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January 24, 2011
MOVIES Barbara Hammer: Experimenting in Life and Art The avant-garde filmmaker, a leading figure in lesbian and feminist cinema, appears to screen and discuss two of her recent works. "Generations" (2010), which she made with Gina Carducci, deals with aging and passing on the tradition of personal filmmaking; "A Horse Is Not a Metaphor" (2009) confronts Hammer's battle with cancer and experiences in chemotherapy. REDCAT , 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. $9. (213)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Scott Collins
When he takes command of CBS' "Late Show" next year, Stephen Colbert will have to battle the two Jimmys, Fallon and Kimmel. But he'll also square off against a robot chicken, a mad scientist and a talking hamburger. From the humblest of beginnings 13 years ago - one early offering was made with microphones purchased at Radio Shack - Adult Swim, Cartoon Network's nighttime block, has a powerful hold on one of the most highly sought-after populations around: young men. Adult Swim's mostly animated shows - among them hits such as "Robot Chicken," "Aqua Teen Hunger Force" spinoffs and the new "Rick and Morty" - rely on absurdist, often surreal humor, and they're making it harder than ever for the growing crowd of chat shows featuring celebrities hawking their latest movie.
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NEWS
September 27, 2009 | Andre Schiffrin, Andre Schiffrin is the editor of "Dr. Seuss & Co. Go to War," to be published this week by the New Press.
Few Americans now remember the vast political battles that divided the United States during World War II. We look back in a patriotic haze at a nation that seemed united but was, in fact, as divided as it is today. A decade ago, the book "Dr. Seuss Goes to War" showed that Theodor Seuss Geisel, in addition to his many children's books, was a very engaged political cartoonist during the war years. His cartoons lambasted the American isolationists and then the Axis foes daily, from 1940 to 1943, in PM, the radical New York tabloid.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Tuna, a Chiweenie with an overbite and more than 700,000 followers on Instagram, was there. So were Lassie, Rin Tin Tin, Beethoven, Marley, Toto and several other dogs of renown. The canine A-list had gathered in Hollywood in February to celebrate one of their own. Yes, they had also come because their trainers were tossing bits of hot dog onto the red carpet, but really, the main attraction was Mr. Peabody, the hyper-intelligent, time-traveling beagle from the 1960s cartoon shorts "Peabody's Improbable History," who was getting his paw prints enshrined at the TCL Chinese Theatre.
SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | By David Wharton
The fallout over Tokyo hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics has begun. So to speak. A satirical French newspaper called Le Canard enchaine  has published cartoons that reference both the Games and radioactive leaks at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant. One cartoon shows a pair of sumo wrestlers with extra arms and legs. They are wrestling in front of the plant while a commentator says: "Thanks to Fukushima, sumo wrestling is now an Olympic sport. " Another cartoon shows two people in protective gear inspecting an Olympic pool with their Geiger counter.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014
Barack Obama was first sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2009, and, from that day to this, a battle for the soul of America has been waged. The half-decade since has been one of the most politically polarized periods in U.S. history as conservative talk radio hosts, Fox News commentators, secretive billionaire campaign financiers, the NRA, the tea party movement and right wing celebrities such as Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck have all tried to delegitimize the...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1999
When we read the article about Yogi Bear and his sidekicks, we were truly upset to learn that the artistic creations of Joe Barbera and Bill Hanna are to be used in a manner for which they were never intended ("Yogi Bear Gets a Bit of the Ren & Stimpy Attitude," by Michael P. Lucas, Sept. 23). Putting names of characters created by Barbera and Hanna on entirely different, evil and horrible replacements is an insult to the designers and the viewers, especially to children. People throughout the world truly love and appreciate these extremely talented gentlemen and their fabulous cartoons, and it seems the happy images they created are being destroyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Although (and also because) they exist at the margins of what we talk about when we talk about television -- cable drama eating up most of that air, unfairly -- cartoons are among the most original, personal, forward-looking and also historically conscious works the medium has to offer. And much as advances in home-recording technology democratized music, better and more affordable animation software has helped open up TV, in its coat of many platforms, to new and independent voices.
OPINION
March 27, 2005
I was delighted to see that you dropped the cartoon format of the Opinion section March 20 and printed some substantive articles. I read most of the Opinion section for the first time in several months. Please continue to improve the quality and substance. Janet Howell Valencia I am so tired of the really tired opinion that cartoons are always childish and/or only for kids. Many deep and profound ideas can be said with an image with a few lines. You still seem to have many written opinion columns, so it's not as if a few drawings have suddenly brought down the quality of the writing.
WORLD
February 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Newspapers in France, Germany, Italy and Spain published caricatures of the prophet Muhammad that have sparked anger among Muslims since they first appeared in a Danish newspaper in September. The Middle East Islamic tradition bars any depiction of the prophet, and publication of the drawings has divided opinion within Europe. French and German papers cited freedom of expression in publishing the cartoons.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014
Barack Obama was first sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2009, and, from that day to this, a battle for the soul of America has been waged. The half-decade since has been one of the most politically polarized periods in U.S. history as conservative talk radio hosts, Fox News commentators, secretive billionaire campaign financiers, the NRA, the tea party movement and right wing celebrities such as Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck have all tried to delegitimize the...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Meg James
Nickelodeon's new cartoon was hatched not through traditional television channels but in a Studio City efficiency apartment nicknamed the "Doodle Chamber. " The 41/2 -minute cartoon about two feisty, accident-prone ducks was intended to be a one-off, a little film crafted to entertain fellow animators at a short-film festival held at a New York bar. But in the hurly-burly world of children's television, network executives are desperate to find that next big hit. When animator Gary Di Raffaele, who goes by the name Gary Doodles, got an inquiry from a Nickelodeon executive about his duck cartoon, which he had posted on YouTube: "I thought it was spam," Di Raffaele said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Wallykazam!," you might have guessed from the title, is a show for young people. Premiering Monday afternoon on Nickelodeon, it is a preschool, literacy-based cartoon that essentially takes a "Sesame Street" sound-of-this-letter blackout and works it into a 22-minute story. Wally is a 6-year-old troll with a puppyish pet dragon named Norville, evidently a graduate of the Scooby-Doo School of Diction, and a magic stick that can create things out of thin air, but only if they begin with the letter-sound of the day. (It's like a supernatural Enigma machine.)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Now here is this unforeseeable artifact, "Chozen," a cartoon series about a gay white rapper, an ex-con (he was set up) living on his sister's couch at a liberal arts college. Premiering Monday on FX, it is from people who make that network's spy-toon "Archer," whose visual style it borrows whole, and from people who made HBO's "Eastbound & Down. " And it is very much as if they had taken these shows - neither of which puts a great point on taste, sensitivity or modesty - and run them at each other very fast.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Ted Rall
After learning that elected officials in the state of California collected more than $200,000 in gifts during 2012 -- which doesn't include the $6.7 million in donations solicited by officials on behalf of their favorite charities and causes  -- the group Common Cause issued a report calling for tighter limits on this potentially corrupting influence. One suggestion: "Apply the $10-per-month limit on gifts from lobbyists to also include gifts from the lobbyists' clients. Currently, clients can give up to $440 per year to public officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Turbo," the racing-snails movie from this summer, is already a cartoon series, "Turbo: F.A.S.T.," suggesting that such an eventuality was in the cards from the beginning (or somewhere near it). That other DreamWorks-made cartoons - including "The Penguins of Madagascar," "Kung Fu Panda" and "Monsters vs. Aliens," all on Nickelodeon - have taken the same route, suggests that, more than an eventuality, it was an inevitability. One difference is that it is being released by Netflix, the streamcaster's first kids' show and ergo a historic moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | From Associated Press
China has announced a ban on cartoons that blend animated elements with live-action actors, a move aimed at nurturing local animators and apparently curbing the use of foreign cartoons. Popular children's television shows featuring human hosts and animated elements such as "Blue's Clues" from the United States and "Teletubbies" from Britain could be included in the ban.
WORLD
March 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Exports to Muslim countries fell by more than 11% last year after a boycott of Danish goods to protest the publication of cartoons of the prophet Muhammad, the government said. Dairy products, dominated by the Scandinavian Arla Foods group, were worst hit, with exports dropping 39%, to $196 million, Statistics Denmark said. The boycott started in Saudi Arabia and spread to other Arab countries.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Ted Rall
From a cartoonist's standpoint, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is the gift that keeps on giving. With allegations that include corruption and inmate abuse, you have to wonder whether the really bad guys aren't the ones inside the cells but the ones guarding them. Responding to numerous credible reports of dirty dealings by deputies, the FBI arrested a number of sheriff's officials in connection with a wide-ranging probe of alleged improprieties by a department charged with - remember?
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Angelenos try not to think about the shifting plates beneath their feet and their wheels, but everyone knows the Big One is coming -- and a Bad Enough One is coming sooner than that. Short of moving somewhere where tectonics aren't quite as disconcerting (i.e., where it snows), there isn't much we can do about earthquakes. But we can prepare for the worst by mitigating the damage. Toward that end, Los Angeles city building officials are creating a list of "soft-story" wood-frame buildings that were built before 1978.
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