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Castaic Lake Water Agency

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Castaic Lake Water Agency, obscure to many, has used the public's lack of attention to water issues to the great disadvantage of the local taxpayers it represents. The board voted in bonded indebtedness of more than $160 million last year without a public vote. It purchased a family-owned water company with polluted wells for $63 million, four times over the appraised value, leaving taxpayers stuck with the costs of cleanup. It supported Newhall Land & Farming's efforts to get the huge Newhall Ranch project approved by entering the lawsuit (with taxpayer money, of course!
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2005 | Tonya Alanez, Times Staff Writer
Two environmental groups have filed suit to prevent shipments of water from Kern County farms to burgeoning developments in the Santa Clarita Valley. Officially, the annual shipments of 41,000 acre-feet of water are destined for Castaic Lake Water Agency's existing customers in northern Los Angeles County and southern Ventura County, as well as for upcoming Santa Clarita Valley developments that the agency would serve. An acre-foot of water is enough to meet the needs of two families for a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A reform candidate has toppled the president of the powerful Castaic Lake Water Agency board, but two incumbents held onto their positions. * Research scientist Randall Pfiester--who said during the campaign that the board didn't do enough to make the public aware of its actions--won 54.9% of the vote Tuesday to beat 13-year incumbent Mary Spring. Pfiester, who unsuccessfully campaigned for the City Council in 1992, said he had not expected to win the water board race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Friday ruled that a Santa Clarita water wholesaler's arrangement for selling water on the retail market violates state law and must stop. The decision comes three years after the Castaic Lake Water Agency, a public entity that sells imported water, paid $63 million for the Santa Clarita Water Co., a private company that sold water to customers in parts of northern Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governing board of the Castaic Lake Water Agency, faced with a complaint that four agency officials may have violated state conflict-of-interest laws, hired a high-powered Sacramento political law firm Thursday for advice. Emerging from a long, closed-door meeting, the agency's board voted 9 to 1 to retain the law firm of Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Mueller & Naylor to deal with the conflict complaint that two activists filed Monday with the state Fair Political Practices Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Castaic Lake Water Agency has moved toward more than doubling hookup fees for new construction in anticipation of state budget cuts. The new fees would range from $6,806 to $9,175, an increase of 120% to 152%, depending on the distances involved in piping in the water, said Robert Sagehorn, the agency's general manager. Although any property owner in the Santa Clarita Valley who requests a hookup would be affected, the new fees would primarily affect developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials Wednesday offered to slash the scope of their $1.1-billion redevelopment plan by one-fourth to settle a lawsuit filed by the Castaic Lake Water Agency. If accepted, Santa Clarita's Community Recovery Plan would be capped at $854 million in projects and exclude much of the Saugus community previously marked for redevelopment--a cut of about 25% of the original plan's geographic area. The offer was made Wednesday morning to water agency representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four days after the city stopped competing with the Castaic Lake Water Agency to buy a water retailer--theoretically easing tensions between the two public agencies--the agency filed a second lawsuit against Santa Clarita's $1.1-billion redevelopment plan. Water agency officials say the city's Community Recovery Plan goes beyond rebuilding from the Northridge earthquake and the roughly $200 million in damage it caused in Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999 | PAUL M. ANDERSON
A Superior Court judge threw out a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Castaic Lake Water Agency's right to buy a retail water company. The plaintiffs, including a Santa Clarita city councilwoman, argued that state law prohibits the Castaic Lake Water Agency, a water wholesaler, from buying and operating the Santa Clarita Water Co., a water retailer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1996
Re "State Officials Urge 20% Price Cut for Water Agency," Dec. 5. The management of the Santa Clarita Water Co. should be terminated. If [William J.] Manetta, the overpaid president of Santa Clarita Water, were an elected official, we could recall his greedy behind. Manetta does in fact sit on the Castaic Lake Water Agency board, where he votes to increase our taxes, and is protected in an almost incestuous relationship by the majority of that agency board. We have taxation without representation!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2002 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest residential development in the history of Los Angeles County has hit another legal snag over water supply that could further delay construction. The state Supreme Court refused to interfere with a lower court decision that set aside the transfer of 41,000 acre-feet of water each year from the Kern County Water Agency to the Castaic Lake Water Agency, which would supply a portion of water to Newhall Ranch, a proposed 21,600-home subdivision in the Santa Clarita Valley. A Superior Court ruling found that the Castaic Lake Water Agency's environmental report was inadequate and needed to be revised, agency spokeswoman Mary Lou Cotton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite criticisms that its projections are unrealistic, a local agency adopted a plan on Wednesday to help satisfy water demands in the fast-growing Santa Clarita Valley for the next 20 years. The plan adopted by the Castaic Lake Water Agency includes proposals to develop underground reservoirs, expand the use of recycled water and to use desalinated water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000
Four Santa Clarita water agencies filed suit Wednesday against current and former owners of the proposed 1,000-acre Porta Bella housing development, seeking cleanup or replacement of contaminated water wells. The suit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court to force immediate steps to clean up four wells that have been shut down since 1997 because of perchlorate contamination, said Robert Sagehorn, general manager of the Castaic Lake Water Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN and TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A state agency has proposed steps that it says will provide enough water to serve the tens of thousands of new residents expected to flood into the Santa Clarita Valley over the next 20 years. Those measures include new underground reservoirs and increased use of recycled water, according to the report by the Castaic Lake Water Agency, which supplies water to four utilities that serve the fast-growing region of north Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Castaic Lake Water Agency, obscure to many, has used the public's lack of attention to water issues to the great disadvantage of the local taxpayers it represents. The board voted in bonded indebtedness of more than $160 million last year without a public vote. It purchased a family-owned water company with polluted wells for $63 million, four times over the appraised value, leaving taxpayers stuck with the costs of cleanup. It supported Newhall Land & Farming's efforts to get the huge Newhall Ranch project approved by entering the lawsuit (with taxpayer money, of course!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campaign placards touting candidates for a little-known water board outnumber signs for all other races in this community where the issue of sufficient water to quench the thirst of booming development is a hot topic. Seven challengers are seeking to unseat three incumbents on the Castaic Lake Water Agency, which is the sole wholesaler of state water supplies to four water retailers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1999 | PAUL M. ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Castaic Lake Water Agency bought the privately held Santa Clarita Water Co. from the Bonelli family for $63 million Friday, despite a lawsuit challenging the acquisition. The purchase will broaden the authority of the agency, which as a wholesaler in the Santa Clarita Valley plays a key role in determining future growth for the region. The Santa Clarita Water Co. serves about 21,000 residential and business customers, mostly in Saugus and Canyon Country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU
The Castaic Lake Water Agency received an environmental award Thursday from the Assn. of California Water Agencies. Castaic won the Theodore Roosevelt Environmental Award, which recognizes agencies that promote or protect the environment while managing the public's water needs, said Jennifer Persike-Becker, director of communications for the association. The association has 450 member agencies, which combined are responsible for about 90% of the water delivered statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999 | PAUL M. ANDERSON
A Superior Court judge threw out a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Castaic Lake Water Agency's right to buy a retail water company. The plaintiffs, including a Santa Clarita city councilwoman, argued that state law prohibits the Castaic Lake Water Agency, a water wholesaler, from buying and operating the Santa Clarita Water Co., a water retailer.
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