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Casey Kasem

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BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Casey Kasem, who gained a national radio audience after "American Top 40" launched in 1970, and his wife, Jean, are listing their Westside estate for sale at $42 million. With 12,000 square feet of living space, seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms, the home has been the site of intimate interviews and sleepovers for as many as 20 youngsters a night. The yard has served as the site of elaborate celebrity-studded gatherings and paintball battles. The syndicated radio host bought the property for Jean Kasem in 1989 as a gift.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Casey Kasem, who gained a national radio audience after "American Top 40" launched in 1970, and his wife, Jean, are listing their Westside estate for sale at $42 million. With 12,000 square feet of living space, seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms, the home has been the site of intimate interviews and sleepovers for as many as 20 youngsters a night. The yard has served as the site of elaborate celebrity-studded gatherings and paintball battles. The syndicated radio host bought the property for Jean Kasem in 1989 as a gift.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | JANE LIEBERMAN
Radio personality Casey Kasem may be on the way out after 18 years as host of "American Top 40," the weekly show on which he plays the week's top-selling pop records. Contract negotiations, which began last summer, have ended in a stalemate over Kasem's salary--an amount both sides refused to disclose Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
The gig : Steven W. Streit is founder and chief executive of Monrovia-based Green Dot Corp., the nation's largest provider of prepaid debit cards. Customers, mostly people without bank accounts, buy the cards at retail outlets, load them with cash or direct-deposit paychecks and use them like bank-issued plastic. They are branded under the Green Dot name and also branded for Wal-Mart Stores. Past life : Streit was a disc jockey (Streiter with the Heater; the Ayatollah of Rock 'n' Rolla)
NEWS
September 25, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
The working conditions are unusual. Even for Beverly Hills. The boss sits in a marbled-to-the-max kitchen. The boss's wife toils in a satin moire-draped dressing room. The publicists make phone calls from the exercise gym. And the typists pound their keyboards on a priceless buffet table that seats 12. "This used to be a dining room," explains actress Jean Kasem, staring at the three rented computers sharing space with gilt-edged china. "Now it's a command post for the homeless."
BUSINESS
November 13, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
The gig : Steven W. Streit is founder and chief executive of Monrovia-based Green Dot Corp., the nation's largest provider of prepaid debit cards. Customers, mostly people without bank accounts, buy the cards at retail outlets, load them with cash or direct-deposit paychecks and use them like bank-issued plastic. They are branded under the Green Dot name and also branded for Wal-Mart Stores. Past life : Streit was a disc jockey (Streiter with the Heater; the Ayatollah of Rock 'n' Rolla)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989
I expect to see material aired on public television that I would not see elsewhere. Stalling or avoiding controversial programs is not what I have come to expect from PBS. Franklin-Trout deserves better treatment than this--and so do the rest of us, the viewers. CASEY KASEM Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991
In his letter (Dec. 10), Ran Ronen, the consul general of Israel in Los Angeles, made a case for his country's position, one of fear of its neighbors. My only comment is: The way to have good neighbors is to be one. If that goes for the rest of the Middle East, then it goes for Israel, too. CASEY KASEM, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998
Like many others, I was saddened to learn of Flip Wilson's passing (Nov. 26). Few people know that Flip was an authority on the Arab American poet, Khalil Gibran. Flip participated in fund-raisers across the country, speaking about Gibran and quoting from "The Prophet," helping raise the money to establish the Kahlil Gibran National Park in Washington. He will be missed. CASEY KASEM Los Angeles
NEWS
March 2, 1990
I want to thank The Times for its article on former Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark. These days especially, it's rare to find someone with his integrity and willingness to buck the tide and take on unpopular causes, forgoing the money to follow his conscience. In pursuing human rights for all people instead of leaving "blind spots" (Palestinians, for example), Clark delivers a message to progressives everywhere: Are you in this thing 100% or not? Agree with him or not, the point is, he truly believes in those ideals we were taught America is supposed to uphold.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
It's the final countdown -- again -- for Casey Kasem. The radio legend will wind up his "American Top 40" spinoff programs, "American Top 20" and "American Top 10," on July 4 -- a date of significance: He created the franchise on July 4, 1970. "Hosting various versions of my countdown program has kept me extremely busy, and I loved every minute of it," Kasem, 77, said in a statement. "However, this decision will free up time I need to focus on myriad other projects." But that famous voice (he also provided the vocals for Shaggy on the "Scooby Doo" cartoon series)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Casey Kasem is stepping down next month as host of "American Top 40," the landmark radio show that counts down the week's top pop hits. After more than three decades, the velvet-voiced radio personality will pass his duties along to a new generation: disc jockey and "American Idol" host Ryan Seacrest. Premiere Radio Networks, which syndicates the program, announced the transition Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998
Like many others, I was saddened to learn of Flip Wilson's passing (Nov. 26). Few people know that Flip was an authority on the Arab American poet, Khalil Gibran. Flip participated in fund-raisers across the country, speaking about Gibran and quoting from "The Prophet," helping raise the money to establish the Kahlil Gibran National Park in Washington. He will be missed. CASEY KASEM Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996
Character actor Terrence Beasor's defense of the use of stereotypes ("Stereotypes: A Time-Honored Tradition," Counterpunch, Jan. 8) is a great example of the complacent rationalizing that perpetuates this practice. Laila Lalami pointed to "Father of the Bride, Part II" and other film examples of current anti-Arab stereotyping. In replying to her, Beasor asks us to accept stereotyping as "an old and honored form of shorthand on the part of writers . . . not based on racial, ethnic or gender bias."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993
The Times has to be commended for publishing "No Magic in 'Aladdin's' Offensive Lyrics" (May 17) by Casey Kasem and Jay Goldsworthy. Arab-Americans, as other ethnic groups, feel offended when they hear lyrics and see scenes that denote Arabs and their culture and tradition. It is time for writers and producers to stop offensive slurs against Arab-Americans and other ethnic groups. After all, "Aladdin" is an Arabic name meaning "loftiness of religion." JOSEPH R. HAIEK, Publisher Arab-American Almanac and the News Circle Magazine
SPORTS
March 27, 1993
Nobody could have said it better than Mike Downey ("He Won't Ride Off Into the Sunset") about Jim Harrick and his three-year contract extension. Jim has had to put up with more "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" than Hamlet, and more mud slung in his direction than a Presidential or mayoral candidate. Yet he perseveres and does what a coach should do on behalf of his team. Three cheers for three more years. CASEY KASEM Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991
Congratulations on Lawrence Christon's study of actor-filmmaker and Latino spokesman Edward James Olmos ("Breaking the Chains," Sept 1). We had a chance to read about the single-minded dedication it takes to make a difference, to encourage change, to get the word across and to convince others to go along with you. And why not Olmos for governor? He's got my vote and thousands of others from those who believe he places principle before politics. CASEY KASEM Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993
The Times has to be commended for publishing "No Magic in 'Aladdin's' Offensive Lyrics" (May 17) by Casey Kasem and Jay Goldsworthy. Arab-Americans, as other ethnic groups, feel offended when they hear lyrics and see scenes that denote Arabs and their culture and tradition. It is time for writers and producers to stop offensive slurs against Arab-Americans and other ethnic groups. After all, "Aladdin" is an Arabic name meaning "loftiness of religion." JOSEPH R. HAIEK, Publisher Arab-American Almanac and the News Circle Magazine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1992
Casey Kasem, our local friend of the PLO, smugly tendered some advice to the counsul general of Israel here in Los Angeles, by lecturing the Israelis, "The way to have good neighbors is to be one" (letter, Dec. 24). It's quite clear that Kasem and those like him have not been successful in carrying this message of good neighborliness to their Arab brothers in the Mideast. The Arabs have been trying to exterminate the state and people of Israel from the day the latter became a state some 43 years ago, by means of war, terrorism against noncombatant civilians and Israeli kids in their cribs, and even against non-Israelis like Americans and American allies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991
In his letter (Dec. 10), Ran Ronen, the consul general of Israel in Los Angeles, made a case for his country's position, one of fear of its neighbors. My only comment is: The way to have good neighbors is to be one. If that goes for the rest of the Middle East, then it goes for Israel, too. CASEY KASEM, Los Angeles
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