Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCash Cow
IN THE NEWS

Cash Cow

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The last new episode of "I Love Lucy" was broadcast over 50 years ago, but the classic sitcom is still a cash cow for CBS. Speaking at Goldman Sachs Communacopia Conference in New York on Thursday, CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves said "I Love Lucy" is still delivering about $20 million in revenue. Reruns of the show still run on a regular basis on the cable channel TV Land.  During much of the interview, Moonves stressed the value of CBS' new and old content, particularly as new platforms such as Netflix and Amazon are spending heavily for product.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
LAS VEGAS - Telling friends that you're heading to Las Vegas for some Shakespeare is a bit like claiming you read Playboy for the interviews. Well, I did indeed head to Vegas last weekend to see "The Tempest," and I can guarantee that I was the only person on my morning flight reading Harold C. Goddard's classic "The Meaning of Shakespeare. " Just a few pages from the chapter on "The Tempest," mind you. The guys downing pre-lunch wine and cocktails around me were whooping it up "Hangover"-style.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 11, 1994 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Winning the U.S. Open is worth $550,000 on the spot and much more than that later on in endorsement and commercial income. Those payoffs make up the major portion of $9,360,100 in prize money offered in this final Grand Slam event of the tennis year. Just making the field of 128 is worth $8,150, a tidy payoff for what is just one day's work for 64 of them. And if a player who happens to get there is a qualifier, add another $3,000 on to that.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The last new episode of "I Love Lucy" was broadcast over 50 years ago, but the classic sitcom is still a cash cow for CBS. Speaking at Goldman Sachs Communacopia Conference in New York on Thursday, CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves said "I Love Lucy" is still delivering about $20 million in revenue. Reruns of the show still run on a regular basis on the cable channel TV Land.  During much of the interview, Moonves stressed the value of CBS' new and old content, particularly as new platforms such as Netflix and Amazon are spending heavily for product.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2001 | Brian Lowry
Steve Rodgers knows he's swimming upstream. As a distributor of movies and TV shows, he must compete with the likes of Time Warner, Disney and Viacom for precious shelf space on television stations. It's the life of a small fish in a pond in which the big fish have been swallowing one another. Companies that distribute programs have expanded, with mergers bringing Paramount, CBS and King World under one corporate umbrella.
NEWS
December 14, 2004 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
It's A CHILLY MORNING AT SWITZER'S PICNIC AREA ALONG the Angeles Crest Highway, about 9 miles beyond Pasadena, and if you're not going to step lightly, you'll have to move aside. I'm trying to keep up with Congress, and it takes fancy footwork. The trail runs along the creek. I sidestep muck and golden alder leaves. This is a handsome stretch but not quite what I need. I need more panorama, more oomph, more something.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer
It's no secret that "The Nutcracker" has long been the cash cow of the ballet repertory. What the Christmas crunch is to retailers, the Tchaikovsky chestnut is to ballet companies. Since before there were Santas in shopping malls, troupes have been making nearly half of their annual nut (so to speak) off a couple of weeks' worth of sugarplums. But "The Nutcracker" is becoming a tough nut to crack.
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world shook when Dolly the sheep was cloned. But nary a ripple greeted the news of Rosie the calf. That was so even though the sweet-faced Holstein made its own impressive history earlier in February, becoming the first cow to produce milk with significant levels of a human protein--promising enrichment for infants and elderly alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
LAS VEGAS - Telling friends that you're heading to Las Vegas for some Shakespeare is a bit like claiming you read Playboy for the interviews. Well, I did indeed head to Vegas last weekend to see "The Tempest," and I can guarantee that I was the only person on my morning flight reading Harold C. Goddard's classic "The Meaning of Shakespeare. " Just a few pages from the chapter on "The Tempest," mind you. The guys downing pre-lunch wine and cocktails around me were whooping it up "Hangover"-style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991
I note that one of the holiday football games will be played in the Thrifty Car Rental Holiday Bowl. I hope the folks in Washington will heed this and take actions that should jump-start the economy and reduce the deficit. Money would pour in if the government had sponsors: the Toys R Us Congress, the Ms. Magazine Supreme Court, the Mastercard White House. I also have a suggestion for turning the Pentagon into a cash cow if anyone is interested. FRANK E. TAYLOR Orange
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2010 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael Antonovich has contacted the City of Commerce about the possibility of it annexing Vernon, in large part because he said he wants to prevent a similar move by the city of Los Angeles. Several state and local politicians in recent months have discussed the possibility of disincorporating Vernon following the revelation of outsized compensation and other benefits paid to top officials and attorneys, and the indictment of former City Administrator Donal O'Callaghan on conflict-of-interest charges.
OPINION
February 6, 2010
If you're caught running a red light in Los Angeles, be prepared to shell out $446, up from $271 eight years ago. Make a rolling right turn at a stoplight and the ticket comes to $381 -- more than double what it cost in 2008. Park at an expired meter, pay a $50 fine. It's getting so a person can't even drive badly in this town anymore. Officials have been jacking up traffic fines recently as a budget crunch encourages creative methods of raising municipal revenue. Not only are fines going up, but the city is considering ways to nab more people to pay them.
OPINION
October 4, 2009
Re "Students, time to stand up," Column, Sept. 29 Hector Tobar has it right in so many ways. What all of us in California need to realize is that the university system (UC and Cal State) is a cash cow for the state. Every dollar invested in our university system is returned in multiples, from higher lifetime salaries paying more taxes, from attracting high-tech businesses to the state, from higher expectations for families and communities keeping kids out of trouble, and more. Because of the severe cuts at the university where I teach, most of our lecturers will be let go next quarter and our course offerings will decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | Denise Martin and Joe Flint
An estimated 3.7 million viewers tuned into the second season premiere of HBO's "True Blood" Sunday, and an additional 1.4 million watched the 11 p.m. encore. That makes the episode HBO's most-watched program since the finale of "The Sopranos" in 2007, which drew 11.9 million and still ranks as the pay channel's most-watched series. The vampire drama is also on track to become the network's next big cash cow. In addition to the opener's audience being up what HBO said was 157% from last year's series premiere, DVD sales for the first season of "True Blood" have exploded.
SPORTS
June 16, 2009 | Chris Dufresne
In Tom Hansen's 26 years as commissioner, the Pacific 10 Conference has enjoyed unprecedented success -- particularly in the non-revenue Olympic sports. However, it has also endured its share of criticism, notably its lack of national exposure in an ESPN world. Hansen is set to retire July 1, meaning he will be leaving in the midst of an investigation into alleged NCAA rules violations concerning USC football and basketball. In a recent question-and-answer session with The Times, Hansen talked about the investigation, the controversial Bowl Championship Series he was instrumental in forming, and the future of the Pac-10.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2009 | Roger Vincent
In what could be the largest commercial real estate transaction of the year in Los Angeles County, Los Angeles World Airports is negotiating to acquire a 21-acre parking lot on the east edge of LAX, brokers said Tuesday. It is being offered for sale by AMB Properties Corp., a San Francisco industrial landlord that has owned the lot called Park One since 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Six banks between Long Beach and San Diego have been robbed since Jan. 29 by a suspect the Orange County Sheriff's Department dubbed the "Bovine Bandit," authorities said. The male suspect wears a ski mask and asks the teller for money "from the cash cow," the Sheriff's Department said. Three of the robberies occurred in Orange County, the Sheriff's Department said. The last holdup was at the Bank of America in Rancho Santa Margarita on May 12.
NEWS
February 8, 1998
The notion that the erratic mating behavior of humans parallels the predictable mating behavior of the animal kingdom is hardly new. What's new in first-time novelist Laura Zigman's funny new book, "Animal Husbandry" (The Dial Press), is a) a clever and comic theory and b) timing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2009 | Christopher Knight ART CRITIC
Shepard Fairey is a talented Los Angeles graphic designer who has twice hit the big time with the public. Provocative connections between the two episodes emerge from a survey of Fairey's work at the Institute of Contemporary Art. So do the rather stark limitations of his work. Fairey's first impact was commercial -- "Obey Giant," a 1989 street-art project that grew into a thriving youth-market business in stickers, posters, apparel, notebooks and other retail products. His second was political -- a 2008 poster, made independently to support Barack Obama's presidential aspirations, that was quickly embraced by the candidate and an ever-widening cadre of supporters.
OPINION
March 23, 2008 | Greg Nelson, Greg Nelson was general manager of the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment from 2001 to 2006.
The city of Los Angeles is facing a budget gap this year of $150 million and up to double that next year. Except for police hiring, virtually all city services are on the table for cutbacks. In the past, City Hall has tended to reach for short-term solutions to close budget gaps caused by brief economic downturns.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|