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Casino Royale

ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2006 | Sheigh Crabtree, Special to The Times
THE crew expected a set crawling with sex kittens but what they got instead was a couple of grizzled stuntmen and a chiseled blond Bond. "When the crew realized there were not going to be any naked girls on-set, some were a bit upset," admits Daniel Kleinman, the title designer behind the opening credit sequences for the last five James Bond films, including "Casino Royale," which opened Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2006
I agree with Kenneth Turan's review of "The Good Shepherd" ["A Spy Whose Soul Goes Undercover," Dec. 22]. I've often felt Robert De Niro was an underrated director. Just watch his feature directorial debut, "A Bronx Tale" (1993). It is much different than the more stylized "The Good Shepherd." With recent spy movies such as "Casino Royale" dazzling audiences with action, it's refreshing to see a film that takes a more understated approach to the world of espionage, and even more refreshing to find a filmmaker who isn't afraid to allow his actors to take their time and have moments, an element often missing in today's blockbusters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Michael Ordona
After the big gambles that paid off with "Casino Royale," the makers of the James Bond series are now playing with the house's money. "We were coming off a highly successful film, 'Die Another Day'; we sat down with the studio and said, 'We want to do the original book, and there's a 20-minute card game in it. It starts out black and white. There's no Q, no Moneypenny and the girl dies at the end,' " said longtime producer Barbara Broccoli with a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2007 | Susan King
The Life After 1: James Bond fans were very vocal when it was announced two years ago that Pierce Brosnan would no longer be sipping shaken martinis as super-suave James Bond in the 007 action-thriller "Casino Royale." And they got downright vehement when it was announced that blond, blue-eyed British actor Daniel Craig, who played toughies in such films as "The Road to Perdition" and "Layer Cake," would be given the license to kill.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
THERE has always been something adolescent about 007. Sure, Britain's best-known secret agent occasionally bears the fate of the free world on his deltoids. What he hasn't shouldered, as he's whizzed from one adventure to another over the last 44 years, is the ordinary responsibilities and commitments of a modern adult male.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Casino Royale, indeed. James Bond would look like a shrinking violet next to new casino owner Ripley Holden, the hero of CBS' new drama "Viva Laughlin." In one early scene, Holden, played by the ruggedly handsome Lloyd Owen, arrives at the opening of his new venture wearing a killer smile and an even more killer tuxedo. But chances are you'd never catch Bond singing aloud to Peter Gabriel's "Big Time" as Holden does as he struts around slot machines and blackjack tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Craig brought the 45-year-old James Bond series into the 21st century with his gritty, sexy turn as 007 in "Casino Royale" (Sony, $29). The two-disc "special edition," though, is strictly 20th century. It's not that the two main featurettes -- "Becoming Bond" and "James Bond: For Real," which looks at the gravity-defying stunts -- are bad; the DVD is just short on real extras. Where's the audio commentary with Craig or director Martin Campbell, deleted scenes or outtakes?
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