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March 8, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Painting pinups on airplane nose cones is back in vogue at Castle Air Force Base in California where a KC-135 Stratotanker sports a 1940s-era calendar pinup in a midriff blouse and miniskirt rippling in the breeze. Castle Air Force Base officials said the painting is designed to instill pride in the crews that fly and maintain Strategic Air Command aircraft. A sketch of a knight with a sword and shield mounted on a horse has already been approved for decorating the nose of another Stratotanker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Military officials are stepping up efforts to locate radioactive materials believed to be buried at the former Castle Air Force Base, now home to a federal prison holding about 1,400 inmates. The Air Force plans to interview more former airmen and conduct searches with metal detectors and ground-penetrating radar in late October or early November, said Jody Wireman, a toxicologist in the environmental radiation branch of the Air Force Institute for Operational Health in Texas.
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NEWS
December 13, 1985
Failure to follow training flight rules caused the Aug. 27 crash of a KC-135 Stratotanker that killed seven fliers during a "touch-and- go" landing at Beale Air Force Base near Marysville in August, a three-member investigative team concluded. The mistakes began when the aircraft from Castle Air Force Base, near Merced, approached on its third practice landing with a rocking wing motion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The Air Force has spent $177 million to clean up environmental hazards at the former Castle Air Force Base and expects to spend an additional $127 million before the job is finished. The money would not cover the cleanup costs if radioactive materials are found at the former Strategic Air Command base. The military confirmed this week that it had kept nuclear weapons at Castle, and said radioactive waste associated with those weapons might be buried on site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The Air Force has spent $177 million to clean up environmental hazards at the former Castle Air Force Base and expects to spend an additional $127 million before the job is finished. The money would not cover the cleanup costs if radioactive materials are found at the former Strategic Air Command base. The military confirmed this week that it had kept nuclear weapons at Castle, and said radioactive waste associated with those weapons might be buried on site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Military officials are stepping up efforts to locate radioactive materials believed to be buried at the former Castle Air Force Base, now home to a federal prison holding about 1,400 inmates. The Air Force plans to interview more former airmen and conduct searches with metal detectors and ground-penetrating radar in late October or early November, said Jody Wireman, a toxicologist in the environmental radiation branch of the Air Force Institute for Operational Health in Texas.
NEWS
August 28, 1985 | United Press International
A four-engine KC-135 tanker crashed and burned Tuesday during practice for takeoffs and landings a mile north of the Beale Air Force Base runway, killing all seven crewmen aboard. Capt. Joseph Saxon, information officer at the base 50 miles northeast of Sacramento, said the victims were from Castle Air Force Base near Merced. Their names were not immediately released. An accident board of Air Force officers immediately began an investigation to determine the cause of the crash.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California lawmakers on Tuesday urged members of a military base-closing commission to preserve Ft. Ord near Monterey, the Long Beach Naval Station and Castle Air Force Base in Merced, charging that the Pentagon erred in branding the bases as obsolete. However, Sens. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and John Seymour (R-Calif.) and most of the state's House delegation did not object to shutting down eight other targeted military facilities in the state, including the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Christopher Cox told the national base-closing commission Tuesday that he supports the Pentagon's plan to close the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin as long as the military property can be sold for private development. "In the final analysis," Cox said in written testimony, "the Pentagon plan will only make sense if the land that now comprises the Tustin base is sold."
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Christopher Cox told the national base-closing commission Tuesday that he supports the Pentagon's plan to close the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin as long as the military property can be sold for private development. "In the final analysis," Cox said in written testimony, "the Pentagon plan will only make sense if the land that now comprises the Tustin base is sold."
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California lawmakers on Tuesday urged members of a military base-closing commission to preserve Ft. Ord near Monterey, the Long Beach Naval Station and Castle Air Force Base in Merced, charging that the Pentagon erred in branding the bases as obsolete. However, Sens. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and John Seymour (R-Calif.) and most of the state's House delegation did not object to shutting down eight other targeted military facilities in the state, including the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Painting pinups on airplane nose cones is back in vogue at Castle Air Force Base in California where a KC-135 Stratotanker sports a 1940s-era calendar pinup in a midriff blouse and miniskirt rippling in the breeze. Castle Air Force Base officials said the painting is designed to instill pride in the crews that fly and maintain Strategic Air Command aircraft. A sketch of a knight with a sword and shield mounted on a horse has already been approved for decorating the nose of another Stratotanker.
NEWS
December 13, 1985
Failure to follow training flight rules caused the Aug. 27 crash of a KC-135 Stratotanker that killed seven fliers during a "touch-and- go" landing at Beale Air Force Base near Marysville in August, a three-member investigative team concluded. The mistakes began when the aircraft from Castle Air Force Base, near Merced, approached on its third practice landing with a rocking wing motion.
NEWS
August 28, 1985 | United Press International
A four-engine KC-135 tanker crashed and burned Tuesday during practice for takeoffs and landings a mile north of the Beale Air Force Base runway, killing all seven crewmen aboard. Capt. Joseph Saxon, information officer at the base 50 miles northeast of Sacramento, said the victims were from Castle Air Force Base near Merced. Their names were not immediately released. An accident board of Air Force officers immediately began an investigation to determine the cause of the crash.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lucky, the dog whose daring freeway joy ride made him a San Joaquin Valley hero, has a new home. The 9-month-old white dog was taken home by Castle Air Force Base aircraft inspectorWarren Abbott. The county animal shelter had received about 25 calls from would-be adoptersand held a drawing to select the new owner, choosing Abbott. Lucky won local fame for hisgutsy ride on the running board of a truck heading up California 99.
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