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Caspar W Weinberger

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NEWS
May 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Japan on Monday bestowed the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun on former U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger for his contribution to Japan's defense, the Foreign Ministry said.
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NATIONAL
April 5, 2006
Caspar Weinberger was remembered at a funeral service at Ft. Myer Memorial Chapel as a Defense secretary who took on totalitarian regimes and helped to end the Cold War -- and also hid chocolate in his desk and liked to catch a daytime nap. Weinberger, who was President Reagan's Pentagon chief, died last week at 88 in Maine.
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NEWS
March 1, 1988
Former Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger is joining the law firm of Rogers & Wells as a Washington-based specialist in international law and finance, the 275-lawyer New York-based firm headed by former Secretary of State William P. Rogers announced. The firm said Weinberger will not engage in any work involving the federal government, defense contracts or other matters connected with the Defense Department. Weinberger resigned from President Reagan's Cabinet late last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2006 | George Skelton
Few people are indispensable, but at least two were for Ronald Reagan. It's unlikely that Reagan would have become the successful governor he did without the early, vital help of Caspar W. Weinberger and Lyn Nofziger. And without an impressive record to brag about -- welfare reform, truly balancing the budget, protecting the environment, launching an anti-tax revolt -- Reagan never could have been elected president.
NEWS
November 4, 1987
NATO defense ministers met with Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger in Monterey, Calif., to discuss details of the proposed U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms treaty. Ministers of the 15-nation Nuclear Planning Group said they generally support the tentative agreement to eliminate short- and medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe, but there is concern about the timetable of the withdrawal and the alliance's vulnerability to the Warsaw Pact's superior conventional forces.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Classified security arrangements for Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger were accidentally broadcast over a taxi radio network, officials said Monday. The security breach occurred when Australia's Department of Communications gave U.S. security agents a radio frequency it thought was not used, said Joel Webster, a department spokesman. However, the messages were clearly heard by the radio dispatcher of Sydney's largest cab company, Taxis Combined.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan today named his former defense secretary, Caspar W. Weinberger, and his former secretary of transportation, Drew Lewis, to the National Economic Commission, charged with seeking ways to reduce the federal budget deficit. Senate Republican Leader Bob Dole and House Republican Leader Robert H. Michel also appointed members of the commission today. Dole chose Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Special prosecutors brought new accusations of lying against former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger in connection with the Iran-Contra scandal. In a filing with U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan, the prosecutors alleged newly examined notes of Weinberger's contradict his previous statements and give additional information about the evolution of the scandal itself.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Religious broadcaster Pat Robertson and Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel joined a New York rally demanding that President Bush commute the life sentence of convicted spy Jonathan Pollard. Robertson asked the crowd whether it was "poetic justice" that Caspar W. Weinberger was indicted last week on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice in the Iran-Contra affair. Weinberger, as U.S.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | From Reuters
Two hundred people protesting U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger's Norwegian visit charged the American Embassy on Tuesday, smashing windows and the front door until they were repulsed by riot police. The protesters, chanting "Norway out of NATO" and "Weinberger go home," then moved to the U.S. ambassador's residence nearby, where they were again dispersed by police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993
Caspar Weinberger, former secretary of defense, spoke last week on "The World and Mr. Clinton." His remarks were sponsored by the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. From Weinberger's address: On Foreign Policy Issues "What worries me, I think, most of all now is that we do not seem to have a clearly defined foreign policy and yet we are putting American forces into positions of great danger without clearly defined missions.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Accusing former President George Bush of "an absolute disdain for the rule of law," independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh said Monday that Bush's pardon of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger blocked public airing of "new and disturbing facts" about the Iran-Contra scandal. Walsh, in an interim report to Congress prompted by Bush's Christmas Eve pardon, said that former Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's failure to turn over typewritten notes requested years ago by independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh is not in itself the basis for bringing a criminal charge, legal experts said Sunday. Several legal experts said that Bush's failure to reveal the notes, which Walsh has characterized as "misconduct," is not itself a crime because the prosecutor had not formally subpoenaed them under a court order. Failure to comply with a subpoena can be the basis for a criminal contempt charge.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a marked difference with many Democrats in Congress, two Democratic leaders--House Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington and defense secretary nominee Les Aspin of Wisconsin--had assured President Bush they would support his decision to pardon former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, The Times has learned.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh charged on Thursday that "a pattern of deception and obstruction" at the top of the Bush and Reagan administrations concealed the nature of potential crimes committed by two Presidents and one Cabinet secretary. On what evidence does Walsh base this extraordinary charge? How strong is the case Walsh could bring against Presidents Bush and Reagan and former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger?
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Following is independent counsel Lawrence Walsh' statement on the presidential pardon of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others charged in the Iran-Contra scandal: President Bush's pardon of Caspar Weinberger and other Iran-Contra defendants undermines the principle that no man is above the law. It demonstrates that powerful people with powerful allies can commit serious crimes in high office--deliberately abusing the public trust--without consequence.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said Monday that the United States and Japan will work together to keep an edge in anti-submarine warfare in the aftermath of Soviet purchase of Japanese machinery that makes quiet submarine propellers.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
Following is the text of President Bush's statement pardoning former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others in the Iran-Contra investigation: Today I am exercising my power under the Constitution to pardon former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and others for their conduct related to the Iran-Contra affair.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The announcement of presidential pardons for Caspar W. Weinberger and other Iran-Contra defendants shook the nation's political Establishment Thursday, with leading Democrats charging that the action will worsen the erosion of public respect for the law while Republicans rallied to President Bush's defense. "It leads people to believe that if you're high enough up and you commit a crime, you can get off," said Sen. Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.) President-elect Bill Clinton voiced similar criticism.
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