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Catalytic Converters

BUSINESS
March 3, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Corning Inc. said it has developed a catalytic converter filter to reduce auto emissions as much as 70% from current levels and that will help auto makers meet new pollution limits. The honeycombed filter is known as a substrate and will let auto makers avoid using bigger converters. It will go on sale this year for installation in model year 2000 vehicles; Corning would not disclose sales estimates for the filter.
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NEWS
May 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Catalytic converters, designed to scrub smog out of automobile exhaust, are spewing greenhouse gases from tailpipes into the upper atmosphere, the Environmental Protection Agency has concluded. The converters, while breaking down smog-causing nitrogen and oxygen from car exhaust, are also rearranging the compounds to form nitrous oxide, which is more than 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, the most common of the greenhouse gases.
OPINION
March 15, 1992 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
Bad science, Republican opportunism and neoliberal environmental regulation are now massing forces for merciless assault on that heart muscle of American civilization, the old car, or clunker. The White House, against the deadline of a primary in the auto-producing state of Michigan, has formulated a plan whereby companies that buy old cars and then junk them could get "pollution credits."
BUSINESS
August 16, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
Atlantic Richfield Co. on Tuesday unveiled a low-emission unleaded gasoline to replace leaded regular, which the company has said it would drop from more than 700 Southern California stations on Sept. 1. The newly formulated gasoline--designed for use only by the area's 1.2 million vehicles without catalytic converters--is being introduced in part to bolster the oil company's argument that gasoline, not methanol, should be the main vehicle fuel under any clean-air plans.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: My car, a 1977 station wagon with a catalytic converter, now has more than 100,000 miles on it. Is the catalytic converter still doing what it is supposed to do? How much longer will it function well? What effect does the malfunctioning of a converter have on an engine? And what does all this have to do with air quality?--A.K.E. Answer: Until very recently, little was known publicly about how well emission systems hold up in cars as they age and accumulate miles. Under federal regulations, emissions systems in cars are supposed to continue to do their job for at least 5 years or 50,000 miles, and auto makers must warrant the key parts of the car that control emissions, including the catalytic converter.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that 109 muffler shops throughout the country are violating federal law by installing improper after-market catalytic converters on cars. The agency said that violation notices totaling more than $1 million in proposed fines have been sent to the shops, including 23 in California. Of the 23 California shops, 15 were identified as Midas Muffler outlets.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that 109 muffler shops throughout the country are violating federal law by installing improper after-market catalytic converters on cars. The agency said that violation notices totaling more than $1 million in proposed fines have been sent to the shops, including 23 in California, two of which are in Orange County. Of the 23 California shops, 15 were identified as Midas Muffler outlets.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co., in a move that could mean major cost savings, said today that it has developed a substitute for precious platinum in catalytic converters used to clear vehicle emissions. Ford Chairman Donald Petersen, announcing the development in a speech in Pittsburgh, said the substitute is just as effective as platinum and is significantly cheaper.
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