professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, said he thought the accusation by Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin that Obama had been "palling around with terrorists" was absurd. "Pal around together?
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